l no stool

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. She could have eaten something bad. But if she has been off food for that long then she definitely needs to see a vet as will need at least fluids as will be dehydrated now.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Indigestion: Just like us, your cat`s stomach produces various gastric juices to digest its food. If your feline friend is experiencing indigestion, they may vomit clear liquid, yellow foam, or white foam. If you notice this happening, call your local urgent care vet or emergency vet and have your pet seen.
If your cat is vomiting foam, it`s likely to be bile. This is usually yellow or greenish in colour. Blie is an acidic liquid created in the liver and stored in the gallbladder until food has been ingested, when it`s released into the intestine. Bile helps cats break down food.
Your cat may have a lower appetite than usual because of stomach distress, which can make it uncomfortable or even painful to eat. Possible causes of stomach problems include gastroenteritis, pancreatitis, and colitis. Cats with upset stomachs may show other signs such as diarrhea or vomiting. Kidney disease.
Yellow or White Cat Vomit That`s Clear or Foamy Means an Empty Stomach. If your cat coughs up a substance that is clear or foamy and white, it`s likely just coming from their esophagus and an empty stomach. They aren`t coughing up anything they consumed, simply the mucus and water that exists in their body already.
The signs associated with parasite infections are fairly nonspecific, such as a dull haircoat, coughing, vomiting, diarrhea, mucoid or bloody feces, loss of appetite, pale mucous membranes, or a pot-bellied appearance.
“Almost all cats will vomit on occasion, so it`s pretty common,” Teller said. “If a cat vomits every now and then and is otherwise healthy—with a normal appetite, water consumption, activity level, and bowel movements—then generally we are not too worried about it.
Another tip is to add wet food to their diet to ensure they remain hydrated. Additionally, coconut oil has been found to be an effective way to soothe an upset tummy. Lastly, try out some steam therapy by placing your cat in a warm and humid bathroom for about 15 minutes.
Clinical signs can be similar for either form, but tend to come on more rapidly and are more severe in cats with acute pancreatitis. The most common clinical signs are very vague, including lethargy and a reduced appetite. About 50% of cats will have vomiting or weight loss, and some cats will develop diarrhea as well.
White, foamy vomit: Again, this is typically regurgitation from the esophagus or from an empty stomach. Blood in the vomit: The blood is from the mouth, esophagus or stomach. Coffee-ground appearance to the vomit: This type is from bleeding from the stomach, most commonly seen with ulcers.
Hill`s Science Diet Adult Sensitive Stomach & Skin cat food is a popular pick from veterinarians. Most vets will recommend Hill`s Science Diet for cats with sensitive stomachs. This is one of the best dry cat food options because it contains no artificial preservatives, colorings or flavorings.
Obstructions can lead to various complications, including the prevention of food and water from passing through your pet`s GI tract, decreasing their blood flow. Bowel obstructions in pets can also be fatal within 3-7 days.
Treatment Options

Partially blocked intestines may be treated without surgery. In these cases your cat will be hospitalized, given fluids and pain medications and checked in on to see if the blockage passes on its own. If the blockage does not pass, then surgical removal of the foreign body will be required.

Most cats will not have signs of infection; however, cats with major roundworm infections commonly show vomiting, weight loss, dull hair, and a potbellied appearance. The cat may cough if the roundworms move into the lungs. You may notice adult roundworms in your cat`s feces or vomit.
Symptoms may include diarrhoea, tiredness and weakness, abdominal pain and weight loss. Some worms cause anaemia.
You may see whole worms, parts of worms or worm eggs in your pet`s stool or vomit. Worms or eggs can also sometimes migrate to a cat`s anus, getting stuck in the fur. Change in coat: If your cat is infested with a parasite, their fur may appear dull, rumpled or clumped due to lack of nutrients or dehydration.
The animals become excited and breathe rapidly with a rapid heartbeat. Drooling, watery eyes, vomiting, and voiding of urine and feces may occur. Muscle spasms are common. Mucous membranes are bright red at first but then become a bluish color.
Poisoning after eating rodents killed by the rodenticide is called secondary or relay poisoning. This can occur but is rare because a cat would need to eat many rodents that died from the poison.
A number of different diseases such as kidney and liver disease can cause vomiting. Food allergies, intestinal parasites and infections can also result in vomiting. Testing is needed to help determine the cause and find the best solution to help your cat.
Try buying a few types of canned food (pate-style, flaked, etc.) in different flavors. Place some on a small plate and warm it slightly. If your cat shows no interest, try adding a little fish oil, chicken broth, tuna juice, or cooked egg.
Cats suffering from a minor infection or illness can recover very quickly once treatment begins, usually within a day or two. If the underlying condition is more serious, recovery could longer and require a number of different treatment approaches.
Cats can survive for about two weeks without eating but only three days without drinking. The longer your cat goes without proper nutrition, however, the weaker they become, so it`s important to contact your vet if you suspect they haven`t eaten in a day or more.
If there`s an obvious reason for your cat skipping a meal there most likely isn`t anything seriously wrong. That being said, if it`s been more than 24 hours since your cat has eaten or had any water, or they are exhibiting any other symptoms besides lack of appetite, it`s time for the emergency vet.
The most common cause of a cat losing interest in food but acting normally otherwise is simply that she doesn`t like the food. If it is new food or if she has been eating the same food for a long time, she may decide to be picky about what she eats. This is normal—but it can be frustrating!
Natural ways to stimulate appetite in cats

Try luring your cat with a few pieces of their favourite wet food or chunks of fresh tuna. You can also add low-sodium broth or tuna juice to the food as well. Provide variety: Providing variety in their meal plan can stimulate their appetite.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Cat was vomiting for a few days. Took to vet, received anti-nausea medicine 2 days ago. Drinks and no longer vomits, but won’t eat. I’m worried
ANSWER : A. If your cat has been feeling nauseated, it is possible that the nausea, or just general illness is making him want to eat less. However, you can try enticing him to eat with a few tricks geared to cats.

Warming up wet foods or even bland people foods such as plain chicken or boiled hamburger can make food more interesting to cats. Cats tend to go for aromatic rather than flavorful foods, so making the food as “smelly” as possible may encourage your cat to take a bite. Bland foods are also good for helping to soothe upset stomachs, which may still be happening if your cat had recently had a vomiting episode.

However, if enticing your cat to eat does not work, or he continues to refuse to eat any food, it is best to contact your local veterinarian for more care and testing. Cats can become very ill if they refuse to eat for more than a few days, and finding the underlying cause can help your cat feel better.

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. 1 yr old cat, stopt eating last wk few clear-white vomits shows food interest but can’t eat feed milk w’ syringe H20 smtm own she pees norm’l no stool
ANSWER : A. She could have eaten something bad. But if she has been off food for that long then she definitely needs to see a vet as will need at least fluids as will be dehydrated now.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Blood in Dog Stool

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. My dog is a golden retriever breed. 1 year 5 months. He vomits his dog food out (happy dog brand). And he is having diaherra with occasional blood in
ANSWER : A. Get the GI upset under control first. Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet (1:1 ratio of plain boiled boneless chicken and plain white rice). Feed in small, frequent amounts waiting at least one hour between feedings. If the vomiting stops, continue feeding until the stool is normal. Transition slowly to the regular diet. If the vomiting or diarrhea don’t stop, see your veterinarian. Discuss food allergies and food elimination trials. Submit a stool sample to rule out intestinal parasites. Elevate the bowls. If he eats fast, feed small frequent meals throughout the day or buy a special bowl to slow down his eating. Follow the link for an example of a “slow feed” bowl.

http://www.pet360.com/product/61729/kong-slow-feed-dog-bowl

You can also add large stones or balls in his bowl so he has to slow down and eat around them.

Q. 1 yr old cat, stopt eating last wk few clear-white vomits shows food interest but can’t eat feed milk w’ syringe H20 smtm own she pees norm’l no stool
ANSWER : A. I would be concerned about a foreign object causing an obstruction. I would recommend having it checked out by your vet or emergency vet straight away.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Blood in Dog Stool

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. How much should I feed my cat?
ANSWER : A. How much a cat should eat depends on many variables including his activity level, metabolic rate and the food you are offering. Use the feeding guide on the cat food label as a starting point. These instructions usually read something like, “for cats weighing 5 lbs, feed between 1/2 and 3/4 cup per day; for cat’s weighing 10 lbs, feed between 3/4 and 1 cup per day; and for cats weighing 15 lbs, feed between 1 cup and 1 1/2 cups per day”.

Use your cat’s body condition to fine tune the amount you offer. For example, if he is overweight offer an amount on the low end of the recommended range and reevaluate in a few weeks to a month. Your veterinarian can also help you determine how much of a particular food you should be offering.