n’t help

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If your dog is still experiencing the large amount of symptoms listed after care, it may be a good idea to seek a second opinion with another vet, or ask for further testing. The stomach is a necessary part of the body and problems with it such as necrotic tissue can be life-threatening.

Stomach problems do not usually lead to pain in the hind leg, and swelling of the legs or limbs may indicate an injury there instead. Pain in the body can cause pets to become nauseated or ill, which can lead to a loss of appetite, vomiting or lethargy from lack of eating.

Until you can get back to the vet, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and plain white rice may help to soothe minor digestive upset and encourage some eating. However, due to the large amount of symptoms listed, seeking further veterinary care is best.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Organic/Metabolic Diseases –Liver disease, heart disease, hypoglycemia, and diabetes will make your dog stop eating and sleep excessively. Early symptoms of possible heart problems include shunning exercise, rapid breathing, and loss of appetite.
A dog who is struggling to get up or is having a difficult time walking needs to be seen by a veterinarian immediately. The Veterinarian will ask you questions about your dog`s medical history, any noticeable changes in your dog`s behavior, as well as what your dog was doing before their difficulty standing.
Sudden lameness in dogs is often attributed to intervertebral disc disease (IVDD). IVDD occurs when an intervertebral disc`s gel-like center becomes dry and brittle enough to rupture through the outer fibrous ring, compressing your dog`s spinal cord.
The last few days before your dog passes you may notice: extreme weight loss, a distant look in their eyes, a lack of interest in anything, restlessness or unusual stillness, a change in the way that your dog smells, and a changed temperament.
Metabolic Causes of Hind-Leg Weakness in Dogs

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), low red blood cells (anemia), and low potassium (hypokalemia) are all examples of metabolic disorders that can result in hind-limb weakness. These are easily diagnosed with blood tests.

Old labradors might experience two common eye issues, nuclear sclerosis, and cataracts. Cataracts develop in approximately one in every five dogs before age five and after that age.
Acute pancreatitis can occur after a dog eats a fatty food such as pork, beef, and some other human foods. Dogs that get into garbage can develop pancreatitis. Pancreatitis can also have other causes, including certain medications and some viral or bacterial infections.
There is a higher prevalence of pancreatitis in Miniature Schnauzers, Yorkshire Terriers, Cocker Spaniels, Dachshunds, Poodles, sled dogs, or other breeds. Some infections, such as Babesia canis or Leishmania, may also contribute to the development of pancreatitis.
Boiled chicken, low fat beef, egg whites, yogurt, barley and cooked vegetables are also considered safe foods for pancreatitis patients.
The clinical signs of more advanced kidney failure include loss of appetite, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and very bad breath. Occasionally, ulcers will be found in the mouth.
Symptoms of an intestinal blockage begin

Within hours, the foreign object can become lodged within your dog`s intestinal tract, causing a complete or partial obstruction. Once the obstruction has occurred, clinical signs may develop such as vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain and loss of appetite.

Arthritis is stiffness in the joints that can affect the hind legs and cause weakness. Older dogs are especially at risk. As a dog ages, the cartilage between the joints may deteriorate, which can cause inflammation and pain.
It may include orthopedic braces, mobility aids, or physical therapy. Also, pain medication can be administered for pain relief. In addition, dogs suffering from hind leg weakness may benefit from joint supplements for better joint health, which is a common cause of back leg collapse.
Labradors typically live to around 10–12 years old. But many will begin showing signs of aging around seven or so. Luckily, there are a lot of steps you can take to keep your pet comfortable in their elder years.
The main causes of death in Labradors are cancer, heatstroke, epilepsy, heart disease and bloat (gastric torsion). Labradors also suffer from hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia and degenerative myelopathy as well as certain types of skin diseases.
The average lifespan for a black labrador retriever is 10-12 years. It is a very healthy breed with few major health issues.
The digestive system is the first to be affected. When the dying process begins there is a loss of appetite and thirst. The brain will also lose function and shut down. This is due to a lack of oxygen attributed to labored breathing and the eventual cessation of breathing.
in the last 6 to 12 months before death, people with a pro- gressive, debilitating disease commonly experience certain physical symptoms. many people, as they approach the end of life, will become less active and experience chronic fatigue or weakness. Weight loss and diminished appetite are also common.
Vestibular disease is the main reason why an older dog may experience a sudden loss of balance and an inability to stand or walk normally. How can you tell if a dog has a vestibular disease? A few of the signs include dizziness, stumbling or wobbly steps, and falling over.
The average lifespan for dogs is between 10-13 years, though there is variability among breeds and sizes.
What are the typical signs of pain in dogs? General behaviour: Shaking, flattened ears, low posture, aggression, grumpy temperament, panting or crying, excessive licking or scratching a specific area, reluctant to play, interact or exercise, lameness (limping), stiffness after rest, loss of appetite.
It will look like a severe tummy upset with vomiting and severe abdominal pain. They often drink lots of water too and are off their food. They are all pretty non specific signs really and blood tests are needed to make the diagnosis. Can anything be done to prevent pancreatitis.
Broccoli does not contain large amounts of fat

However, broccoli does not contain a large amount of fat, making it a relatively good treat for your pup. Not all fat is necessarily bad for your dog. However, a large amount of fat could have several consequences for your pet, like obesity problems or acute pancreatitis.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. 12 yr old female black Lab in pain, won’t eat. Can barely walk/sit, rear thighs swollen. Told by vet rotting stomach tissue. Antibiotics didn’t help
ANSWER : A. If your dog is still experiencing the large amount of symptoms listed after care, it may be a good idea to seek a second opinion with another vet, or ask for further testing. The stomach is a necessary part of the body and problems with it such as necrotic tissue can be life-threatening.

Stomach problems do not usually lead to pain in the hind leg, and swelling of the legs or limbs may indicate an injury there instead. Pain in the body can cause pets to become nauseated or ill, which can lead to a loss of appetite, vomiting or lethargy from lack of eating.

Until you can get back to the vet, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and plain white rice may help to soothe minor digestive upset and encourage some eating. However, due to the large amount of symptoms listed, seeking further veterinary care is best.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My pet is sleeping all day, not eating. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. If your pet has had a sudden change in behavior where they are lethargic (sleeping a lot) and not eating, it may be time for a checkup with your vet. Pets can often begin to sleep more and not want to eat if they are not feeling well, have an illness, or may just have some aging related problems such as arthritis. Having your vet take a look can help. Until you can get to the vet, enticing your pet to eat with some bland foods such as warmed up boiled chicken mixed with plain rice, or plain hamburger or turkey may help. These foods are often smelly and exciting to pets, as well as being gentle on upset stomachs. Eating may also help to give your pet some energy back until seeing the vet.

Q. 6 lbs Chi pup, left leg sprain but she is constipated and refusing to eat. Only eats a few bits here and there
ANSWER : A. If your pup has not yet been seen by a vet, it may be a good idea due to the number of symptoms your puppy is experiencing. Leg sprains can be painful, and the pain may be causing nausea or a refusal to eat. Bloating and constipation can be due to a number of things ranging from internal illness, nausea and not feeling well, or even problems with digesting food or having internal parasites. Until you can get to the vet, enticing your pup to eat with a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and plain white rice may encourage some eating and can sometimes help settle an upset stomach.

If she is showing signs of severe distress such as extreme bloating, painful panting or whimpering, blue or pale gums and tongue, loss of consciousness or attempting to vomit or defecate without any results, it may indicate a serious condition called Bloat. This is a medical emergency and should be brought to your vet or ER clinic as soon as possible.

Q. How do I determine how much my overweight pet should weigh?
ANSWER : A. There are many tools to determine overweight and obesity levels in pets. A new tool, morphometric measurements and body fat index, are available to accurately determine a pet’s ideal weight; this will allow an accurate determination of the amount of food a pet should receive to achieve weight loss. Feeding the correct amount will lead to greater weight loss success.

There are many weight loss food options to help pets reach their ideal weight. Your veterinarian can help make a ideal weight recommendation. Here are some tips to help your dog lose weight in a healthy and safe way:

1. Diet: Providing a healthy and well balanced diet is essential to your pet’s overall health. Finding the right food for your dog can be a challenging process. For those overweight animals many commercial dog companies offer weight loss diets, but it is important to evaluate food labels for adequate nutritional content.

You want to ensure you are not missing other essential vitamin or mineral content. Volume of food is also important and the amount of food that works for one breed of dog may not be the same for another breed of dog. Portion control as opposed to free-choice feeding can help your dog to drop a few unnecessary pounds.

There are also prescription weight loss foods designed by veterinary nutritionists, such as Hill’s r/d (http://bit.ly/1AoENSd). Some pet owners find that home cooking is the best option for helping to provide a well-balanced and realistic diet plan. There are websites such as balanceit.com that offers recipes to fit your dog’s specific needs. Consulting with your veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist to find the appropriate diet is a great way to help your dog be as healthy as possible.

2. Exercise: Another great tactic for weight loss for your dog is exercise. Whether this is through running, walking or playing with a favorite toy all of these are wonderful types of exercise to help keep your dog at a lean and healthy weight.

For those pet owners with busy schedules utilizing professional dog walking services or playtime through dog daycare services is another option. It has been shown that those pet owners that exercise regularly with their pets generally live a healthier lifestyle.

3. Physical therapy: As animals age pet owners offer encounter their favorite canine having more difficulty walking and have a dwindling desire to play with toys. Physical therapy, specifically hydrotherapy is a wonderful way to help older and arthritic animals gain more mobility and lose weight. Hydrotherapy has been proven to have several therapeutic effects on the body including, muscle strengthening, relief of swelling, decreased joint pain, less stiffness in limbs, improved circulation, weight loss, and increased tissue healing to name a few. For more information on the benefits of hydrotherapy:
http://bit.ly/1w1qqoy

4. Veterinary visit and blood work: Weight gain can also be related to underlying health concerns such as hypothyroidism or other endocrine disorders. Scheduling a veterinary evaluation and routine blood work can be another important component in increasing the longevity of your dog’s life. Conditions such as hypothyroidism that predispose dogs to gain weight can be treated with a daily medication to improve hormonal balance. If feel that your dog is unnecessarily overweight there can be an underlying health condition that needs to be addressed.

5. Healthy treats: Pet owners love the chance to reward their favorite canine companion with treats and most dogs jump at the chance to consume these delicious products. The problem is many treats, which can include commercial dog treats or table scrapes can add many unnecessary calories to your dog’s daily intake. Reading labels and making note of the calories in these treats is an important component of understanding your dog’s overall health. Treats should not exceed more than 10 percent of your pet’s daily calories. There are healthier treats that can be offered to your pet to keep calories lower yet provide a fuller sensation. A pet owner can add steamed or pureed vegetables, such as carrots, green beans or sweet potato to add more fiber and thus a fuller feeling for your dog.

Q. Why do dogs eat grass?
ANSWER : A. Some pet parents get concerned when they see their favorite canine nibbling on grass in the yard. They wonder whether it is because hunger, boredom or an indication of an underlying illness. Often the consumption of grass will result in vomiting because it irritates the stomach and gastrointestinal tract. This is an extremely common problem for dog parents. There is no one reason for why dogs exhibit these behaviors and it is very much dependent on each dog. Here are some of the reasons why our dogs choose to eat grass:

1. Nutritional Issues

Historically speaking, dogs are considered omnivores, which mean they consume a variety of both meat and plant-based food. There is some indication that dogs with a low fiber diet may choose to scavenge in the grass to fulfill this nutritional deficiency. These dogs may also find that grass has an appealing flavor and consistency. If you feel that this may be the reason for your beloved canine consuming grass then consider discussing with your veterinarian on how to incorporate more fiber into your dog’s diet.

2. Boredom

Many dogs who are not receiving adequate exercise will be become bored and search out activities to occupy their time, including eating grass. Evaluate how much exercise your dog is getting on a daily basis and consider more walks or other fun activities, such as playing fetch or tug of war.

3. Upset Stomach

There is a belief that dogs with an upset or gassy stomach will self-medicate by consuming grass. Vomiting often follows this grass eating activity eliminating the contents of the stomach or changing the gas distension within the gastrointestinal tract. However, there is not much scientific evidence to back up this theory. If you are concerned about too much gastric acid in your dog’s stomach or any other underlying medical issue that could be the reason for their grass eating, consult with your veterinarian.

Overall, grass eating is usually not toxic to your dogs unless your lawn contains chemicals, including pesticides or herbicides. Monitor your dog’s behavior along with his diet and exercise to determine if there is a reason for the inappropriate grass snacking.

Q. How can I train my 4 month old puppy to sit?
ANSWER : A. Training basic commands such as sit is very easy using a positive reinforcement method and does not require any more materials than a place to sit and some very yummy treats! When beginning to teach your dog new tricks, starting off in a distraction free area (such as a quiet room in the house) is best. The training can then expand to more distracting places once your dog has the hang of things.

Start by showing your dog a tasty treat and placing it over his or her nose. When they begin to sniff at the treat, gently move the treat backward. Most dogs will follow the treat with their head, and the backward motion will cause their back ends to sit down! Once your dog sits, reward with the treat and some praise. If your dog tends to walk backwards instead of sit, doing this technique against a wall will prevent your dog from walking backward and encourage sitting.

Once your dog has done this a few times, begin to add the word “sit” every time you put the treat above your dog’s head. Only say the word once, and then continue with the luring motion. Your dog will begin to associate the word with the action after several tries! After this, you can begin to attempt to offer the word “sit” once, and if your dog does so, reward with a treat and praise! If your dog forgets, or appears bored, stop training and try again at a later time- most puppies only have an attention span of a few minutes at most!

Q. Shiba Inu. He periodically shakes and trembles, usually unrpovoked and seeming for no reason. Usually cuddling helps but not always. Becomes reclusive
ANSWER : A. I do find that Shiba Inu’s are a really sensitive breed. I think the first thing to rule out is pain. That could be pain from a muscle injury or even gastrointestinal pain. Try to pinpoint whether it occurs after a meal or not. He might be painful due to something going on in his GI tract, and the pain is at its worse after he eats.

I’ve also seen a lot of small breeds like Shibas get back pain, and shaking can definitely accompany that as well. If you haven’t see your vet who can perform a good physical exam and look for any signs of muscular pain along the spine or elsewhere. It’s not a bad idea at this point to consider doing some blood work just to screen for any problems that could be affecting organ function, for example.

If he’s healthy otherwise, I think it’s likely that there’s something that’s scaring him at home. These things can be really difficult to identify, and you have to be really aware and note exactly when the shaking occurs, how long it lasts, etc, and look for patterns. Dogs can hear things we can’t, and he may be hearing things you’re missing, and the noise is disturbing to him. Cuddling is a good idea, also working to distract him and desensitize him with toys and treats might help. But like I said above – definitely rule out pain first.