better.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should see a vet. It sounds like some infection like malassezia or bacteria. Clinical and dermatological exam should be done to find the cause.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Dogs can develop allergies just like humans, and some of the most common signs are itchy skin and hair loss. The most common allergies in dogs are environmental allergies to irritants like pollen, mold and dust mites, flea allergies and food allergies.
Seborrhea in dogs appears as a dull, dry coat of fur with dandruff and greasy and oily skin. Your dog`s skin may also have an odor, plaque-like, crusty feel, or skin lesions.
Like people, dogs can have an allergic reaction to foods, environmental triggers such as pollen, or to parasites like fleas or mites. Flea bites are behind most dog allergies, however. Along with hair loss from licking and biting the irritated areas, signs of flea allergies include itching and redness.
Mites can cause miserable goat mange: scabbing, itching, hair loss, and anemia. Two differing groups of mites infest goats: those that burrow under the skin and those that remain on the skin`s surface. The two most relevant burrowing mites are Sarcoptes scabiei var caprae and Demodex caprae.
Don`t ignore hair loss in dogs, as it`s often an indicator of infection, parasites or another health issue. If your dog is shedding more hair than normal, or if the hair loss is accompanied by other symptoms, consult your vet to get a full picture of your dog`s health.
Seborrhea, or seborrheic dermatitis, is a skin disorder in which the sebaceous glands of the skin produce an excessive amount of sebum, causing scaly, flaky, itchy, and red skin. Seborrhea typically affects the back, face, and flanks and is worse in the folds of the skin.
There is, unfortunately, no cure for idiopathic seborrhea. However, synthetic vitamin A derivatives, called retinoids, or oral cyclosporine may be helpful in controlling clinical signs in some cases in Cocker Spaniels. The main method for controlling symptoms is by the use of antiseborrheic shampoos.
Oatmeal is an age-old remedy for our dry, itchy skin that happens to be safe for use on our canine friends too! In fact, most doggy hypoallergenic shampoos include oatmeal as an active ingredient to soothe and fight irritation. Start by grinding plain oatmeal into a powder to sprinkle in your dog`s warm bath.
Hyperadrenocorticism (Cushings disease) due to an excess of cortisol production frequently causes the dog to itch, lose hair, have thin skin with dark pigment, drink excessively and have recurring skin problems.
If your goat has irritated skin that has formed crusts that have wrinkled, thickened, and/or lost hair on or under its legs, scrotum, udder, genitals, anus, hooves, ears, face, or other areas without a thick hair coat, it may have mange mites.
Recognizing Anemia in Goats

Like humans, a goat with anemia is going to be lethargic and often have a low appetite. Due to poor circulation, their mucous membranes will appear pale. This is your best indicator of anemia. Gently pull down your goat`s lower eyelid to display the pink underside.

Mites can irritate your dog`s skin, leading to redness and inflammation. You may notice areas of skin becoming reddened or inflamed, especially in regions where mites tend to congregate, such as the armpits, groin, paws, around the eyes, and in the ears.
In localized cases, it shows up as patches of hair loss and red, scaling skin. In generalized cases, the entire body may be covered with redness, infections, scaling, swelling, and crusts. Often the dog loses most, if not all, hair.
Dog mites symptoms

Mite symptoms will vary depending on the species of mite. Demodex mites: Hair loss, skin thickening and skin infections. Sarcoptes mites: Intense itching, hair loss, and skin infections. Ear mites: Scratching around head and ears, head shaking, dark discharge and unpleasant odour from ears.

Be reassured: It`s perfectly normal. Dogs typically lose their winter coat in spring, when it is replaced by a shorter, lighter one for summer. In the fall, this cycle is reversed, as the summer coat is shed to make room for heavy protective winter fur.
Primary seborrhea is an inherited skin disorder. It is seen most frequently in American Cocker Spaniels, English Springer Spaniels, Basset Hounds, West Highland White Terriers, Dachshunds, Labrador and Golden Retrievers, and German Shepherd dogs.
What is pyoderma? Pyoderma is defined as a bacterial skin infection. Pyoderma may also be referred to as impetigo, especially in young puppies.
What is ichthyosis? This is a rare condition in which there is marked thickening of the outer layer of the skin and of the footpads. Affected dogs have rough skin covered with thick greasy flakes or scales that stick to the skin and hair.
DOUXO® is the #1 non-prescription topical brand used and recommended by U.S. veterinarians for dogs and cats with seborrheic dermatological conditions. Keratoseborrheic disorders (also referred to as “seborrhea”) can take on multiple forms.
Seborrhea is not contagious to humans or other pets. However, some underlying diseases that cause seborrhea are contagious. For example, fleas can spread from pet to pet, causing seborrhea in both animals if not treated promptly.
Seborrhea causes your dog`s skin to exude a waxy, smelly substance that is especially noticeable on ears, armpits, and stomachs. Besides producing a foul odor, seborrhea can be uncomfortable to your dog. He or she may start losing clumps of hair.
The mainstay of treatment for seborrheic dermatitis is frequent cleansing. Medicated soaps or shampoos containing zinc pyrithione, selenium sulfide, ketoconazole, sulfur, salicylic acid or tar give additional benefit. These should be applied to the affected area and left on for 5-10 minutes before being rinsed off.
When dog scratching gets out of hand, it is often the result of allergies to food or environmental triggers, including mold and pollen. Dogs may also develop a skin irritation called contact dermatitis when they encounter substances like pesticides or soap. Boredom or anxiety.
Unfortunately, figuring out what`s causing scratching can take time, but there are some at-home remedies — olive oil, coconut oil, and fish oil — that may provide some relief by helping to moisturize your dog`s dry, dandruffy skin.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. 13 yo Lhasa. Greasy, matted hair. Glistening, sweaty skin. Very itchy. Falling out in clumps. Bathe every 10 to 14 days due to problem. Not better.
ANSWER : A. You should see a vet. It sounds like some infection like malassezia or bacteria. Clinical and dermatological exam should be done to find the cause.

Q. What can i do for my puppy? She has really dry flaky skin, she’s a 4 months old Chihuahu
ANSWER : A. Dry and flaky skin can be caused by a large number of things ranging from too-frequent of bathing, allergies or external parasites and illness. If your dog is already on medication to prevent external parasites, it may just be that you are actually bathing your puppy too often.

Bathing more frequently than once every few weeks can actually strip the skin and coat of its natural oils, leading to dry skin and a “dandruff” appearance. Bathing less often and using a soothing shampoo such as oatmeal or sensitive skin can help some. In between baths, a pet wipe or baby wipe can be used to clean dirty areas while allowing the skin and coat to regain its natural oils.

If the skin problem persists, or additional symptoms such as redness, itching or hair loss occur, it may indicate a more serious condition which should be examined by your local vet.

Q. Russian blue mix cat – usually velvet soft coat but hair on back hind qtrs. is thinning, remaining hair seems less velvety than normal
ANSWER : A. Changes in coat appearance can be caused by a number of things. In older cats, hair loss or changes in coat and skin confirmation may indicate a metabolic issue such as thyroid problems. Cats can begin to lose hair and may also show other changes such as weight changes or appetite changes. Blood work is usually done to check for this, and most pets do very well with a daily medication treatment.

Hair loss can also be caused by mites on the skin, external parasites or even skin and fungal infections. These may cause red bumps or sores to appear on the skin in addition to the hair loss and coat changes. Your vet can take a skin scraping of the area to check for mites and infections, and a preventive flea treatment can remove any external parasites. If an infection or mites are present, your vet can also prescribe an antibiotic or topical cream to treat.

After any treatment it may take a month or two for completely bald patches to grow back in. This is normal as the skin and follicles need some time to heal prior to beginning the hair growth cycle again.

Q. We have 2 Boston Terrier mix dogs both female, 6 and 7 y/o. They go to the groomer often and we use an oatmeal shampoo. They seem to scratch a lot!
ANSWER : A. An oatmeal or sensitive skin shampoo is best for the delicate coat and skin a dog has. Bostons and other “smushed nose” breeds can often have itchy skin especially around folds and wrinkles where bacteria can grow. Dogs can also get dry skin if they are bathed too often! Giving a bath less often than every two weeks can help the skin and coat return to better health by allowing the natural coat oils to evenly penetrate the skin. In between baths, and for those wrinkly folds, a pet or baby wipe can help keep the skin clean and free of bacteria and yeast that may cause itchiness.

Read Full Q/A … : Terrier Mix Photos

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. My dog started itching after being spayed. The dog was not itching before being spayed. She does not have fleas. The dog has had 6-7 dog bath shampoos
ANSWER : A. The bathing may be making the problem worse. Dogs should only be bathed if absolutely necessary. So tomorrow is the third day for injections, right? In that case I would be expecting to see improvements by tomorrow when you see your vet. If not then I would be asking for blood tests and depending upon the results of them she may need to be hospitalized on iv fluids. necessary as it strips the skin of its natural oils leading to imbalances which can cause dry, flaky or itchy skin. Leave off bathing for a while and if it continues then you needs to see your vet to establish the cause. It could be external parasites or allergies or a dermatitis. Treatment will vary depending on the cause. Medicated shampoos prescribed by your vet for a particular problem are ok but otherwise try to avoid bathing.

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.