Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You could try a pro biotic paste for the diarrhea but if it continues or the dog is lethargic or showing any other symptoms then you need to see your vet.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

After approximately 2/3 of the kidney tissue is destroyed, there is a rapid rise in waste products in the bloodstream and an apparent sudden onset of severe disease. The clinical signs of more advanced kidney failure include loss of appetite, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and very bad breath.
If your pet is suffering from acute kidney failure, urgent and intensive treatment will be required, often in intensive care at your animal hospital. That said, if spotted early, milder cases of acute kidney failure may be treated with fluids, antibiotics and medications without the need for hospitalization.
To improve fibre in diet and regulate bowels, use Benefibre® powder rather than Metamucil®, as Metamucil® contains potassium. This can help with constipation or diarrhea. You can take Loperamide (Imodium®) tablets for diarrhea in the usual dose. Do not take more than 8 tablets per day.
Fluid therapy includes replacement of various electrolytes, especially potassium. Other important aspects of initial treatment include proper nutrition and drugs to control vomiting and diarrhea. Your dog will often begin to feel better soon after this stage of treatment is begun.
As the disease progresses prognosis worsens and survival time decreases with each stage. Median survival time for Stage 4 kidney disease ranges from 14 to 80 days, according to IRIS.
In our study, the estimated MST of dogs recovering from AKI was 1322 days (95% CI, 1147-1626 days), longer than previously described in veterinary studies.
One of the earliest signs of kidney disease is a marked increase in drinking and urination. Dogs often drink copious amounts of water which is often referred to as polydipsia. Of course, this is logically followed by excessive urination (polyuria).
Your dog will drink excessive amounts of water because as the condition gets worse, his kidneys will not process toxins efficiently and more water will be needed to do the job. Despite the increase in urination, toxins won`t be eliminated as well as they had prior to the kidney disease.
If your dog has kidney issues, they may feel generally unwell, which can manifest itself in various ways. Some of the most common problems are nausea, vomiting, lack of appetite, frequent whining and whimpering, and any of the following symptoms: Excessive sleepiness.
Yes, kidney failure in dogs can be painful. Kidney failure in dogs can be painful because the kidneys are responsible for filtering body waste and toxins. When they fail, these toxins build up in the bloodstream and can cause discomfort and pain.
Do stick with bland foods. One tried-and-true diet for diarrhea is the BRAT diet: bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast. Low in fiber, bland, and starchy, these foods can help replace lost nutrients and firm up your stools.
Bland, starchy, low-fiber foods like those included in the BRAT diet (bananas, bananas, rice, applesauce, toast) are binding, which can bulk stool and help you get rid of diarrhea fast. You can also try probiotics, glutamine supplements, or home remedies like herbal teas and rice water.
Bananas are known for the high levels of potassium they contain, which is vital to protect kidney and heart function, especially in dogs suffering from chronic kidney disease. Potassium also plays a key role in promoting healthy bone density, encouraging muscle development, and regulating fluid levels.
For dogs with renal health issues, feed them a diet of high-quality protein with low phosphorus and sodium, and added omega-3 fatty acids, such as a mix of good quality meat, veggies like bell peppers, and either a supplement of omega-3`s or fish, flax, sardines, or anchovies.
Avoid foods notoriously high in phosphorus and protein: most meats, jerky treats, bully sticks, rawhides, pig ears, antlers and real bones. To stimulate dogs` appetites, you can add sweet items like maple syrup or honey – make sure to incorporate these calories into treat allowances.
Your dog may become very lethargic, or sleepy, and have a hard time rising. They likely have lost a great deal of weight and their appetite is usually diminished. They may be too nauseous to keep food down. Confusion is often a sign of late-stage disease and is caused by the toxins present in the blood stream.
This malfunction leads to a rapid decline of the health of the kidneys themselves as well as the other body systems that the kidneys normally help maintain. While acute kidney failure is very serious, and a pet can become extremely ill, some pets can survive with proper treatment.
Typically, green urine indicates late-stage kidney failure, cancer of the kidneys, or extremely severe urinary tract infection. Urine may turn green because bilirubin makes its way into the kidneys, where it is not supposed to be.
Aluminum hydroxide (brand names: Alternagel®, Amphojel®) is an over-the-counter oral antacid and phosphate binder, most commonly used to treat high phosphate levels secondary to kidney dysfunction (abnormal or impaired function of the kidneys). It can also be used to reduce stomach acid production.
Clinical signs of mild hypophosphatemia include generalized weakness, anorexia, and disorientation, while severe hypophosphatemia can induce life-threatening cardiac arrhythmias, acute respiratory failure, hemolysis, seizures, or coma (3, 6).
Calcium acetate is a better binder of phosphorus than calcium carbonate and the frequency of hypercalcemia is lower with this salt. Calcium salts may be superior to other intestinal phosphate binders if ionized calcium is moderately to severely decreased.
Because kidney disease, particularly in the late stages, can cause a dog to lose their appetite, it can be difficult to encourage your dog to eat enough. Dr. Klein advises, “There are medications used as appetite stimulators available, such as the prescription drug mirtazapine.
Any toxin your dog ingests or is exposed to must be filtered out by the kidneys. You can help your dog avoid excess toxins by giving distilled, reverse osmosis, or even filtered water instead of tap water.
Without dialysis, the life expectancy for stage 5 kidney failure is not a hard and fast answer, as it varies depending on each kidney patient`s unique medical history. Generally, life expectancy without dialysis can be anywhere from days to weeks, which depends on: Amount of kidney function. Severity of symptoms.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. 14 yr old Lab mix diagnosed with kidney failure a year ago has had diarrhea for 24 hours, what can I do for her at home?
ANSWER : A. You could try a pro biotic paste for the diarrhea but if it continues or the dog is lethargic or showing any other symptoms then you need to see your vet.

Q. Home remedies for aging cats with azotemia ?
ANSWER : A. I notice your cat is a Persian, and I’m wondering if she has had an ultrasound done to look at her kidneys and perhaps diagnose the source of her azotemia? Persians frequently have a condition called polycystic kidney disease. The kidneys are misshaped, usually from birth, however the cat frequently doesn’t become clinically ill or have azotemia until many years later.

Really, azotemia, which is the state of having elevated BUN and creatinine on lab work, can be caused by 3 things: dehydration, true renal failure or malfunctioning kidneys, and post-renal causes, which typically means there’s something preventing the cat from eliminating urine (such as a stone in one of the ureters or the urethra.

Assuming your cat has true “renal” azotemia (because the treatments for the other 2 kinds involve addressing either the dehydration or the blockage), there aren’t a lot of remedies, period – much less home remedies. The mainstay of therapy is a prescription diet low in phosphorus and protein, which is available from a vet. Some cats do well with fluids given subcutaneously (under the skin) at home – this helps keep them hydrated and helps the kidneys to function. And there are some supplements, although the true scientific proof that they help is lacking. They’re called Azodyl and Renal Support.

If you want to talk more about your cat’s particular situation we can consult about it.

Q. Wants to go out very frequently. Has fecal matter attached to anus but won’t let me remove it. She won’t sleep and wants to stay on my lap.
ANSWER : A. So I’m hearing a couple of problems going on. Frequent defecation with diarrhea (I’m assuming, since there’s fecal matter attached and the anus, and typically it only “sticks” when it’s soft) and lethargy/clinginess. Pretty general signs, however let’s focus on the diarrhea and assume it’s a GI thing. You didn’t tell me whether this is a cat or dog but I’ll assume dog since you said she goes outside to defecate.

Diarrhea may or may not be a sign of a serious disease. I don’t get especially concerned with one or two episodes in an animal who seems to feel completely normally otherwise, but what you’re describing sounds concerning. Your dog is restless, can’t get comfortable, and is somewhat needy – all of those indicate discomfort to me.

Without knowing how old your dog is it’s pretty difficult to get specific about causes, but I’ll mention some possibilities. Certainly parasites, including giardia, can cause diarrhea, as well as bacterial or viral infections in the gut. Indiscriminate eating, which dogs are master of, can cause diarrhea. Food allergies or sensitivities as well as inflammatory bowel disease are on the list. More serious causes include liver, kidney, or pancreatic disease, as well as intestinal cancers.

I’m hoping this has only been going on for a little while. You can try feeding a bland/high-fiber diet of boiled white meat chicken and white rice (25% chicken and 75% rice) in small (1/4 to 1/2 cup) amounts frequently (every two hours). If the diarrhea doesn’t resolve in 12 hours see a veterinarian. If she’s vomiting or won’t eat at all, see a vet sooner.

Read Full Q/A … : Leerburg

Q. Nursing dog pups 13 days old has sudden onset of diarrhea and vomiting what can I do
ANSWER : A. You can try with holding food for 12 hours. Offer unflavored Pedialyte if she’ll drink. If she doesn’t vomit or have diarrhea for those 12 hours you can then offer small amounts of a bland diet such as boiled white meat chicken (25%) and boiled white rice (75%) without flavoring or fat added. Offer about 1/4 cup every 2 hours. If she continues to do well and has an appetite do this for 12 hours, then transition back to a normal diet slowly. If she continues to have vomiting or diarrhea I think it’s important that you seek veterinary care, since continual loss of fluid through vomiting and diarrhea while nursing is very dangerous to any dog, but especially to a very small dog like a chihuahua.

Q. My veterinarian says my cat is in kidney failure, can you explain what that means?
ANSWER : A. Chronic kidney failure is persistent azotemia for 3 or more months. Azotemia is an excess of urea nitrogen and/or creatinine. The first ability that is lost with the failing kidney is often the kidney’s ability to concentrate the urine. In a cat, the urine becomes both dilute and excessive when 66% of the kidney function has been lost. This change will precede the rise of metabolic waste in the blood (urea- creatinine) which occurs only when approximately 75% of the kidneys are lost. Kidney disease involves a loss of functional renal tissue due to a progressive process that is irreversible.

The aim of treatment is to slow the progression of the kidney’s inability to remove excess metabolic waste. For more information: http://bit.ly/1A19OJw

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. Treatment & diet recommendation for Fanconi disease with stage 3-4 kidney failure
ANSWER : A. I’m sorry you’ve gotten this challenging diagnosis on your dog. The treatment for kidney failure in its acute phase usually centers around what we call “diuresis”, which means hospitalization with fairly aggressive IV fluid therapy in order to help the kidneys “rest” while the extra fluid load flushes toxins from the body, which is the kidneys’ job. Some specialty centers have actual dialysis, which is the mainstay of therapy for human kidney failure but isn’t widely available in veterinary medicine.

Also we try to control and treat the symptoms of the failing kidneys. This usually involves anti-nausea drugs and drugs to control the excess acid in the GI tract.

Sometimes with Fanconi’s syndrome we have to add bicarbonate to the fluids in order to control the blood pH. Potassium supplementation may also have to be given; like pH this depends on the current blood level of potassium. We also sometimes provide amino acid supplementation as well. Basically we are trying to replace what the kidneys are losing.

As far as diet goes we typically feed the standard prescription renal diets, which are low in protein and phosphorus. And as these dogs are susceptible to urinary tract infections it’s recommended to monitor the urine with a urine culture every 6 months, to look for infection.