ly cats.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If she will not feel better within 2 days see avet to check what is causing limping. She probably lost her appetite because of pain connected with the leg. Try to give her wet food or heat her food in the microwave to make it more smelly.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Common Causes of Limping in Cats

Infected or torn nail. Sprained or broken leg caused by trauma (being hit, falling, or landing wrong) Being bitten by a bug or other animal. Something stuck in their paw.

My Cat is Limping

These can include getting something stuck in their pet, an ingrown claw, a sprain or a broken bone. If you notice that your cat is limping, it is always best to bring them into your vet in order to prevent infection and help to stop their condition from growing worse.

Causes of Limping in Cats

There are a variety of reasons why a cat might start limping. It could be something as simple as a muscle strain from playing or jumping too much. But it could also be indicative of a more serious condition such as arthritis, bone cancer, or even heart disease.

Cat Limping May Indicate a Veterinary Emergency

If you notice your cat limping, it could be an injury or other medical condition impacting a muscle, joint, bone, paw, or other tissue. Cat limping can result from trauma like jumping, falling from a high surface, or being hit by a car.

It`s always best to take your cat to the vet if they have a limp in order to avoid the possibility of infection and to help keep their condition from worsening. The cause of your cat`s limp might not be easy to spot but the treatment could be as simple as trimming their claws or removing a tiny splinter from their paw.
If your cat has just developed a slight limp and seems to feel fine otherwise, it`s fine to give it a few days and see if they just have a mild injury that will resolve on its own.
Soak the foot in warm Epsom salts water to relieve swelling. Then apply antibiotic ointment, such as Polysporin. For cut or torn foot pads and broken nails, control the bleeding and treat as described in the handouts “First Aid for Torn or Injured Foot Pads in Cats” and “First Aid for Broken Nails in Cats”.
Limping calici is a form of the virus that causes sudden limping and lameness. While any cat can develop these symptoms, it is far more likely to occur in kittens due to their underdeveloped immune systems. It is also sometimes seen in recently FVRCP vaccinated kittens who are having a reaction to the vaccine.
Symptoms of Sprains and Strains in Cats

Pain—either from directly touching the limb or manipulating it, or other signs attributed to pain such as decreased appetite, reclusiveness, or aggression. Swelling or heat on the limb. Decreased range of motion in the joint. Laxity or instability of the joint.

Natural Pain Relief Options for Cats. When treating pain and inflammation in cats, omega fatty acids and glucosamine can be used in addition to, or in lieu of, traditional pain medications. Heat/ice, laser therapy, chiropractics, physical therapy, massage, and acupuncture can also be very helpful in treating cat pain.
Clinical signs of muscle tears include pain on palpation (examination by touch during a physical exam) of the injured area, lameness or limping, swelling of the muscle, and bruising. The clinical signs may be difficult to detect if the tear is mild.
Some kinds of cat leg injuries, such as soft tissue injuries, may be able to heal on their own. However, others will only get worse if left untreated. As a result, it`s always best to consult your vet if your cat is struggling from a cat leg injury.
A paw lift in cats means something similar to what it means in dogs which is: anticipation. When a cat lifts her paw, something is about to happen. The cat may think that you are going to give her a treat or pet her. She may be about to swat you.
Limping syndrome is caused by FCV infection

Within hours of developing pyrexia, the kittens also developed generalised or localised stiffness, manifesting as shifting lameness in some, and an almost complete reluctance to move in others.

Only two NSAIDs are FDA-approved for cats: meloxicam (sold under several brand and generic names) and robenacoxib (sold under the brand name ONSIOR). Meloxicam is approved for cats as a one-time-only injection to control pain and inflammation after spaying, neutering, and orthopedic surgery.
Cat paw injuries can range from mild to severe, with insect bites, broken paws, and muscle strains potentially to blame. No matter what is going on, it is important to get your cat to the vet so they can receive a proper diagnosis and treatment.
There is a variety of injuries that can cause trauma to the front leg, and they are as varied as the signs your cat can present. Some of the more common ailments include: Strained/pulled muscle. Bone fracture/dislocation.
Cats that are ill will usually show changes in overall appearance, energy level, sociability, coat appearance and/or amount of shedding, appetite, litterbox usage, breathing, or discharges from the eyes or nose. In general, any sudden change should alert you that your cat needs veterinary attention.
Although purring typically indicates happiness in our cats, they also purr to communicate when they are stressed, anxious or trying to communicate other needs, such as if they are in pain or uncomfortable.
Paralysis of a leg often results from damage to the peripheral spinal nerves. Paralysis of a front leg is usually associated with injury to the nerve roots in the neck or shoulder, or injury to the musculocutaneous, radial, median, or ulnar nerve in the leg.
Cats who are in pain may sleep more or less than usual, too. Cats in pain may also seek out warmer places to rest, such as a sunny spot or heating pad. Cats will hardly ever sleep on the floor; they prefer elevated resting spots. If you notice your cat laying in lower places, this can be a warning sign too.
Research suggests that a cat`s purr may have restorative functions. All felines purr in the range of 25 to 150 hertz, which corresponds to frequencies used in therapeutic healing for bone growth, wound healing, and pain relief, according to one study.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. 20 month old female cat has been limping on her left front leg since last nite. No visible signs of injury. Not eating. One of two indoor only cats.
ANSWER : A. If she will not feel better within 2 days see avet to check what is causing limping. She probably lost her appetite because of pain connected with the leg. Try to give her wet food or heat her food in the microwave to make it more smelly.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. My cat is one year old. He has diarrhea, not eating last for one day. This problem is too with my other 2 cats and one is died.
ANSWER : A. His not eating is the most concerning for me. They cannot go more than a few days without eating or they risk liver damage. Your cat needs to be seen by your vet for an exam and bloodwork to determine the cause for your cat’s loss of appetite. Based on the findings, your vet will be able to give you a clearer picture of what is going on with your cat and be able to offer you treatment options.

Try enticing your pet to eat with beef or chicken baby food that does not contain onion or garlic powder. Onion and garlic causes anemia. Warm it in the microwave for a few seconds. Stir it with your finger first to make sure there are no hot spots and that it isn’t too hot. This makes it more aromatic and appealing to your pet. Wetting dry food or mixing wet food with low sodium chicken broth, also warmed, might entice your pet to eat. Some cats like to be petted while they eat, some want to be left alone. You’ll know your cat’s habits and be able to act accordingly.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. We have two female cats who are sisters. One was just diagnosed with generalized lymphoma. Is there risk of being contageous? What kind of food
ANSWER : A. Lymphoma is a cancer and not a bacteria or virus, so it cannot be spread from cat to cat via contact. However, if your cats are related, they may both be genetically predisposed to getting the same type of cancer. Feline lymphoma can also sometimes be caused by the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) which CAN be spread from cat to cat. The spread of these viruses is usually through bite wounds, saliva or fecal and urine matter, and the chances of spread among two amicable cats is lower, however testing both cats is always good.

As lymphoma can cause a decrease in appetite, sometimes the best food is one that will keep your cat on her normal eating routine so that she keeps her weight and energy up. Enticing her to eat by warming up wet foods, or even moistening and warming dry foods may encourage continued normal eating and may prevent weight loss from loss of appetite. A high-fat, high protein and low carbohydrate diet (such as a grain-free diet) may also help by providing a more calorie and nutrient dense meal so that every bite is beneficial.

Q. Aggressive young cat attacking my other cat?
ANSWER : A. Aggression among cats can be a sign of stress, especially if one cat has just been introduced, or if the other cat is overly curious/friendly toward the scared one. The best first step is to make sure each cat has their own separate “spaces” where they can go to get away from harassment from the other cat. Up-high bedding, quiet rooms, etc can all help. Make sure each cat also has their own litter box and food/water bowls as cats often do not like to share and this can be a point of aggression between them. Lastly, placing pheromone diffusers or pheromone calming collars on one or both cats may help decrease stress and aggression through the use of cat calming pheromones. Fel-i-way is one of the most common brands.

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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