Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. There are always risks with the anaesthetics , however the surgery is quite straight forward and the best thing is to have it removed. I guess you’ ll know more after the tumour has been sent for histology ( to a Lab that can tell you the nature of the tumour ).

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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About half of the dogs with malignant tumors also have an excellent prognosis with surgery alone. The remaining 50% of dogs with malignant tumors are at risk for the spread of their tumor. This leads to illness and poor quality of life, with survival times usually less than one year.
According to the blog Canine Cancer Awareness, “Half of all tumors are malignant and unfortunately, 50-75% of them will kill the dog by recurrence or spreading (metastasizing) to the lungs within 1-2 years.”
Patients go home the day of or the day after surgery. They need 2-3 weeks of recovery, confinement and an Elizabethan collar. Antibiotics and pain medication are prescribed for about 1 week. Stitches are removed after about 2 weeks.
Whilst surgery is a vital life-saving tool, sometimes even the best surgeon cannot cure the patient, because of the nature of the cancer. This means the dog may either grow new tumors in a different place, the cancer may spread internally, or the tumor regrows.
Summarily, we found that most female dogs (58%) developed a new tumor in the remaining ipsilateral mammary tissue after removal of a solitary mammary tumor by regional mastectomy.
On average, breast cancers double in size every 180 days, or about every 6 months.
Canine Mammary Tumors

The median age on presentation is 10 – 11 years. Dogs fed a high-fat diet or overweight at one year of age are at increased risk of developing mammary gland tumors. Appropriate early treatment, even if the tumor is malignant, is often curative.

More than a quarter of unspayed female dogs will develop a mammary tumor during their lifetime. The risk is much lower for spayed female dogs, male dogs, and cats of either gender. In female dogs, 50% of mammary tumors are benign and 50% are malignant. However, few of the malignant mammary tumors are fatal.
Mammary (or breast) tumors are common in female dogs, but rare in male dogs and cats. Surgical removal is recommended for most mammary tumors.
While a dog`s fundamental personality will not change after a spay or neuter surgery, there are some changes you might observe, including: Behavioral changes are more pronounced among neutered males. They`re less likely to hump people, other dogs, and inanimate objects (though many persist).
Age is not a disease, and your dog is never “too old” to receive the quality care he or she needs, even if it requires anesthesia and surgery.
Daily Incision Monitoring: Monitor the incision for any severe redness, discharge, or swelling. Mild swelling and redness are normal and part of the healing process. If you notice that your pet is lethargic or inappetant, please call Sylvan Veterinary Hospital immediately.
Approximately 45% of mammary tumors are malignant in dogs, whereas ~90% are malignant in cats, and dogs have a much higher number of complex and mixed tumors than do cats.
The prognosis depends on the size, location, and invasiveness of your dog`s tumor. Small, non-invasive tumors often cause few or no issues for dogs, but larger, more invasive tumors, or those that interfere with normal body functions, can cause life-threatening complications, and have a poorer prognosis.
T1 (includes T1a, T1b, and T1c): Tumor is 2 cm (3/4 of an inch) or less across. T2: Tumor is more than 2 cm but not more than 5 cm (2 inches) across. T3: Tumor is more than 5 cm across. T4 (includes T4a, T4b, T4c, and T4d): Tumor of any size growing into the chest wall or skin.
T1: The tumor is 2 cm or less in diameter. T2: The tumor is more than 2 cm but less than 5 cm across. T3: The tumor is larger than 5 cm in width. T4: The tumor can be of any size but is growing into the chest wall or skin.
“Pain is a rather substantial sign of cancer,” says Zaidel. If your dog whines or cries out when you pat her tummy or pick him up, call your vet. Mouth tumors may cause noticeable discomfort when eating.
Most of the signs of breast cancer are related to the tumors themselves and are located on one of the eight to ten mammary glands present on most female canines. The majority of tumors are found near the mammary glands closest to the back legs. Signs can include: Bloody discharge or pus from nipple.
It could appear as a hard or soft lump in the mammary gland area. At first, it will be covered with skin and hair. If advanced it could burst and look like an abscess . It is important for every owner of a female dog check out mammary area for lumps regularly since this is a frequently occurring cancer in canines.
Stage 1 (T1N0M0): Tumor is less than 3 cm, no metastatic disease regionally/distantly. Stage 2 (T2N0M0): Tumor is between 3-5 cm in size; no metastatic disease regionally/distantly. Stage 3 (T3N0M0): Tumor is >5 cm in size; no metastatic disease regionally/distantly.
In dogs, the most common type of malignant skin cancer is a mast cell tumor. These tumors are superficial lumps that can be painful. They often swell, frequently bleed and then scab over, only to bleed again a few days later. They should not be squeezed by the owner, as squeezing can make them swell even more.
Mast cell tumors are quite serious when identified in dogs. If untreated they can cause anaphylactic shock or if they progress into a more aggressive form they can metastasize and ultimately lead to death.
Mammary tumors can be a single tumor located at one nipple or they may be found as a chain of tumors, running along the mammary glands. If a mammary tumor grows large, it can ulcerate (open and bleed) and in severe cases, may rupture and cause significant pain and discomfort.
If you find any new lumps or bumps – particularly in a senior pet or a pet that has a history of skin tumors – see your veterinarian to get them checked out. It`s easier to remove a mass when it is small, so it`s best to address any new lumps as soon as possible.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. 5 year old pug getting mammary tumor removed today. What can go wrong and what are the chances?
ANSWER : A. There are always risks with the anaesthetics , however the surgery is quite straight forward and the best thing is to have it removed. I guess you’ ll know more after the tumour has been sent for histology ( to a Lab that can tell you the nature of the tumour ).

Read Full Q/A … : Surgical Risk – VetInfo

Q. Husband shamed dog for having an accident inside, and now she won’t poop when he takes her out. Can we fix this? He realizes he erred
ANSWER : A. Good on your husband for realizing that scolding is not the way to potty train! Hopefully these tips can help both him and your pup get back on the right track and make pottying outside successful.

If your dog is still a puppy, that is good news as you may be able to more easily time your potty outings with your dog’s schedule. Even if your dog is older, this schedule may help. Dogs generally have to go potty about 15 minutes after eating, drinking, waking up or playing. Knowing this, get your husband to start taking out your puppy at these key times, so puppy gets used to going out with him, and the urge to potty may be higher than any fear to go. If the potty is successful, have your husband reward the dog with a favorite treat! For bowel movements, dogs may take a little more time, and you may have to stand outside for a while (sometimes even 10 minutes) to give your dog a chance to go. If she doesn’t go, take her back inside and play some, then try again in about 15 minutes. Again, a success equals a treat which most dogs will like right away!

For any indoor potty accidents that occurred, an enzymatic cleaner is great for cleaning up urine and stool. Not only does it remove the stain and smell, but it breaks down the enzymes in the urine and stool your dog can smell, which may deter her from going potty there again.

Q. He has a malignant tumor the size of a small grapefruit on the left side of liver what homopathyic steps can I take to help him or surgery an option
ANSWER : A. I’m assuming the tumor was diagnosed on ultrasound, and a needle aspirate was taken to diagnose the type of tumor? If that hasn’t been done it should be – lots of tumors, especially the big ones, aren’t malignant, and may not cause any big problems if left alone. So let’s start there – get a needle biopsy done if possible.

If you definitely have a diagnosis of “cancer”, and the tumor is confined to one area or “lobe” of the liver, it may absolutely be surgically resectable, which may provide a complete cure. I would discuss this option with a very capable surgeon, perhaps one who is board certified if available, and proceed if he/she thinks the whole tumor can be removed.

Unfortunately I can’t think of any natural or homeopathic treatments that could be helpful. I think first you have to know the tumor is dangerous and then consider removing it, if possible.

Read Full Q/A … : pharm nclex Flashcards

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. Hi my dog breast is swollen what i do
ANSWER : A. If your pet is not spayed or was spayed after 1-2 years of age there is a chance that this swelling could be mammary cancer. Mammary cancer in pets is common and the chances of cancer are decreased an the risk of getting cancer is only 0.5% if spayed before the 1st heat cycle, 8% if spayed before the 2nd heat cycle, 26% if spayed by the 3rd heat cycle. After the 3rd heat cycle spaying a pet will not decreased chances of mammary cancer.
I would highly advise that you take your pet tot he vet to have this area examined. Typically mammary cancer lumps are firm and can be on multiple breasts.
Without seeing the lump myself, another possibility here is a lipoma (soft fatty tumor) or an abscess.

Q. My cocker spaniel is 9 years old. He has involuntary bowel movements (little drops) very frequently, especially when he is asleep.
ANSWER : A. Is your dog on a senior dog food? I would get your dog on a high quality high protien dog food. Ask a pet store assosicate or your regular vet for a food recommendation. When you buy a better food the dog will have to eat less to get the same amount of energy from the food. The dog has to eat more of the cheaper foods to get the energy it needs from it. Meaning more poop and buying more food. So the cost really evens out. So the lessen your dogs bowel movements get on a better senior dog food. Next talk to your vet they may have a recommendation. If you switch dogs do it slowly by mixing the foods. Start with 10% new 90% old mixed for at least a week until you have switched to 100% new 0% old. Senior foods have more fiber to help with bowel movements. Take the dog outside to go potty more frequently, right before bed time.

Read Full Q/A … : Symptoms Questions & Answers

Q. Our 6 yr old Pitt retriever mix got a small mast cell tumor removed from her chest 3 days ago. Today she has a rash near the incision site, thoughts?
ANSWER : A. Mast cell tumors tend to release histamine to the tissues around the tumor, sometimes that can cause itchiness and rash around the wound, even bleeding called Darier’s sign. If they removed enough tissue around the tumor calm down and go tomorrow to your vet that possibly will give you some tablets to improve that reaction, normally steroids.

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.