Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Crate training is definitely the easiest way to train a dog. Crate him whenever you cannot watch him to prevent accidents indoors. Whenever you take him out, keep him out until he poops. If he does not poop, put him back in the crate and try again in 30 minutes. He is not allow free range of the house until he poops and pees outside. When he does praise him and allow him to play outside of the crate. Also, feeding him twice a day at scheduled intervals will help you create a schedule for him because you will know when he has eaten and when he has to poop.

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To speed up your puppy`s process in outdoor potty training, reward your pup with praise and a treat every time they go potty when you let them out. The praise and treat will reinforce the idea to your puppy that they have a potty spot outdoors. Reward successes with praise, pets and their favorite treat!
Puppies have small bladders. Most Yorkie puppies can only last a couple of hours without going outside. Adult Yorkies have stronger bladders, but it is still a good idea to take your pup outside regularly while you are house training.
One of the biggest potty training fails is if you don`t take your dog out at the same time each day, or pick up on their cues that they need to go quickly enough. You need to ensure your dog is given the chance to go after they have had a meal or drunk a large amount of water, after excessive playtime or after sleep.
The reason puppies hold on outside and then pee immediately once they get back in is that the house is their happy place and the yard is not. As soon as they come inside, their parasympathetic tone increases and only then do they feel the urge to urinate. Your job is simple in theory: make outside a happy place too.
Take your puppy outside frequently—at least every two hours—and immediately after they wake up, during and after playing, and after eating or drinking. Pick a bathroom spot outside, and always take your puppy (on a leash) to that spot.
It typically takes 4-6 months for a puppy to be fully house trained, but some puppies may take up to a year. Size can be a predictor. For instance, smaller breeds have smaller bladders and higher metabolisms and require more frequent trips outside.
Let your Yorkie know that outside is the place to go. Inside the house, when you see your Yorkie relieving himself say a firm “No!” and then take him outside immediately. Another effective housebreaking method is crate training. Housebreaking can be accomplished much faster with minimum hassle.
The first thing to do when a previously house trained dog begins urinating or defecating inside is to rule out any medical problems. Urinary tract infections, cystitis (bladder inflammation), bladder stones, kidney disease, or arthritis or age-related incontinence could all be causes of house soiling in dogs.
The primary reason why Yorkies are difficult to house train has everything to do with the size of a Yorkie`s bladder. Yorkshire terriers are already small dogs as it is, and with a smaller frame comes a smaller bladder, as well as other internal organs.
Teach your dog to use the same outside area each time. Put your dog in a particular spot and encourage him by saying “go for it!” then follow up with a treat. After 2-4 weeks your puppy will go to that spot on his own. Always take a puppy outside for a “potty break” before leaving him alone in your home.
Do: Watch the Clock. Give your puppy 15 minutes to do his business. If nothing happens, put him in his crate for another 15 minutes before trying again. If it`s first thing in the morning, he will need to do both #1 and #2—so if he only urinates, return him to his crate for 15 minutes and try again.
One of the easiest ways to train a dog to go only in one spot is to train it to go on command. Take your dog on a leash to the spot you want it to use, and say the cue word. Keep the dog in that spot until it goes, then offer a reward. Only reward the dog when it goes in that particular spot.
One simple explanation could be your pet isn`t fully potty-trained. It`s possible your dog has learned to pee outside first, but hasn`t grasped the concept of where exactly to poop. If you think this might be the case, be sure to give your dog lots of time and praise while outdoors.
Remember, puppies can`t control their bladder until they`re about 16 weeks old. After that, in general they can only hold their bladder for the same number of hours as the number of months of their age plus one.
Like much of their body, a puppy`s bladder isn`t yet fully developed. Many puppies can only hold their urine for short periods. Frequent accidents could be the result of an overly full bladder, especially if your puppy doesn`t yet recognize the importance of going potty in a designated spot or area.
The answer is straight forward, practical and in all honesty, super simple. In short: Make it really easy for you to monitor your dog. Take your dog out when it`s the right time and praise when things go right and finally, make a schedule. That`s all you really need to potty train your dog.
The short answer is: no. While it`s usually harder to train an older dog than a puppy, it`s never too late to train a dog — you just have to be willing to put in the time, patience and determination required to create boundaries, establish new habits and eliminate destructive behaviors.
Your puppy clearly did need to go potty, but he was likely too overstimulated outside. He feels safe and relaxed indoors, which triggers him to release his bladder. The key is to make sure his outdoor time is safe, structured, and a little bit boring.
Make sure your dog goes outside to potty before bed-even if that means they have to go on a walk. Give HUGE praise when they do anything they are supposed to. Create a nighttime routine: TV off, hallway light off, outside light off, etc. This will let them know that they have to go potty because you are headed to bed.
Providing Yorkies with treats, pets, cuddles, and playtime for a job well done encourages them to keep up the good work. Another training method to consider is clicker training, in which you mark good behavior by depressing a handheld clicking device that emits a short clicker sound.
While young Yorkie puppies must be taken out once every 1-2 hours during the potty training process, Yorkie adults who are fully potty-trained should be able to hold it for 8 hours. Although healthy adult Yorkies can probably hold it in for longer (10-12 hours), they should NOT be expected to do so.
Yes, an older dog can absolutely be potty trained. In fact, house training an adult dog can actually be easier than house training a puppy. This is because adult dogs are more likely more used to holding in their pee, so getting accumulated to a bathroom schedule may be easier for them.
So, if three-day potty training doesn`t work this time, try not to get too frustrated, because it may work soon, or you might find a completely different approach is better for you and your child. If you want to try the three-day method again, look to schedule another weekend two to three months down the road.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Any potty training tips for yorkies? Peeing outside is downpat but he doesn’t seem to understand that he should be pooping outside too.
ANSWER : A. Crate training is definitely the easiest way to train a dog. Crate him whenever you cannot watch him to prevent accidents indoors. Whenever you take him out, keep him out until he poops. If he does not poop, put him back in the crate and try again in 30 minutes. He is not allow free range of the house until he poops and pees outside. When he does praise him and allow him to play outside of the crate. Also, feeding him twice a day at scheduled intervals will help you create a schedule for him because you will know when he has eaten and when he has to poop.

Q. My dog is house trained but has started pooping in the house, why is she doing that?
ANSWER : A. It could be the type of food you are feeding. If you are feeding a lower quality kibble, it will be packed with fillers. These fillers will cause your dog to poop more than is necessary, and it can cause your dog to poop indoors because of the excess poop. Finding a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Orijen, or a high quality food like Ziwipeak, or Honest Kitchen, will help with that issue.

Remember to NEVER scold for accident indoors. The more you scold, the more fearful your dog is of pooping in front of you, the less your dog will want to poop in front of you outdoors, the more he will poop indoors, the more you scold… it’s a vicious cycle.

Have you been cleaning messes with Nature Miracle? Pick up a bottle, and try cleaning with that instead of regular cleaner. It will eliminate the smells deep down (even to your dog), which will discourage him from potting in that spot again.

Maybe he needs to be taken outside more often, and maybe he needs to be kept outside longer each time. He should be allowed at least 10 minutes of roaming outside before he has to come back inside. Allow him 10 minutes every single time you bring him outside, just in case he has to poop. He needs every opportunity you can give him. Bring him outside every hour if he’s full grown, every 40 minutes if he’s an adolescent (6-10 months), and every 30 minutes if he’s a puppy (2-6 months). If you have a doggy door, you should still be bringing your dog outside yourself to encourage him to stay outside longer, and poop. When he does poop outside, you should praise him, and reward him with lots of treats!

Q. How do I desensitize my dog to squirrels and stray cats in the neighborhood?
ANSWER : A. It depends on the goal that you have in mind. I am going to assume that you would prefer that your dog not chase squirrels or stray cats in the yard/street. In this case, your options include: (1) training your dog on a “Leave it ” cue using positive reinforcement methods, (2) training your dog not to pull on its leash when it sees a squirrel/stray cat, and (3) training your dog to perform a more desirable behavior when it sees a squirrel/cat.
Training your dog on a cued “leave it” command is useful because it will give you the ability to tell your dog to stay away from any number of undesirable objects on your command. Training your dog to perform a more desireable behavior when it sees a squirrel or cat will substitute a behavior you find acceptable (sitting, laying down, coming to the door, etc.) with a behavior you dislike. Your dog can still react, just in a positive way. If your dog pulls on the leash every time you see a squirrel/cat, training not to pull will make your walk safer and more pleasant.
The ideal training method to use with dogs, or any animal for that matter, is positive reinforcement training, particularly a method called “clicker- training.” The basic concept of positive reinforcement training is to pair a reward (reinforcement) with a behavior you want to increase in frequency. In other words, when your dog performs the behavior you desire, it receives an award, which reinforces the desired behavior so you get more of that behavior. There are many excellent books in stores or on-line that describe positive reinforcement training in detail and many give step-by-step instructions for training common commands like “leave it”. Look for books that specifically mention positive reinforcement training or clicker-training. You can also take dog training classes to learn the techniques, find a mentor who already uses clicker-training, or request a consult from one of the pet experts on this site to guide you.

Q. We have a 7 week old Toy Poodle/Bichon. We are trying to house train her, any tips would be appreciated. Thanks.
ANSWER : A. It’s understandable that she isn’t able to hold her bladder all that well yet. The bladder doesn’t fully develop until around 6-7 months of age. For now, you should be bringing your pup outside every 30 minutes, immediately after she eats/drinks, immediately after she plays, immediately after a nap, immediately after training.

Is she crate trained? If she is not crate trained, I have some wonderful crate training exercises I could go over. Crate training and potty training go hand-in-hand. Any time you cannot keep your eyes on the puppy, she should be in the crate so accidents do not occur. The main idea when it comes to potty training is to keep your puppy successful.

After a while of bringing her outside every 30 minutes, you can try to increase that time. What you should do is wait until the 30 minute marker strikes, and then begin some basic obedience using treats, or some puppy-play! Then go out a few minutes later. Teach her it’s fun to hold her bladder!

Q. Husband shamed dog for having an accident inside, and now she won’t poop when he takes her out. Can we fix this? He realizes he erred
ANSWER : A. Good on your husband for realizing that scolding is not the way to potty train! Hopefully these tips can help both him and your pup get back on the right track and make pottying outside successful.

If your dog is still a puppy, that is good news as you may be able to more easily time your potty outings with your dog’s schedule. Even if your dog is older, this schedule may help. Dogs generally have to go potty about 15 minutes after eating, drinking, waking up or playing. Knowing this, get your husband to start taking out your puppy at these key times, so puppy gets used to going out with him, and the urge to potty may be higher than any fear to go. If the potty is successful, have your husband reward the dog with a favorite treat! For bowel movements, dogs may take a little more time, and you may have to stand outside for a while (sometimes even 10 minutes) to give your dog a chance to go. If she doesn’t go, take her back inside and play some, then try again in about 15 minutes. Again, a success equals a treat which most dogs will like right away!

For any indoor potty accidents that occurred, an enzymatic cleaner is great for cleaning up urine and stool. Not only does it remove the stain and smell, but it breaks down the enzymes in the urine and stool your dog can smell, which may deter her from going potty there again.

Q. My nine weeks old puppy keeps peeing inside the house but not outside, is this normal?
ANSWER : A. Remember that your pup is just a tiny little baby. He does not know the rules of the world, and needs to be taught through calm, patient, positive guidance.

You should be bringing him outside so often that he doesn’t have the chance to potty indoors. It is up to you to keep the puppy successful. Bring the pup outside at least every 30 minutes, plus immediately after eating, drinking, training, playing, napping and sleeping. Make sure each time you bring him outside, you stay outside for at least ten minutes to give him a chance to really potty. Immediately AFTER he finishes pottying outdoors, reward him with praise and treats.

If he urinates indoors, do not scold him or you run the risk of making him afraid to pee in front of you, which will make potty training so much more challenging, so DO NOT SCOLD.

Q. Are Yorkie Poos alright to be left alone some of the day and are they easily house trained
ANSWER : A. They are not very easily house trained, no. Yorkie’s have small bladders, and tend to drink more than other small breed dogs. Yorkie’s need to be on a very strict pottying schedule. When they’re puppies, they should be brought outside every 30 minutes when they’re out of their crates, and when they are in their crates the “rule of thumb” is one hour per month of age, plus one (until they ABSOLUTELY HAVE TO potty). Crate training is extremely important when it comes to raising a puppy, especially one who has notorious issues with potty training.

I could go over a crate training exercise for you so you can start crate training right away. Crate training is a very SLOW, careful, and positive process. It needs to be handled very delicately to ensure the puppy has a positive experience.

Of course dogs are alright to be left alone some of the day. About as long as the “rule of thumb” allows, and absolutely no longer than 8 hours (as I find that just cruel). Crating ensures dogs safety.

Q. What is the best way to train your dog on a pee pad? He can go on the pee pad if I bring him to the pad if I don’t he makes an accident.
ANSWER : A. Train your dog using a positive reinforcement method. Since your dog will use the pad when you bring it to him, reward him immediately for urinating on the pad. First, teach your dog to associate the word “good” with a treat (or use a special device called a “clicker” in place of a verbal “good”). Then, say “good” or “click” when you dog urinates on the pee pad and reward him as soon as he finishes. Repeat this training over and over until your dog understands that peeing on the pad equals reward. Then, begin to move the pad away from your dog and bring him to the pad wherever it is. Again, reward when he goes on the pad. It is all about making it “fun” to pee on the pad (reward) and not fun to pee anywhere else (no reward). To learn more about “clicker training” and/or positive reinforcement training, I recommend purchasing a good book on training using positive reinforcement techniques. Or, I or another of the experts on this site, would be happy to consult with you to guide you through the steps and make this a positive experience for both you and your dog.