Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I am very familiar with Bulkdog skin problems ! I have had a few Bulldogs myself. We need a bit more information on the skin lesions, when they started, what flea & skin parasites treatment you use, diet and if you bathe him which products you use.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Sulfate-free, organic, hypoallergenic shampoo can help calm your dog`s irritated skin; additional ingredients like aloe vera and hydrocortisone are anti-inflammatories that also aid in reducing itchiness and inflamed skin. For hot spots and lesions, an organic spray or antihistamines and topical creams can help.
All breeds of dogs can develop skin issues, but Bulldogs are predisposed to developing them. Their wrinkles may be cute, but they are breeding grounds for bacteria and yeast due to the moist conditions. If you do not keep your dog`s wrinkles clean, and even if you do, he can develop severe skin issues.
Bulldogs and French Bulldogs Yeast Infection of the ears, skin, toes, tail fold, and vaginal folds are very common to the breed. The yeast bug is called Malassezia and is a normal part of your bulldog skin and ears microflora.
Coconut oil can add moisture to your dog`s skin and prevent flaking. It also helps freshen up a dog`s coat if used with a light touch. To use it topically, simply rub a very small amount onto your hands and then gently pat the coat, run your fingers through the fur, and massage a little down onto the skin.
Regular bathing of your bulldog – generally once every six to eight weeks – is highly recommended. Always carefully clean between your bulldog`s folds and thoroughly dry your dog afterwards. Don`t give your dog baths too frequently, however, or their skin could become dry.
Two major problems to be aware of are skin fold dermatitis (also called intertrigo) and pyoderma (bacterial skin infection). When detected and then properly treated, your bulldog can have a happy, healthy life.
The bumps often appear on your dog`s muzzle, chin, elbows, and hocks (or ankle joint). In most cases, pyoderma is caused by a bacterial infection on your dog`s skin, but allergies, parasites, and in rare cases, cancer can also cause this condition.
In the early stages of a yeast infection, the skin begins to turn pink or red. When dealing with chronic yeast infections, the skin may become leathery, thick, and gray or black. Greasy skin. The skin can become greasy or excessively oily.
Bacterial & Fungal Skin Infection in Dogs. Bacterial and fungal infections can have your dog feeling itchy, with skin that appears flaky, crusty or moist. Redness, inflammation and odor may also be a problem, not to mention recurring health concerns when it comes to yeast dermatitis or staph infection.
Technically no, vaseline is not toxic to your dog. It is also usually not the best choice as your dog can lick it off their skin or paws. If your pup ingests enough they might get an upset stomach, which can lead to vomiting or diarrhea if they ingest enough.
While Vaseline is technically non-toxic for dogs, it does not mean it is 100% safe. If over-ingested (and they will lick) it can cause an upset stomach, which can lead to vomiting or diarrhoea. Vaseline forms a barrier over your dog`s skin trapping in toxins, dirt and bacteria.
Apple cider vinegar is made from just apples and water, making it completely safe for dogs. It is slightly acidic, with a pH of 3.1 to 5, which gives it properties that can soothe a dog`s overly alkalized digestive tract.
To use coconut oil topically, apply it to the skin about once a week, and let it be absorbed for a few minutes. After five minutes or so, rinse your dog off. If he still feels excessively greasy or oily, you can follow up with a light shampoo and rinse. Alternatively, use a shampoo made with organic coconut oil.
A Bulldog does require regular bathing and grooming. This kind yet courageous dog can be bathed as frequently as every week up to no more than every six weeks depending on his lifestyle. With this smooth coated breed, regular bathing is essential to maintain healthy skin and coat.
If your bulldog has a sensitive stomach or itchy skin, you need dog food that`s formulated to meet those needs. American Journey Limited Ingredient Grain-Free Venison & Sweet Potato Recipe is made with a single protein source and doesn`t contain any of the common allergens like corn, wheat, or soy.
Eczema is the most common skin problem in bulldogs.
The main causes of dermatitis in dogs are: Parasites: Fleas, mites, ticks. Infections: Bacterial or fungal. Allergies: Environmental (such as pollen, grass, dust mites) or food.
Can My Dog Be Allergic to Rice? Yes, your dog can react badly to rice and as soon as it should the following sign, you should withdraw rice from its diet. You`ll notice either vomiting or itchy skin. Other signs include; inflamed paws, dry skin, skin rash, and hair loss.
Ringworm characteristically appears in a circular or ring-shaped pattern on the skin, usually causing the skin to turn red, lose hair, and swell up.
Topical ingredients that are effective in treating yeast include chlorhexidine, miconazole, and ketoconazole. In difficult-to-treat or severe cases, oral antifungal medications are used. Oral antifungal medications used in dogs include fluconazole, terbinafine, ketoconazole, and itraconazole.
Just like in people, certain foods may not agree with your pet`s particular digestive system. When some dogs eat ingredients such as chicken, wheat, corn or other individual items, ingestion will trigger an allergic reaction that can alter the natural flora and allow an unnatural growth of yeast.
Clean the infection or wound

Topical antibacterial soaps and shampoos can help such as KetoChlor Shampoo or Malapet Shampoo. It is often necessary to shampoo pets once to twice a week, while also using any prescribed antibiotic therapy for maximal chances of recovery.

Chamomile and Herbal Tea Soaks

Chamomile, calendula, and green tea have properties that soothe and cool irritated skin and reduce inflammation, making them great additions in a dog bath for itchy skin. These soaks are best for dogs who have hot, itchy patches of skin that are at risk of getting rubbed raw.

In some dogs that develop signs, the disease will resolve without treatment. However, if chronic respiratory signs occur or the infection involves many body organs and tissues, longterm antifungal treatment is needed. In cases where the infection has spread, treatment of at least 6 to 12 months is typical.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. What can i do for my puppy? She has really dry flaky skin, she’s a 4 months old Chihuahu
ANSWER : A. Dry and flaky skin can be caused by a large number of things ranging from too-frequent of bathing, allergies or external parasites and illness. If your dog is already on medication to prevent external parasites, it may just be that you are actually bathing your puppy too often.

Bathing more frequently than once every few weeks can actually strip the skin and coat of its natural oils, leading to dry skin and a “dandruff” appearance. Bathing less often and using a soothing shampoo such as oatmeal or sensitive skin can help some. In between baths, a pet wipe or baby wipe can be used to clean dirty areas while allowing the skin and coat to regain its natural oils.

If the skin problem persists, or additional symptoms such as redness, itching or hair loss occur, it may indicate a more serious condition which should be examined by your local vet.

Q. For the past few months my dog has slowly licked most all of his hair off his legs and lower belly. The skin is now dotted with red sore spots.
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

Q. My dog keeps scratching all day long. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

It could potentially be fleas, allergies to a type of food you are feeding him, seasonal allergies, or dry skin. Dry skin is typically caused by too many baths, which don’t allow essential oils to build up on the dog’s skin, or could also be related to his diet.

If this is the case, you might want to try feeding him a higher quality food, or try purchasing some salmon oil pumps for dogs. These are added to dogs’ meals and usually make their skin look and feel healthier rather quickly.

However, it is impossible to determine what the exact cause is without proper physical examination. Therefore, my main suggestion is to have your dog examined by your vet in order to determine the underlying cause and the necessary treatment.

Q. My dog keeps licking himself in different areas, what does this mean?
ANSWER : A. Licking and fretting is part of a normal dog’s grooming behavior. It only becomes a problem when your pet does it in excess or carries it to the extreme.

In most of cases excessive nibbling is related to skin diseases. Problems like skin allergy, parasites, infections, anal glands problems usually results in excessive itchiness.

In rare cases skin irritation can be a result of internal disease like liver problems or even a tumor.

Excessive licking and chewing should be promptly treated as dog dogs will self-inflict skin scratches and wounds which could be easily avoided if treatment is not delayed.

Read Full Q/A … : Excessive Dog Licking

Q. Is Folliculitis curable? Vet has me using hydrocortisone cream.
ANSWER : A. Folliculitis is usually a symptom of something underlying, as the inflammation is usually bacterial in origin. Systemic diseases that can lead to bacterial folliculitis include endocrine disorders (such as hypothyroidism and Cushing’s disease in dogs) and disorders of the immune system.

Skin disorders causing bacterial folliculitis in dogs include: canine acne, acral lick granuloma, skin fold pyoderma, interdigital pododermatitis (interdigital cysts), idiopathic furunculosis of German Shepherd Dogs, pyotraumatic folliculitis, and callus dermatitis, among others. In both dogs and cats, allergic skin disease is perhaps the most common cause of bacterial folliculitis. Parasitism and fungal infection of the skin are also common causes.

The diagnosis of bacterial folliculitis is typically made upon visual inspection and often after undertaking one or more of the following diagnostic tests:

Skin scrapings for mites

Skin cytology

Fungal culture

Wood’s lamp examination for fungus (ringworm)

Bacterial culture and sensitivity

Skin biopsy and histopathology

If the medication your vet prescribed does not improve the skin’s condition, make a recheck appointment with your vet for further diagnostics or ask for a referral to a veterinary dermatologist for a more extensive workup.

Q. My dogs skin has become red the vet said its an allergy to fleas yet he has none could it be an allergic reaction to my new carpet.
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My 10 year old male German Shepard Dog is constantly chewing at his legs, hind quarters and underbelly. No fleas or visible rash. Inside dog. Any ide
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.