Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Yes, it certainly can. Wether it is the old problem reoccurring or just some inflammation flaring up, it depends on the condition itself , how it was treated and how it responded to treatment.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

The most common causes of acute or sudden lameness in dogs are soft tissue injury (strain or sprain), injury to a joint, bone fracture, or dislocation. Osteoarthritis and hip dysplasia may also cause lameness in dogs. Lameness can affect dogs of any age from growing puppies to senior dogs.
Treatment of lameness

For minor causes of lameness (sprain) restricting your dog`s exercise, or complete rest for a few days is usually adequate. If the exact cause is not known, a period of exercise reduction together with anti-inflammatories and pain killers may be required to see if the lameness improves.

Most strains settle down within days, and affected dogs are often sound within a week or two. However, it may take a convalescent period to regain full strength.
A limp, or lameness, can be a symptom of trauma or a disease such as arthritis or infection. If you do observe limping, or other signs that mobility is compromised such as difficulty rising up or maneuvering stairs, you should restrict your pet`s movement until your pet can be examined.
If your dog limps on and off, it may be due to joint pain common in older dogs, or it could be your dog`s ability to mask pain. If your dog is limping suddenly, a sprained ankle or impact-related injury may be present.
If your pet is limping but not showing any signs of pain, it is still worth contacting your vet for advice. Because dogs can`t speak, it can sometimes be difficult to spot when they`re in pain, whether it be as a result of injury or an underlying issue.
In cases where pinched nerves cause numbness, it could last anywhere from a few days to multiple weeks. There are several different factors that can affect how long that numbness lasts, including whether you seek help for your symptoms.
Limping in dogs is common but not normal. Lameness or limping means the dog is walking abnormally on one or more limbs. This may be due to pain, loss of function, or both.
In general, gradual onset limps in dogs are caused by an underlying, chronic or degenerative condition, such as osteoarthritis or dysplasia. Sudden onset limps, on the other hand, are usually caused by an injury or trauma. Just because your dog has a gradual limp does not mean you should put off making an appointment.
`Little and often` is the best approach when it comes to exercising arthritic pets. It may suit them better to take them on several short walks each day, rather than one long walk. Keep their exercise pattern as regular as possible – try to avoid short walks during the week and a really long walk at the weekend.
Large dogs may age faster, becoming seniors as early as 6 or 7, while smaller dogs may not start showing signs of age until they are 9 or 10. One of the most common concerns in senior dogs is arthritis, which can cause a dog to move stiffly and slowly and sometimes also gain weight because of decreased activity.
Arthritis gets worse over time, so slight stiffness may eventually turn into limping. Your dog may only limp at certain times, perhaps after first getting up, following extensive periods of exercise, or when the weather is cold.
Superficial injuries can include a cut or scrape caused by a sharp object such as stepping on glass, getting stuck by a thorn, walking on a nail, or running on hot pavement. Other paw injuries that can cause limping include bites or stings, infection, broken toenails, or burns.
When you first notice that your dog is limping, if it isn`t severe try to rest your pup as best you can. That means limiting their mobility to avoid causing further strain on the injury. Exercise should be limited to short on-leash walks for bathroom breaks until your pooch has healed.
This is another question to ask yourself before knowing when to let your dog go. Most often, weakness and inability to move freely are clear signs that the animal needs urgent medical help or has declined to the point that it`s time to consider euthanasia or putting your dog to sleep.
Arthritis. Osteoarthritis, also called degenerative joint disease, is the most common cause of limping after sleeping or rest. It becomes more common with age so that by 12 most dogs experience it.
Dogs can start to show signs of arthritis as early as 1 year of age. According to the Vet Times (pdf), the degenerative joint condition can be found in 20% of dogs before their first year and 80% of more senior dogs at or over age 8.
There is ] no difference between lameness and limping. The terms are used inter-changeably. I`ve seen both terms used on humans, dogs, cats and larger animals. However, for some reason, it seems that I hear the term “lame” or “lameness” more commonly used on horses and larger animals than small animals.
Answer: Since you have not found any swelling or painful areas, it could be a pulled muscle or an injured joint. If you take your dog to an emergency clinic they will probably give him an anti-inflammatory injection.
If the limp doesn`t begin to resolve itself, is becoming worse, or is accompanied with whining or yelping, it`s time to call your vet or visit your nearest emergency vet. Your veterinarian has the training and knowledge to best determine the cause and severity of your pup`s pain.
Recovery of Muscle Tear in Dogs

Be prepared for a minimum recovery time frame of four to six weeks.

One of the best exercises for strengthening your pup`s hind legs is simply standing on a step or other elevated platform. Dogs naturally enjoy basking in the sunshine or looking out the window, so getting them accustomed to standing on a step should be fairly easy.
The key is to overload the affected muscles to strengthen them, but it needs to be done gently, carefully, and gradually. Dog physical therapy is an ideal way to first help with the recovery process and then to continue to strengthen the muscles after healing.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Does an indoor cat need to be vaccinated every year?
ANSWER : A. In practice, I recommend a feline combo vaccine every year, but will generally start administering every 3 years once they have had their kitten vaccines and 2 additional yearly vaccines. Rabies, is required yearly by law, and if kept up to date can be good for up to three years also. Based on the age of your cat I would give a yearly feline combo and rabies, and then boost the combo again next year.

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. Can lameness reoccur one year later?
ANSWER : A. Yes, it certainly can. Wether it is the old problem reoccurring or just some inflammation flaring up, it depends on the condition itself , how it was treated and how it responded to treatment.

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. We have been treating our 5 year old cat for black bumps that we treated with Special Diet. These bumps grow over his body
ANSWER : A. If your cat has black bumps or other skin lesions forming that have not cleared up with preventive flea treatment or changes in diet, it may be time to request some additional testing as needed. Your vet can take a skin scraping of one of the lesions and send it to a Lab for various tests. One test includes growing any bacteria or fungus present, and then subjecting them to various medications to find which one is best to use. Other tests just look for certain growth patterns to determine if a fungus or bacteria is present which can be treated with oral or topical medications from your vet.

Cats can commonly have chin acne, which is the formation of little bumps that can be red or black in color and may sometimes break open and ooze debris. The cause of this acne is unknown, however one theory is that cats can actually get bacterial infections from rubbing their chins on plastic food dishes or dishes that are not cleaned often. Treatment may involve anywhere from none at all in minor cases, to use of wipes, creams or antibiotics for helping clear up any infection.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. My dog may have worms, appears to be white and small, saw what I thought was one the other day in her stool, any suggestions? Cannot afford vet
ANSWER : A. You need to get a good quality worm treatment. The most effective ones are available from the vet. You can try an over the counter one but you may find it isn’t good enough and end out having to pay for the one from your vet. I would recommend just going for the best treatment, it is more cost effective in the end.

Q. My 9 year old lab has tested positive for heart worms. A feed store owner told me I could use Noromectin (ivermectin) to get rid of them? Is it safe?
ANSWER : A. The feed store owner is taking about the “slow kill” method for adult heartworms. This method is the considered an alternate method that has the following disadvantages over the normal immiticide treatment:
1) Takes years (often-times up to 2-4 years) to completely rid heartworms vs immiticide treatment which takes at most 3 months
2) Slowly kills baby worms only in the bloodstream, does not kill adult worms in the heart. Immiticide kills the adult worms that are in the heart directly which is why it is so effective.
3) Higher risk of thromboembolism (clots in the lung artery) than Immiticide treatment.
4) Adult worms will stay in the heart for years and can impede blood flow.
So that is the gist of doing the slow kill method for baby heartworms instead of the fast kill method with Immiticide for adult heartworms. Which is why most veterinarians will recommend the fast kill method as the best choice for your pets care.