Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is unlikely that the skin changes are due to Phenobarbitone. Skin side effects has been described in humane but I don’t think it has been reported in cats. Skin patches could be due to bacterial infection or ringworm so using steroids would be contraindicated. You should take your cat your vets to find out what the scabs are. If these changes are due to allergy then hydrocortizon would be the right drug to go for.

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Is hydrocortisone cream safe for pets? Hydrocortisone cream, when used sparingly, is an option to relieve your pet`s itching. OTC hydrocortisone is a mild corticosteroid that helps reduce swelling, redness, and itchiness. It`s readily available and inexpensive.
Steroid cream – A low-potency steroid cream, such as hydrocortisone, can help relieve itching for your cat when applied regularly to their scabbing skin.
Products intended for humans which contain hydrocortisone are not recommended for dogs or cats.
You can use hydrocortisone cream on dogs to soothe minor irritations like bug bites and small rashes. Vets often recommend it to treat skin allergies, inflammatory skin diseases, infections such as hot spots, and to help decrease ear inflammation in dogs with severe ear infections, says Butzer.
Overall, Neosporin or any first aid ointment is beneficial to the superficial wounds your pet may endure but anything bigger, or certainly something looking infected should be inspected by your veterinarian. Definitely do not use any first aid ointment on suture sites UNLESS directed by your veterinarian.
TOPICAL OINTMENT FOR DOGS & CATS: HomeoPet HP Healing Cream can promote skin-wound healing for dogs, cats, and other pets. This natural wound-care ointment for healing is a safe and natural solution for skin injuries.
Apply Topical Treatments

Treatments like topical steroid creams can help reduce itchiness and prevent scratching or biting at the site. Make sure you keep your cat from licking off the cream. To do this, you may need to buy an “E-collar” for your cat to wear.

Prednisolone or methylprednisolone is given at 1 to 2mg/kg daily in cats until remission of pruritus (usually three to five days), then the dose is reduced to every other day and then further reduced to the lowest dose that will control the pruritus (generally 0.25 to 0.5mg/kg every other day).
Can you use hydrocortisone cream on dogs and cats? Yes. If you`ve got an over-the-counter hydrocortisone cream (1% concentration) in your medicine cabinet, apply a thin layer to the hot spot to help soothe the skin. You can apply it up to twice a day.
“We usually see a reduction of itchiness, redness and inflammation in 1 to 3 days.” If you don`t see any improvement within the first week, that`s usually a sign the cream won`t work for you, adds Milne. Make sure you keep your doctor updated on your symptoms.
Topical antibiotic ointment. Neosporin® is a common topical antibiotic used on minor cuts and scrapes. This ointment is pretty safe in dogs and should be in every first aid kit. Verify that the ointment only contains antibiotic and not steroids, which can actually delay healing.
How is this medication useful? In animals, hydrocortisone can be used to treat hypoadrenocorticism (Addison`s disease), and can be used as an anti-inflammatory drug, immunosuppressive drug, and antineoplastic agent (anticancer). Dosages vary for each of these uses.
Mix together 1 pint water, 1/2-teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon calendula tincture. Soak an injured paw in the solution. If the wound is on the body, put the solution in a squirt bottle or large syringe and gently apply it to the injured area. Repeat the soaking or application every 4 to 6 hours for the first 24 hours.
Place the tip of the applicator through the hair and place directly against the skin or against the wound. Squeeze the applicator until all of the medication has flowed out of the applicator. Try to avoid application of the medication on the hair.
Be gentle as the skin around the wound is often sensitive and easily damaged. A little bit of Vaseline placed into the wound first can help catch any stray hairs and can then be gently removed afterwards.
NEVER ever use household human antiseptics (eg Dettol), disinfectants or wound creams (eg Savlon) on cats as they cause further damage and are often toxic if licked.
Miliary dermatitis has been associated with feline acne, flea eczema, flea allergy dermatitis, and scabby cat disease. The causes of miliary dermatitis in cats can be external and internal. However, they express themselves with more or less the same set of symptoms, scabs being the most obvious of the tell-tale signs.
Typically, you will need to clean the wound two or three times daily with a mild antiseptic solution or warm water to remove any crusted discharge and to keep the wound edges clean.
Flush the wound – For small cuts and abrasions, you can gently clean the wound with a clean wet cloth and iodine or a saline solution. You may first need to move excess hair from the wound area, or even clip the hair if necessary. Try to clear any debris from the wound site as best as you can without rubbing.
You should treat the scratch with an antiseptic ointment. A triple antibiotic ointment such as Neosporin can be used; these ointments contain neomycin, an antibiotic that is very effective in allowing cut injuries to heal. Triple antibiotic ointment can be applied to the wound three times daily.
Good items to have at home in case of wounds include: Sterile, non-stick gauze. Antiseptic solution (povidone-iodine or chlorhexidine diacetate)
Apply spray directly to affected skin areas only. Do not use more than 3 times per day or for longer than 1 week. Prevent cats from licking affected area until spray has dried. If symptoms persist or worsen, discontinue use of this product and consult a veterinarian.
Steroids will dramatically block the allergic reaction in most cases and bring about rapid improvement in the cat`s clinical signs. Steroids may be given orally or by injection, depending on the cat`s condition.
Hydrocortisone can help treat inflammatory skin conditions that cause redness, swelling, and itching. Topical hydrocortisone is not a conventional acne treatment. It has no effect on acne-causing bacteria, so it cannot prevent breakouts. However, it could help improve the appearance of inflammatory acne.

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Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. My cat has a major rash on her back it looks like red bumps an some have even turned into scabs.
ANSWER : A. Skin disorders can be particularly vexing to diagnosis and treat. One of the most common causes of skin rashes in cats is allergic dermititis caused by the bites of fleas. Some cats are very sensitive to the bite(s) of fleas and will react with excessive itching, scratching, and scabby bumps particularly on the lower back and nape of neck. Finding fleas on your cat is a pretty good indicator that fleas are causing the skin irritation. Unfortunately, NOT finding fleas doesn’t rule out an allergy to fleas, as it takes only one bite from a flea to cause a reaction in sensitive cats. Moreover, there are many other possible causes for skin rashes in cats, including thyroid disease, fungal diseases, bacterial or viral infections, and irritation from chemicals in the enviroment (scented litter, fabric sheets, air freshners, floor and carpet cleaners, etc.).
A trip to the veterinarian is your first step in treating skin disorders. Your vet will examine your cat, checking for fleas and other external parasites and also looking at the distribution pattern of the rash which will help your vet to determine what might be causing the rash. If necessary, your vet may take hair or skin samples for analysis. Blood work may also be necessary if your vet suspects thyroid diseases or another metabolic disorder.

Q. My cat will not stop going to the toilet on my carpet, bed, washing pile etc.. Also uses its litter box occasionally? I don’t understand why this is?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.
If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.
The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. Can you use hydracortizon creamon scabby patches that my cat has. She takes phenobarbital for siezures. Could that cause the rash??
ANSWER : A. It is unlikely that the skin changes are due to Phenobarbitone. Skin side effects has been described in humane but I don’t think it has been reported in cats. Skin patches could be due to bacterial infection or ringworm so using steroids would be contraindicated. You should take your cat your vets to find out what the scabs are. If these changes are due to allergy then hydrocortizon would be the right drug to go for.