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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. We can’t advise you to give antibiotics without having seen your dog. The best thing you can do is clean it thoroughly with salty water. Put one teaspoon of salt in a pint of boiled water and leave it to cool down. Do this several times a day. You need to flush all the pus out well and continue to clean for several days. If it gets worse then you do need to see your vet. If you can’t afford veterinary treatment then you should definitely consider insurance, although it won’t help in this instance you own a large pet and the chances are you will need it in the future.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If a rupture occurs, it usually will heal on its own. If a rupture doesn`t heal, the cyst can be removed surgically — or it may be treated medically with antiseptic rinses, antibiotic ointments, and corticosteroid ointments. If a large cyst fills repeatedly, a general anaesthetic and surgical excision may be required.
Penicillin is an antibiotic that treats susceptible bacterial infections in dogs, cats, cattle, horses, and swine.
The daily dose of penicillin is 3,000 units per pound of body weight (1 mL per 100 lbs body weight). Continue daily treatment until recovery is apparent and for at least one day after symptoms disappear, usually in two to three days.
Several times a day, clean the area around the abscess with saline in a syringe to avoid disturbing inflamed and painful skin, or by wiping with a saline-soaked piece of gauze and very gently wiping away from the wound opening.
Apply a Warm Compress

After cleaning the cyst, hold a warm compress on the area for five to ten minutes. The moisture and the warmth help to encourage the substance trapped under the skin to make its way out of the hair follicle. Repeat this process up to three times per day until the cyst drains on its own.

If a cyst has burst or there is an infection under the skin, the doctor may need to lance and drain it. They may also prescribe a course of antibiotics.
Penicillin is generally considered safe for use in dogs, cats, horses, livestock, and many exotic pets. It can cause a disruption of the normal bacterial population within the gut of some species, especially rodents.
Can pets take human antibiotics? Although antibiotics will work to fight bacteria, whether it`s used on a human or animal, it`s important to not give antibiotics prescribed to people, says Dr. Phillips. Some antibiotics work better in some species over others and dosages may be different.
Do not give human amoxicillin to your dog unless it has been prescribed by your vet. Your dog will need specific doses based on their weight and may need a special type of amoxicillin. Only your veterinarian should determine the best antibiotic and dose for your dog.
A sialocele is a condition of the salivary glands or ducts. The condition appears as swollen structures in the neck near the jaw, under the tongue, or by the eye. It is a buildup of saliva that can often resemble a cyst and it is usually treated by surgery in dogs.
A ruptured ovarian cyst isn`t automatically a life-threatening condition,” says Baras. “In the majority of cases, the cyst fluid will dissipate and it`ll heal without any intervention. However, there are some instances in which a ruptured ovarian cyst becomes an emergency.”
Once the pus is drained, antibiotics may not be needed unless the infection has spread into the skin around the wound. The wound will take about 1 to 2 weeks to heal, depending on the size of the abscess.
Infection – the cyst fills with bacteria and pus, and becomes an abscess. If the abscess bursts inside the body, there is a risk of blood poisoning (septicaemia). Peritonitis – if an internal cyst bursts, there is a risk of peritonitis, which is inflammation of the membrane lining the abdominal wall.
Apply a bandage. If the lump begins to drain pus, apply a bandage to keep the draining material from spreading. Change the bandage daily. If a large amount of pus drains from the lump, or the lump becomes more red or painful, you may need to see a doctor.
Apply an antibiotic ointment, such as Bacitracin, with clean hands or a clean cotton swab. Wash your hands after applying the ointment, too. Apply an antibacterial spot treatment moving forward, such as tea tree oil. This will help to fight bacteria while ideally reducing inflammation.
In dogs and cats, the typical dose of penicillin G ranges from 10,000 to 25,000 units per pound (20,000 to 50,000 units/kg) two to six times a day. The duration of administration depends on the condition being treated, response to the medication and the development of any adverse effects.
The correct dose is 5 milligrams per pound of body weight twice daily. So if your dog weighs 10 pounds, the dose would be 10 pounds x 5 mg/lb = 50 mg twice daily. The dose may be increased to 10 mg/lb twice daily in severe infections.
Other than a few topical over-the-counter (OTC) antibiotic ointments, there is no other legal way to obtain oral antibiotics. A primary care provider must prescribe your antibiotics for several reasons.
How can you prepare? Beginning on June 11, 2023, over-the-counter antibiotics will no longer be available through traditional retail channels. Instead, these antibiotics will require a prescription from a veterinarian licensed in the state where the animals are housed.
Chloramphenicol—Chloramphenicol is an antibiotic that has a level of pH that can be safe enough for it to completely pass through your dog`s body. This makes it a top choice for treating a dog with bacterial infections in the organs.
Human Amoxicillin Not the Same as Pet Amoxicillin

Some of these ingredients, says Mahaney, include artificial flavors, colors, and chemical preservatives. Pet owners also need to be on the lookout for xylitol in medications, Mahaney says. Xylitol is a sugar substitute that can be toxic to dogs.

Staphylococcal Infection (staph infection)

This type of infection may impact a dog`s skin or upper respiratory tract, and can be treated using oral antibiotics such as cephalexin, erythromycin or clindamycin. Antibiotic ointments and shampoos can also work.

Most commonly it is used to treat skin, respiratory, and urinary tract infections. Its use in cats and dogs to treat certain bacterial infections and at certain doses, as well as use in ferrets, birds, and reptiles is `off label` or `extra label`.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Cant afford vet and my ridgeback has a popped cyst on her neck. Its filled with cheese like pus. How much penicillin tablet do I give her in mgs?help
ANSWER : A. We can’t advise you to give antibiotics without having seen your dog. The best thing you can do is clean it thoroughly with salty water. Put one teaspoon of salt in a pint of boiled water and leave it to cool down. Do this several times a day. You need to flush all the pus out well and continue to clean for several days. If it gets worse then you do need to see your vet. If you can’t afford veterinary treatment then you should definitely consider insurance, although it won’t help in this instance you own a large pet and the chances are you will need it in the future.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. My dog cracked his nail horizontally, I put neosporine on it with gauze and a sock for no snagging. What should I do and what would a vet cost?
ANSWER : A. It depends on how deep it’s cut and if it’s going to snag on something and rip the entire nail off. It would probably be best to go to the vet now rather than later when a more serious injury occurs. The cost really depends on where you live and what the vet decides to do. I really can’t give much of an estimate other than the initial cost of a sick exam (which also varies from vet to vet). Call the vet and when you make the appointment ask how much a sick exam costs, that will be your initial payment (Amount just to see the vet).

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. MY Shih Tzu IS 14 YEARS OLD. SHE WILL NOT LIFT HER HEAD UP EVEN WHEN YOU ASK HER IF SHE WANTS A TREAT. NORMALLY WHEN YOU SAY TREAT SHE COMES RUNNING .
ANSWER : A. From what you’re describing I think 2 things are likely. Either your dog has pain in her neck, which is causing her to not want to move her head, or she’s feeling generalized weakness.

Neck pain in small dogs is usually due to disk problems. They get a form of disk disease known as Hansen’s type II chronic disease, where the disk gradually moves upward and presses slowly on the spinal cord, causing pain and weakness.

Generalized weakness can be due to a number of conditions, starting with just not feeling well due to a GI problem (nausea, for example) to something like anemia (low red blood cell count) or heart disease. It sounds very much like your girl isn’t feeling well, and likely need some diagnostics in order to figure out what’s going on. You vet will start with a physical examination and rule out possible neck pain, and then will likely recommend blood work or other tests. If you want to talk to us further we can probably provide more information on a consult, where we can get more details about exactly what’s going on.

Q. Which flea and tick drops are the best and why?
ANSWER : A. Your question is a good one, and unfortunately the answers are going to differ based on who you ask. Many vets are seeing resistance to Frontline, which has been the go-to product for many of us for many years. It contains the active ingredient Fipronil, which is very safe and typically extremely effective. I use it on my dogs and never see fleas or ticks. However other vets will tell you in their areas, for whatever reason, they are seeing fleas and ticks on dogs and cats on which this product was used.

Another reason opinions differ is that some people like to give an oral product, and some like to put a topical product directly on the skin. That’s a matter of personal preference mostly. Bravecto, as mentioned below, is one of those products. Most people find it safe and effective. It uses a different process that Frontline to kill fleas and ticks.

In general the products you buy over-the-counter are likely going to be less expensive and less effective than what you get from a vet. I think the reason is that the more expensive products contain newer insecticides, and likely less resistance to these products has built up in the flea and tick population but also they are maybe less “proven”, so it’s important for a vet to be involved in the use of the product in order to ensure that there won’t be a negative reaction to using it.

If I lived in an area where there was Lyme disease (in the US that’s the northeast and upper midwest) I’d most definitely add a tick collar to my standard oral or topical flea and tick prevention. AND I’d search both of my dogs everyday for ticks. It’s because nothing you buy will be 100% effective, and Lyme disease can be a very serious problem.

If you want to talk further and talk more specifically about where you live and what products you’re considering, I’d be happy to do a consult with you. Nobody here is paid to recommend products, but we do develop preferences based on what we use on our own pets and in our practices.

Q. My cat has a cyst close to his eye. Is there any way to treat this sebaceous cyst?
ANSWER : A. If the cyst is causing problems with sight or having your cat open his eye, it is best to have examined by a vet. Cysts can be drained to help the swelling go down, however cysts can return after drainage. In some cases of returning cysts, surgical removal may be needed to permanently keep the cyst from returning. Keeping the eye clean and free of debris will also help prevent any infection from forming if the cyst allows dirt or debris to stay close to the eye.

Q. My dog was stung by a wasp inside his ear. He has been holding that side of his head down and shakes his head a lot. What can I give him for pain?
ANSWER : A. You can give some benedryl tablets 25mg tablets and dose at 1 mg per pound, (e.g. 25 pounds=25 miligrams= 1 tablet if the tablets are 25mg) to help with the allergic part of it. Pain wise there is nothing you can give OTC to help. He needs to see a vet for pain meds. Make sure you locate and remove the stinger also.

Q. My indoor cat shakes his head a lot and it’s been going on for a while. Vet did not see anything like mites, but the shaking isn’t stoping. Help?
ANSWER : A. Call your vet back and explain your concerns. Sometimes itching at the ears could also be a food allergy. Ask your vet if they think it could be a food allergy and what they would recommend. Your cat more than likely eats a mainly corn and/or chicken diet. Higher quality foods are grain-free which could also help. Maybe try switching to a food with the main ingredient of duck. When your pet has a food allergy you must not give them anything but their specific food (Such as duck only canned and kibble diet). If you’d like to investigate it further with your vet you can ask to do an allergy test to see what your cat is specifically allergic to.