ill there.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Cats can have long breaks between kittens even 24 h lasting. But in these breakes cat should behave normal, she can also eat, drink, take care of babies. If your cat is restless, pants and has cramps without expulsion of kitten for longer than 30 min you should contact a vet as an emergency.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

A very common cause is postpartum low blood calcium, otherwise known as milk fever. Signs of this include rapid breathing, amongst many others, and while it is rare for felines, they are at higher risk for it during their first litter.
Blood tests will be done to determine if your cat has an infection that has spread to the bloodstream. An ultrasound may be administered in an attempt to locate a possible retained placenta. X-rays may be ordered in addition to or instead of an ultrasound to locate the retained placenta.
What is Retained Placenta? A retained placenta is a very serious and life-threatening condition for a cat as a retained and unremoved placenta will begin to decompose within the cat`s uterus, causing a dangerous bacterial infection that will likely spread to the cat`s bloodstream and throughout the body.
After delivery of a kitten, the queen may enter stage III labor. This is the time when the placenta, or afterbirth, is delivered and usually occurs 5-15 minutes after delivery of the kitten. If multiple kittens are born rapidly, several placentas may be expelled together.
Pregnant or laboring

Though panting is not as common for cats as it is for dogs, there are times when heavy breathing in cats is normal—like when they are pregnant, especially laboring. If your pregnant cat is panting and acting strange, there might be some kittens on the way!

The main sign will be a foul-smelling vaginal discharge after the birth of the kittens. You may notice she has a fever, is lethargic, and milk production slows or stops. You must take her to the vet straight away as she will need to be admitted to the veterinary hospital.
Initially, a queen may attempt to revive a stillborn kitten by rigorously licking and cuddling them. If the queen is unable to revive the stillborn kitten, she will abandon the kitten to take care of the rest of the litter. Sometimes, a queen will eat her stillborn young.
After giving birth

She will need to stay with her kittens to feed and bond with them. Make sure they are in a quiet space, free from noise and disturbance. There is a risk that your cat may reject her kittens if she doesn`t feel comfortable, relaxed and able to bond with them after giving birth.

She`s Being Extremely Vocal

If your cat is making a variety of vocalizations, like loud meows, she most likely still has kittens inside her. The only time you need to worry about your cat vocalizing during the birthing process is if it continues long after the last kitten was born.

Count the number of placentas your cat passes – there should be one placenta for every kitten. If you notice there are less placentas than there are kittens, mum could have eaten them, or twins may have shared one.
Generally, no, you do not need to cut the umbilical cords of kittens because the mother will sever them herself. She will usually also consume some or all of the placentas, which is very nutritious. Giving birth is hard work, and the mother will become hungry, so eating the placentas (and umbilical cords) is natural.
Adult cats and kittens breathe faster than humans, so what seems rapid may be normal. If they are breathing more than 30 times per minute while they sleep, though, it may indicate an underlying problem. Contact your vet if your cat is breathing faster than normal.
Nursing mother cats need to eat a high quality kitten formula food. If she is a picky eater, do not hesitate to try feeding her canned tuna, chicken or salmon.
As long as the kittens are nursing frequently and appear to be thriving, they will be OK. Keep the mother cat and her babies in a quiet part of the house; a separate room is ideal.
New mothers are usually very nervous about their babies. For this reason, many will not leave their side for at least the first 24 hours. The cat will do without food or water and some won`t even leave to visit the litter box. For this reason, it is important that the new mother has food and water kept close by.
The queen often becomes restless and experiences discomfort in her belly area and won`t want to nurse, lay with, or take care of her kittens. She may eat very little or refuse food and water, and a brownish vaginal discharge may be evident. If you notice these signs, your cat requires immediate veterinary care.
In cats the average length of full parturition (delivery) is 16 hours, with a range of 4–42 hours (up to three days in some cases may be normal). It is important to consider this variability before intervening.
When a cat loses a companion, whether animal or human, she most certainly grieves and reacts to the changes in her life. Cats alter their behavior when they mourn much like people do: They may become depressed and listless. They may have a decreased appetite and decline to play.
The mother will be extremely protective. Kittens that young are vulnerable to infection and disease and you may harm them by picking them up too soon. Once they reach two weeks of age, it is a good idea to introduce them to humans and touch (weeks two to seven are a good time for socialisation).
Cats need time to adjust and settle if you move house. They could get into serious danger trying to return to their previous home. To prevent this, keep cats indoors for at least two weeks after moving. Ensure your cat`s behaviour has settled before letting them outside.
Some rather dependent cats will deliberately delay or interrupt labour if the owner has to go out. This resting stage may last up to 24 or even 36 hours, after which straining recommences and the remainder of the litter is born quite normally and easily.
Your cat may have one or more dead kittens still inside. PLEASE GET HER TO A VET IMMEDIATELY! If this is the case, they need to be removed as soon as possible or she may die from sepsis as they decompose in her uterus. And please have her spayed while you`re there.
Unfortunately, orphaned kittens less than 4 weeks old cannot live without their mother, and must be bottle fed around the clock in order to survive. Thankfully, most discoveries of newborn kittens do not call for human assistance, and in fact, leaving Mom and her family alone is generally the best thing you can do.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Cat gave birth to 5 babies last one was 4hrs ago she’s still heavy breathing no temp not sure if the last placenta came out, feels like 1 still there.
ANSWER : A. Cats can have long breaks between kittens even 24 h lasting. But in these breakes cat should behave normal, she can also eat, drink, take care of babies. If your cat is restless, pants and has cramps without expulsion of kitten for longer than 30 min you should contact a vet as an emergency.

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. Aggressive young cat attacking my other cat?
ANSWER : A. Aggression among cats can be a sign of stress, especially if one cat has just been introduced, or if the other cat is overly curious/friendly toward the scared one. The best first step is to make sure each cat has their own separate “spaces” where they can go to get away from harassment from the other cat. Up-high bedding, quiet rooms, etc can all help. Make sure each cat also has their own litter box and food/water bowls as cats often do not like to share and this can be a point of aggression between them. Lastly, placing pheromone diffusers or pheromone calming collars on one or both cats may help decrease stress and aggression through the use of cat calming pheromones. Fel-i-way is one of the most common brands.

Q. My cat is still purring but he’s coughing and what sounds like hiccups, he isn’t drinking, not sure if I need rush to vet or be ok he’s still himself?
ANSWER : A. Erring on the side of safety, any time there is change in how a kitty is breathing, it is best to get them into a vet clinic.

Coughing can be caused by innocuous things like allergies, but in a cat his age, there are concerns for things like feline asthma, pneumonia, or a condition like congestive heart failure.

Cats not only purr when they are feeling content, but they also can purr when they are frightened or feeling pain or illness. Combined with the fact that he’s not drinking, it sounds like your boy is feeling pretty icky. Cats are masters at hiding illness to keep themselves from being hunted by larger predators, so when it becomes noticeable to you, it means he’s ill enough that he’s no longer able to keep it hidden.

Your vet should be able to check him out and narrow down what’s going on and treat it as necessary. Good luck, and I hope he gets to feeling better soon!

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.