Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. This symptom can be connected with some pain in the abdominal cavity or spine injury. See your vet to check if everything is ok

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Common signs of feline IBD include vomiting, weight loss, diarrhea, bloody stools, lethargy, and decreased appetite. These signs can vary in severity and frequency, and the predominant signs depend on which parts of the GI tract are affected.
The most common symptoms of IBS in cats include: Diarrhea, which might be accompanied by mucus. Dyschezia (painful pooping) Abdominal bloating/gas.
The two drugs that most commonly recommended and effective drugs for cats in this setting are cyclosporine and chlorambucil. Antibiotic therapy with metronidazole (5-10 mg/kg po q12h) has been effectively used for a number of years and continues to be recommended for initial therapy of IBD.
For many cats with inflammatory bowel disease, the prognosis is good. Although there is no cure for IBD in cats, symptoms can often be managed, allowing your cat to live comfortably for many years.
Associated clinical signs can include change in appetite (anorexia, inappetence, or ravenousness), weight loss, and lethargy. In some cats, the clinical signs are cyclic; they seem to flare up and then abate in a predictable pattern.
Is IBD in Cats Painful? IBD can cause pain, such as abdominal cramping from diarrhea. However, a cat with IBD is more likely to experience discomfort rather than severe pain.
Moisture-rich—Staying hydrated is vital for your cat`s digestive health. Wet cat food can contain up to 78% moisture, and the high water intake will help maintain normal bowel movements. Low-carb—Food for cats with IBS shouldn`t have a high percentage of carbs.
Contents. Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is a common condition that affects the digestive system. It causes symptoms like stomach cramps, bloating, diarrhoea and constipation. These tend to come and go over time, and can last for days, weeks or months at a time.
Signs of IBD in companion animals include diarrhea, weight loss, vomiting, lethargy and/or changes in appetite. IBD in cats often manifests as increased appetite and large amounts of diarrhea. However, a cat might also experience a decreased appetite in which weight loss is common.
They tend to drink a lot and urinate a lot. Despite that, their kidneys are also having a hard time filtering toxins and can benefit from help flushing them out. IBD kitties are prone to diarrhea and/or vomiting which can also lead to dehydration.
For many cat`s with inflammatory bowel disease the prognosis is good. Although there is no cure for IBD in cats, symptoms can often be managed, allowing your cat to live comfortably for many years.
Unfortunately, there is no cure for inflammatory bowel disease in cats, but symptoms can often be controlled in order to keep your cat comfortable and healthy. Even with proper management, this disease`s symptoms may flare up every so often.
Most likely, these medications are associated with a small, but measurable, increased risk of lymphoma. The majority of evidence supports the fact that IBD itself does not increase the risk of lymphoma.
SYMPTOMS OF IBS OR IBD IN CATS AND DOGS

One general difference is that pets with IBD often lose weight and may feel the urge to go to the bathroom more often than normal but produce less stool each time. Some of the main causes of IBS in cats and dogs are: Food Sensitivity. Stress.

Probiotics work to enhance the right balance of GI bacteria. I have learned through my two cats with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), that probiotics given daily in their food really helps to strengthen and build their intestinal tract and reduce the symptoms and suffering caused by IBD.
Many veterinarians recommend a bland meal of chicken and rice for cats struggling with digestion issues. It`s not a complete dietary solution but a temporary fix to strengthen them and stabilise their irritated tummies.
Often IBD cats develop an intolerance for common meats they eat regularly, like chicken. They may do better with less common ones like duck and venison. Feline Pride offers some helpful options there because they have a variety of meats to choose from.
If you have IBS with diarrhea, you will have frequent, loose, watery stools. You may have an urgent need to have a bowel movement, which may be hard to control. If you have IBS with constipation, you will have a hard time passing stool, as well as fewer bowel movements.
With IBS-D, your stool might be loose, though not always. You also might have sudden urges to use the bathroom. People with IBS-D may experience dehydration from frequent bouts of diarrhea and may need to drink extra fluids and electrolytes to keep their bodies hydrated.
Three meals a day is the minimum ideal. For IBD cats, as many small meals a day as you can manage is even better. Meals do not need to be evenly spaced. Most find that before work, after work, and before bed works just fine, though young kittens do need to be fed more frequently.
Moisture: Feeding your cat a diet that`s high in moisture is a good way to combat issues like dehydration which can occur in cats suffering from IBD. You might find that opting for the best wet cat food is a better solution than relying entirely on dry kibble.
Ingredients to avoid include chicken, beef, fish, corn, wheat, soy, and dairy products. (Of course, if your cat has been eating a food containing lamb, rice, eggs, or any other proteins, those ingredients must be avoided as well.) How is IBD treated?
Inflammatory Bowel Disease – usually causes diarrhoea, but can also cause constipation. Disruption to the nerves that supply the gut (in diseases such as Key Gaskell Syndrome/Feline Dysautonomia).
Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) or intestinal neoplasia can cause the small intestines to not properly absorb nutrients from the food your cat ingests. This leads to weight loss, muscle wasting, and often, increased appetite.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. Cat was vomiting for a few days. Took to vet, received anti-nausea medicine 2 days ago. Drinks and no longer vomits, but won’t eat. I’m worried
ANSWER : A. If your cat has been feeling nauseated, it is possible that the nausea, or just general illness is making him want to eat less. However, you can try enticing him to eat with a few tricks geared to cats.

Warming up wet foods or even bland people foods such as plain chicken or boiled hamburger can make food more interesting to cats. Cats tend to go for aromatic rather than flavorful foods, so making the food as “smelly” as possible may encourage your cat to take a bite. Bland foods are also good for helping to soothe upset stomachs, which may still be happening if your cat had recently had a vomiting episode.

However, if enticing your cat to eat does not work, or he continues to refuse to eat any food, it is best to contact your local veterinarian for more care and testing. Cats can become very ill if they refuse to eat for more than a few days, and finding the underlying cause can help your cat feel better.

Q. My cat can only eat strained baby food consistency food. What do I add to strained meat to give her what she needs? She is a torti Persian 5 lbs
ANSWER : A. You should be offering her some wet cat food. Any brand is okay, but you could find a high quality food if you look hard. Cats prefer getting their water from their food, so it’s important to use wet food for a cat instead of just dry food. It’s okay to feed her white meat chicken, and things like that if you want, but you should definitely be feeding some sort of CAT FOOD.. and I bet wet food would be appealing to her considering it’s very moist, like baby food. You can even mash it up further, and look for a food that is really liquidy.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. Why should I buy cat food according to my cat’s life stage?
ANSWER : A. The nutritional needs for your cat vary depending on their life stage. Kittens should follow a diet that is higher in protein and calories to meet their growth requirements (without consuming excess). For adult cats, it’s important to remember that an “all life stage” cat food may seem like a good idea, but may have an adverse effect for some adult and senior cats due to excess nutrients. If you’re tempted to feed your kitten an “all life stage” food this may result in health concerns as well. “All life stage” cat food must meet or exceed requirements needed for growth and when fed to a kitten the food may have a harmful effect on their health and weight. As always, it’s best to consult a veterinarian so he or she can help you make an educated decision about what type of food is best for your cat’s individual needs.

Q. Cat has ibs and is on id food, is currently walking with steeply humped back and all four feet close together no sickness or diarrhe
ANSWER : A. This symptom can be connected with some pain in the abdominal cavity or spine injury. See your vet to check if everything is ok