Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. There are several possibilities like gastrointestinal upset from abrubt dietary change, infection, inotoxication, worms infestation or more serious diseases of liver, kidneys, pancreas.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Causes of diarrhoea and vomiting in cats

worms or gut parasites, especially in kittens. eating something that upsets their stomach. some hormonal conditions such as hyperthyroidism. gastroenteritis (inflammation of the stomach/intestines)

Gastroenteritis in cats is easy to spot. In gastroenteritis, your cat`s vomit may include foamy, and yellow bile, especially if their stomach is empty. Take note of any dry heaving or gagging. Your cat could have large amounts of runny bowel movements several times a day.
Though most cases of cat diarrhea resolve in a matter of hours or days without intervention, cats who have it for more than a few days, or that show more severe signs (such as vomiting, appetite loss, bloody stools, watery stools or tiredness), should be seen by a veterinarian immediately.
If your cat`s diarrhea or vomiting last longer than twelve hours, or if they are nearly uncontrollable, go to the emergency vet. Diarrhea and vomiting that last this long can quickly lead to severe, even fatal, levels of dehydration.
Your vet may prescribe anti-nausea medication, which can be administered orally or via injection. Additional medications, such as antacids, antibiotics, dewormers, probiotics, prokinetics or pain medication may be prescribed, depending on your cat`s needs.
Because there are so many causes of diarrhea, the treatment will vary. In many cases of simple diarrhea in adult cats, it is recommended to withhold food for 12-24 hours, and provide small amounts of water frequently. Then, a bland diet such as boiled (fat-free) chicken and rice is offered in small amounts.
Yellow or Green Cat Poop: Cat poop that is yellow or green sometimes indicates that the cat is passing stool too quickly and may have a digestive problem. This could be the result of intestinal parasites, bacterial infection, or issues with the liver or gallbladder.
Brown Bile: Sometimes brown liquid vomit can be bile from your cat`s liver. Vomited bile is usually yellow in color, though, so if it is determined that the brown liquid your cat is vomiting is bile, that could be a sign of a problem with your cat`s internal organs.
When to contact your vet. If your cat has had mild diarrhoea for less than 24 hours, but is otherwise fine (bright, active and has no other symptoms), you may want to try settling them at home before contacting your vet (see advice below).
When to Call the Vet. If your cat has diarrhea for two days or more, call your veterinarian. Cat diarrhea is an emergency if the feces are black or bloody, or accompanied by other signs of illness—like fever, vomiting, lethargy or sluggishness, or lack of appetite.
If frequent liquid or semi-liquid stools persist for more than two days, you should consult your veterinarian. If you have more than one cat, you will need to determine which one has diarrhea or if it is occurring in multiple cats.
Symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pets

Some signs of illness in pets may include fever, coughing, difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, lethargy, sneezing, nose or eye discharge, vomiting, or diarrhea.

Obstructions can lead to various complications, including the prevention of food and water from passing through your pet`s GI tract, decreasing their blood flow. Bowel obstructions in pets can also be fatal within 3-7 days.
You may see whole worms, parts of worms or worm eggs in your pet`s stool or vomit. Worms or eggs can also sometimes migrate to a cat`s anus, getting stuck in the fur. Change in coat: If your cat is infested with a parasite, their fur may appear dull, rumpled or clumped due to lack of nutrients or dehydration.
Your veterinarian will take a stool sample to test for the presence of microscopic eggs laid by adult worms. The veterinarian will then mix the sample with a solution that makes the eggs more visible underneath the microscope.
Another tip is to add wet food to their diet to ensure they remain hydrated. Additionally, coconut oil has been found to be an effective way to soothe an upset tummy. Lastly, try out some steam therapy by placing your cat in a warm and humid bathroom for about 15 minutes.
Pay Attention to Frequency and Duration

Call the vet if it happens over a long period of time, extending into hours of vomiting. Your pet might have a bacterial infection, virus, intestinal blockage, or disease that needs a vet`s diagnosis. They could also become severely dehydrated if they can`t keep water down.

How long a cat upset stomach lasts depends on the cause. In some cases, they will resolve within 24 hours.
The condition may be of brief duration, readily treatable, and ultimately harmless. An abrupt change in diet, for example, may cause a cat to experience diarrhea for a few days. Likewise, a stressful situation—a long automobile trip or a weekend stay at a veterinary clinic—may produce a brief episode of loose bowels.
Rice is safe for feline consumption as an occasional treat, as long as it is adequately cooked and served in moderate amounts. Due to its high fiber content, rice has been known to help with diarrhea and stomach issues in cats.
The probiotics in yogurt can help your cat with digestion, just like it does with humans. The probiotics can sometimes help relieve symptoms like gas, stomach cramps and diarrhea. Keep in mind that although yogurt can be beneficial, it`s not the most efficient way to add probiotics into your cat`s diet.
When a cat drinks too much water too fast, the stomach becomes filled up with water, will be stretched and enlarged causing the cat to throw up water. Conditions that can cause increased thirst and consequently increased water consumption include kidney disease, hyperthyroidism and diabetes mellitus.
Giardia is a single-celled organism classified as a protozoan. It can live in the intestines of cats (and other animals, including dogs and humans) and cause severe gastrointestinal disease. It is spread by fecal-contaminated water, food, or soil. Giardia is found worldwide and in every part of the United States.
Does yellow diarrhea mean I have an infection? It can sometimes mean an infection—there are bacteria and viruses that can cause diarrhea. If this is the case, you`ll need to be treated with antibiotics to get better.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My new cat seems to constantly have loose stools. I have tried to limit what he eats but with 2 other cats it’s difficult. He also ate a plant I had
ANSWER : A. Many plants can be poisonous to cats, so if you know the type of plant eaten it is best to look up if it is safe for your cat to do so. If you suspect the plant is toxic, it is best to contact your local vet for care.

Loose stools in cats can be caused by a number of things ranging from chronic stress, internal parasites, food allergies, to digestive upset and internal illness. You can try some home remedies such as adding pureed pumpkin or plain yogurt to meals which may help bulk up the stool some and is safe for your other healthy cats to ingest.

However if the loose stools continue, bringing in your cat as well as a sample of his stool to your vet is best. They can check for any internal parasites which may be causing the issue, as well as look for any underlying conditions causing it. If a food allergy is the cause, changing the food should be fine for your other cats if they are healthy.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. My cat has a major rash on her back it looks like red bumps an some have even turned into scabs.
ANSWER : A. Skin disorders can be particularly vexing to diagnosis and treat. One of the most common causes of skin rashes in cats is allergic dermititis caused by the bites of fleas. Some cats are very sensitive to the bite(s) of fleas and will react with excessive itching, scratching, and scabby bumps particularly on the lower back and nape of neck. Finding fleas on your cat is a pretty good indicator that fleas are causing the skin irritation. Unfortunately, NOT finding fleas doesn’t rule out an allergy to fleas, as it takes only one bite from a flea to cause a reaction in sensitive cats. Moreover, there are many other possible causes for skin rashes in cats, including thyroid disease, fungal diseases, bacterial or viral infections, and irritation from chemicals in the enviroment (scented litter, fabric sheets, air freshners, floor and carpet cleaners, etc.).
A trip to the veterinarian is your first step in treating skin disorders. Your vet will examine your cat, checking for fleas and other external parasites and also looking at the distribution pattern of the rash which will help your vet to determine what might be causing the rash. If necessary, your vet may take hair or skin samples for analysis. Blood work may also be necessary if your vet suspects thyroid diseases or another metabolic disorder.

Q. Cat is deficating on rugs, not litter box. Has never done this until this year. We drove from NY to FL, could there be a connection?
ANSWER : A. Sudden changes in bowel or litter box behavior can be caused by both behavioral or medical reasons. Scheduling a wellness exam with your local vet to rule out any problems (and also to bring in a stool sample) is the best first step. Problems such as digestive upset, constipation, diarrhea or even arthritis in older cats making it harder to get into the box can all cause this problem.

If your cat checks out healthy, it is possible that stress such as another person or pet in the home, age, or environment are causing the problem. Make sure that the litter used is the same, and if it needs to be changed that it is done gradually- cats are very picky about what they like as litter. Making sure bedding, food and water are not too close to the litter can also help as cats do not like to potty near these objects usually. For arthritic cats, a step or lowered box can make getting in and out easier to allow for proper use of the box. Keeping the box clean is also a must for cats.

As for cleaning up accidents, using a product such as an enzymatic cleaner may be helpful. These products break down urine and stool particles left in the accident area, and may deter your cat from using the spot as a bathroom again.

Q. My cat has a runny nose along with runny eyes. Should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Runny noses and eyes are common disorders in cats, and are usually a sign of an underlying condition. The most common one being an Upper Respiratory Infection.

This condition, also known as “cat flu”, is seen most often in kittens. It is caused by one of several viruses or bacteria and common symptoms include a runny nose, runny eyes, sneezing, wheezing and congestion.

In some cases, the discharge may change color to greenish or yellow, indicating a secondary infection. Cats that are in high stress environments or in contact with other cats are most likely to get URIs.

At home, be sure to keep your cat eating and drinking to prevent dehydration. You can also use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes or nose that is making seeing or breathing difficult.

Finally, keep in mind that if the symptoms continue for more than a day or two, the discharge becomes green or yellow, or your cat appears to be feverish or in distress, veterinary care should be sought without further delay.

Q. My cat seems to have lost control of her bowels and no longer uses her litter box even to urinate. She is 5 or 6 yrs and is in good health otherwise
ANSWER : A. If your cat has had a sudden change in litter box habits, it is always a good idea to rule out any underlying issues with a wellness check from your vet. Bringing in a urine and stool sample if possible can also help as tests can be run on these samples to check for common infections or parasites. If these are present, treating them usually helps resolve the problem of not using the box.

Loss of bowel control usually results in dribbling of feces or urine rather than complete accidents. If you are seeing this, it is possible that an injury to the hind end or problem with the nerves or muscles is happening and should be looked at by your vet.

If the accidents are complete (full amount of stool, big puddle of urine) your cat may be choosing not to use the litter box due to illness, a too-dirty litter, litter pans that are too tall (which may make older cats have a harder time getting in and out), or a litter substrate that was changed too suddenly. Sometimes, changing the environment your cat’s litter box is in by lowering the sides, moving food and water dishes away and returning back to a previously liked litter can help.

In any area of an accident, an enzymatic cleaner should be used. These break down urine and stool particles, making it so that your cat is less likely to be attracted to going there again. Moving stools to the litter box can also entice your cat to start going there again.