Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You can bandage the wound and then take your dog to your vet tomorrow morning. This is obviously very painful as well. You may want to consider euthanasia, if your dog’s quality of life is not good any more.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

The final stages of osteosarcoma can cause significant illness in dogs when the lungs are affected by metastasis, causing respiratory distress and pain. Euthanasia is often the most humane option when dogs are having more bad days than good.
Cancer in the leg is very painful because small fractures and bleeding cause pressure on the sensitive nerve endings in the surface of the affected bone. Occasionally the fractures can be more severe, causing an actual break in the leg, which cannot heal (called a pathological fracture).
Following diagnosis of osteosarcoma in dogs, life expectancy can be summarised as follows: Without therapy average survival time is approximately two months. This is primarily determined by the discomfort associated with the primary tumour.
The symptoms of osteosarcoma, or bone cancer, in dogs can be subtle. They may include: Lameness that doesn`t go away and swelling of the affected bone; these are the most common symptoms when a tumor affects a limb. Swelling or a mass; this is often the first sign of a tumor in the skull, jaw, or ribs.
Sometimes it is obvious that it is the right time for euthanasia: the pet`s pain may become unmanageable, or the pet might stop eating. Sometimes it is not so obvious: the owner, so tuned in to their pet`s behavior, might simply realize that its quality of life has become unacceptable.
If your dog`s activity is limited due to bone cancer, make sure you spend a good amount of time by their side, comforting and cuddling them. Your dog can`t chase you to be close to their favorite person so you need to go to them. Cuddle often and for long periods of time.
Without treatment, life expectancy for dogs with osteosarcoma of the leg is usually less than 4 months. With aggressive therapy, dogs have a 50% chance of living 1 year or longer.
Osteosarcoma is unfortunately a fast-spreading tumor. By the time the tumor is found in the limb, it is considered to have already spread.
It is important to understand that if an amputation is performed for osteosarcoma without chemotherapy, most patients develop metastatic disease and succumb to the cancer within 4-6 months, which is why we don`t always recommend amputation as a sole therapy.
Foods of interest in dogs with cancer include high quality protein such as dairy products made from goat or sheep, egg, low-mercury fish, organ and muscle meat preferable natural raised. Healthy, low glycemic (GI) carbohydrates such as sweet potato, broccoli, quinoa and gluten free oats.
Osteosarcoma in dogs is a treatable, but generally not curable disease.
Unfortunately, bone cancer is extremely aggressive and often proves fatal even when treated with surgery and other therapies, but your primary and specialty vet teams will collaborate to ensure your dog`s comfort and quality of life for as long as possible.
If your pet has OSA of the skull bones, the tumour may cause changes in their facial appearance and symmetry, or grow into the brain cavity possibly causing seizures. Spinal OSA may compress the spinal cord or nerves and may cause your dog to have difficulty in walking, partially or even completely.
Other symptoms include fever, reduced appetite, and weight loss. It is important for dog owners to be aware of these symptoms, as osteosarcoma is often diagnosed late.
Osteosarcoma is most often diagnosed in dogs between the ages of 6 and 8 years old. However, veterinarians have diagnosed dogs as young as six months with osteosarcoma.
Although osteosarcoma might weaken the bone it develops in, fractures (breaks) are not common. Exceptions are rare telangiectatic osteosarcomas, which tend to weaken bones more than other forms of osteosarcoma and are more likely to cause breaks where the tumor is.
The most common way to evaluate for metastasis involves taking three-view chest X-rays to look at the lungs. If the vet sees nodules in the lungs, this means the osteosarcoma has metastasized.
An osteosarcoma tumor may cause a dull aching pain in the bone or joint around the tumor. Often, there is a firm swelling or lump in the area of the pain. This swelling is caused by the tumor growing inside the bone. If the cancer is in a leg bone, the person may limp.
If osteosarcoma is diagnosed and treated before it has spread outside the area where it started, the 5-year relative survival rate for people of all ages is 76%.
Metastatic osteosarcoma

Most often it spreads to the lungs, but it can also spread to other bones, the brain, or other organs. About 1 out of 5 osteosarcomas have spread already when they are first diagnosed. These cancers are harder to treat, but some can be cured if the metastases can be removed by surgery.

Mast cell tumors are quite serious when identified in dogs. If untreated they can cause anaphylactic shock or if they progress into a more aggressive form they can metastasize and ultimately lead to death.
What is the prognosis for stage 4 bone cancer? Advanced osteosarcomas don`t have the best 5-year survival rate, but its also not the worst. At 27%, it is definitely a frightening diagnosis. As with other aggressive cancers, early diagnosis is key, with local disease having a 77% five-year survival rate.
Metastasis to the lung is the most common site in patients with osteosarcoma. Many studies have confirmed the negative influence of lung metastasis on the survival of osteosarcoma patients.
Palliative management aims to control pain and lameness associated with the primary tumor but does not attempt to modify disease progression or improve survival time. Palliative options include analgesia, radiation therapy, limb amputation, and metronomic chemotherapy.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My chocolate lab keeps biting at her legs until the hair has disappeared .I’ve change her diet completely .I now cook her food and she is still bi
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. Small lump on my dog’s throat, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Lumps and bumps on the throat or neck can be caused by a wide range of things. Depending on the lumps size, if it is under the skin or appears on the skin itself, and its location on the throat can all indicate different things.

There are a large number of structures in the neck there ranging from thyroid glands, nerves, salivary glands and even lymph nodes. Illness, disease or irritation can all cause swelling or issues there. You may also see additional symptoms such as trouble swallowing, drooling, lethargy or changes in weight and appetite to help narrow down the cause of the lump. Testing via blood work or an X-ray may help to determine the cause and proper treatment.

Lumps and bumps on the skin can also be caused by allergies such as an allergic reaction or sting, or even an abscess under the skin. Allergies are usually treated with an allergy medication to help stop the response and any itching or redness. Abscesses (cuts or scrapes that get infected and swell with fluid) are usually hot or painful to the touch and may ooze debris. These are usually drained at a vet, and then treated with antibiotics.

If the cause of the lump is not known, your vet may also recommend taking a sample of the lump to send to a Lab. This can help to determine what exactly is causing the lump and how to treat it.

Q. What could be causing my dogs hair to fall out causing bald spots?
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. For the past few months my dog has slowly licked most all of his hair off his legs and lower belly. The skin is now dotted with red sore spots.
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

Q. My dogs skin has become red the vet said its an allergy to fleas yet he has none could it be an allergic reaction to my new carpet.
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. What can I get over the counter for Dermatitis in a 18 pound long haired Doxie?
ANSWER : A. Dermatitis can be caused by a number of things in dogs ranging from allergies, skin infections caused by bacteria or fungus, skin dryness from changes in the weather or too frequent bathing or even from external parasites. Determining the cause of the dermatitis first is best before treating it.

If allergies are thought to be the cause, allergy medication can be given to help relieve symptoms. Your vet can provide you with the correct dosage for your dog’s size of over the counter medications. In more serious cases, stronger allergy medications may need to be prescribed. For dry or flaky skin, using a shampoo that is for sensitive skin or oatmeal based can help soothe it. Lowering the frequency of baths and instead using a pet wipe or baby wipe to keep your dog clean will also help sooth the skin. For external parasites, starting on a preventive treatment plan of flea and tick medication will help stop fleas from biting and allow the skin to heal.

If you suspect a more serious causes such as bacterial or fungal infection, or your dog does not improve with treatment, making a wellness check with your vet is best. Your vet can thoroughly examine the skin and may also recommend additional tests to check for any underlying causes such as infection, hormonal imbalance or illness.

Q. My staff dog loosening her hair down side of her head
ANSWER : A. Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.