Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Since it has been well over two hours at this point, vomiting won’t accomplish anything useful. The effects of chocolate on a pet depends on a few factors: how big the pet is, how much they ate, and how dark the chocolate is. The darker the chocolate, the higher the concentration of theobromine, the ingredient that pets are sensitive to.

Your pet should be seen by your veterinarian right away. Chocolate is a toxin that will affect your pet’s nervous system and can cause seizures and death. It depends on the size of your pet and the amount and concentration of chocolate he consumed. Make sure to take the package with you so you can let your veterinarian know what they’re dealing with. They will do an exam, bloodwork and possibly an ECG to see if the heart is having any arrhythmias.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If you know your dog has consumed chocolate, call your vet and get your dog treated as soon as possible. The first step is to induce vomiting and give multiple doses of activated charcoal to decontaminate. If needed, your pet will be given IV fluids, and sedatives may be given to keep your pet calm.
It can take 6 to 12 hours for symptoms of chocolate poisoning to appear in your dog. So, if you already know your dog`s eaten chocolate, don`t wait for any of the above symptoms to appear, call your vet. If it`s after hours and your veterinarian`s clinic is, call a local emergency vet.
Dark Chocolate: Use a scale of 1.5 ounces per 10 pounds of body weight. That`s 3 ounces for a 20 pound dog. If they`ve ingested that much or more, it`s time to call your vet. Milk Chocolate or Semi-sweet: A poisonous amount would be anything over 3.5 ounces– a standard size Hershey`s bar- for a small 10 pound dog.
Give your dog 3% hydrogen peroxide, one to two teaspoons for every ten pounds of weight. You can squirt this solution to the back of your dog`s tongue using a turkey baster, eye dropper or needless syringe. The taste and foam with prompt vomiting within five to ten minutes after administration.
Chocolate is poisonous to dogs mostly because of its theobromine content, which dogs are unable to metabolize effectively. If your dog eats chocolate, you should monitor them closely and seek veterinary attention if they show any symptoms, or if they are very young, pregnant or have other health concerns.
Hydrogen peroxide 3-percent solution is the recommended medication for making a dog throw up. Luckily, it is something many of us have in our medicine cabinet. It`s also a good idea to include a bottle in your dog`s travel first aid kit.
Inducing vomiting to clear toxins from your dog`s system is best done within two hours of the dog swallowing the offending objects. If you can make your dog vomit within 30 minutes, up to 50 percent of the toxins he ate can be removed.
If vomiting is induced by your veterinarian, he or she will administer an emetic that can be more effective than hydrogen peroxide and administer other follow up treatments. For dogs, your veterinarian will administer apomorphine hydrochloride to induce vomiting. Vomiting usually occurs within 5-10 minutes.
Affected dogs show signs 30 minutes to 4 hours after ingesting the poison. Initially affected dogs become anxious and have an elevated body temperature. Panting is usually seen. Progressively they become worse and staggery.
How much chocolate can I eat a day? Experts say the recommended “dose” is approximately 1 to 2 ounces or 30-60g. Indulge in anything more than that, and you may be consuming too many calories. A 1.45-ounce (41 gram) Hershey`s Special Dark Chocolate Bar has 190 calories.
A good rule, after you suspect your pet had chocolate is to use 3% hydrogen peroxide to induce vomiting. Give 1 tsp of hydrogen peroxide to a small breed dog and up to 3 tsp of 3% hydrogen peroxide for a medium to large dog. You can also administer some activated charcoal to your dog.
After your dog eats chocolate: steps to take at home

Vetted Pet Care suggests taking only three percent solution of Hydrogen Peroxide (not the concentrated six percent solution) and putting 1ml for every pound of body weight (so 16 ml for 16 pounds), into food or in a dropper to feed her to induce vomiting.

The toxic dose for theobromine is reported as 100-150mg per kg body weight, however occasionally problems are observed at doses as low as 20mg/kg. What this means in a practical sense, using 100mg/kg as a guide this equates to: approximately 60 grams of milk chocolate per kg bodyweight.
It is important to give your dog`s digestive system some time to recoup and rest from the vomiting by not feeding your dog for 12-24 hours. You can give your dog small amounts of water to keep them hydrated. Food and large amounts of water will only aggravate your dog`s upset stomach.
Protocol to Help Your Dog Rehydrate

Give water very gradually and slowly. Start off by giving one or two tablespoons every 15 minutes. If your dog vomits the water offered, you may try again in a couple of hours, but this time give ice cubes. If the dog still vomits, see your vet immediately.

After a dog vomits, it`s generally best to withhold food for several hours and observe, but don`t withhold water. 2 If your dog vomits one time and then acts completely normal, you can probably resume your normal feeding routine within six to 12 hours or when the next meal is due.
Prompt attention from a veterinarian should be sought if your dog vomits multiple times in one day or for more than one day in a row. In addition, you should seek veterinary attention if your dog shows the following symptoms accompanied by vomiting: Loss of appetite.
Go To Your Veterinarian Right Away

Your vet will be able to determine the best treatment options based on what your dog has eaten. Typically, if your dog ate a food item like chocolate, or onions your vet will likely induce vomiting to get the foreign bodies out of your dogs` stomach.

One of the most common treatment options for poisoning in dogs is inducing vomiting. Other treatment may include medication to reduce pain and symptoms, overnight monitoring, or IV`s for flushing out the toxins in the system.
Nausea in dogs and cats is a very common problem. In fact, nausea is one of the most common symptoms vets see in pets. This symptom can occur by itself, but is also very common just prior to the act of vomiting.
No. Milk is unlikely to be helpful in the vast majority of poisoning situations and can sometimes make things worse. Most pets are lactose intolerant and giving milk can cause or worsen stomach upset symptoms.
The ASPCA Poison Control estimates that 25 percent of poisoned pets recover within two hours. Even with treatment, one in 100 poisoned pets will die.
For example, a Labrador-sized dog that`s eaten 200g of milk chocolate is likely to have a stomach upset such as vomiting and diarrhoea. At 500g, it`s likely that cardiovascular problems and increased heart rate will be seen. Eating 750g may result in seizures.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Chocolate – one regular chocolate bar and two large gooie gooess. Should I make her vomit? Small 30 lb female sheltie. 14 yrs old.
ANSWER : A. Since it has been well over two hours at this point, vomiting won’t accomplish anything useful. The effects of chocolate on a pet depends on a few factors: how big the pet is, how much they ate, and how dark the chocolate is. The darker the chocolate, the higher the concentration of theobromine, the ingredient that pets are sensitive to.

Your pet should be seen by your veterinarian right away. Chocolate is a toxin that will affect your pet’s nervous system and can cause seizures and death. It depends on the size of your pet and the amount and concentration of chocolate he consumed. Make sure to take the package with you so you can let your veterinarian know what they’re dealing with. They will do an exam, bloodwork and possibly an ECG to see if the heart is having any arrhythmias.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. Hi I have a kelpie puppy I fed her two different puppy food one optimum puppy and the othe purina supercoat but now she vomiting what do I do
ANSWER : A. Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet ( boiled boneless / skinless chicken and plain white rice) in small, frequent amounts. If the vomiting stops, transition to the regular diet. Choose one of the puppy foods you are currently feeding. If she begins vomiting on that diet, withhold food as described above until the vomiting stops, feed a bland diet then resume feeding the other diet. If the vomiting continues, see your veterinarian.

Q. My dog is randomly vomiting what appear to be undigested kibble. His pancreatitis labs are normal, what else could it be?
ANSWER : A. It may be dietary indiscretion, food sensitivity or even gluttonous (rapid) eating. Try withholding food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet (1:1 ratio of plain boiled boneless chicken and plain white rice). Feed in small, frequent amounts waiting at least one hour between feedings. If the vomiting stops, transition slowly to the regular diet. If not, try feeding the regular diet in small, frequent amounts in elevated bowls. Large stones in the bowl or special bowls can be used to slow down eating if necessary. If the vomiting persists, see your veterinarian. Consider abdominal xrays and discuss food elimination trials and allergy testing with your veterinarian.

Q. My maltece are chocolate what do I do
ANSWER : A. This all depends on how much and what kind of chocolate. A small piece of a snickers bar is probably no big deal, but something like bakers chocolate is a different story. Malteses are pretty small dogs so it wouldnt take much for your dog to be in trouble. You should take your dog to the vet where depending on how long ago the chocolate was consumed they can do things to help minimize the effects. Bloodwork will most likely be done to try and determine the extent of the damage. Fluid fherapy alomg with certain drugs can help your dog avoid long term damage. If recently consumed they may even induce vomiting. Like i said, rich chocolate can be very toxic, and it wouldnt take much for a small dog. Good luck

Q. What can I do to make my puppy stop vomiting her food? I have taken her to different pet clinics but she still vomiting. What could it be?
ANSWER : A. Recheck with your veterinarian. Submit a stool sample to diagnose or rule out intestinal parasites which can cause vomiting. If she is a fast eater, slow down her eating by dividing meals or by placing large stones in the bowl for her to eat around. Elevating her bowls may also help. Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet (1:1 ratio of plain boiled boneless chicken and plain white rice). Feed in small, frequent amounts waiting at least one hour between feedings. If the vomiting stops, transition slowly to the regular diet. If not, see your veterinarian. Abdominal xrays or advanced imaging may be indicated.

Q. A smooth haired Jack Russell. She has had diarrhea and vomiting, plus off food. In her sick there were whole brazil nuts original covered in chocolat
ANSWER : A. Brazil nuts are very fatty and too many can cause the signs you are seeing. The chocolate is a concern if she ate a large amount in relation to her weight. If she exhibiting signs of restlessness, increased heart rate or tremors then see your veterinarian. If not, withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet (1:1 ratio of plain boiled boneless chicken and plain white rice). Feed in small, frequent amounts waiting at least one hour between feedings. If the vomiting stops, continue feeding until the stool is normal. Transition slowly to the regular diet. If the vomiting or diarrhea don’t stop, see your veterinarian.

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Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.