gnosis?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Sometimes it resolves spontaneously, it goes away, but can recur in intervals.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Diagnosis is typically made using cytology and biopsy, while treatment involves the use of immunomodulatory drugs such as doxycycline and corticosteroids, in addition to pain medication. The prognosis for cats with pillow foot is generally good, with most achieving a complete remission with appropriate therapy.
Feline plasma cell pododermatitis, often called “pillow foot”, is a condition in which severe inflammation develops on the foot pads of a cat. All four pads may be affected at once, and it is rare for only one paw to be inflamed.
Many different species of bacteria and fungi normally live on your pet`s paw pads, but occasionally these organisms can grow out of control and cause infection. Signs and symptoms of a bacterial infection in the paws include redness, swelling, pain, itching, and drainage.
However, sensitivity is not the only reason why your cat doesn`t like their paws to be touched. In a way, when you hold your cat`s paw, you`re neutralizing their defence mechanism: the claws, which makes your cat feel vulnerable and trapped, and that`s why they bite.
Depending on the nature of the injury it can take between 10 days to three or four weeks for the pet to recover, during which time it may have mobility issues. Another factor to consider is litter tray use, since it is undesirable for cat litter to contaminate an open wound or burn.
Most paw scrapes heal on their own, but if your cat`s wound still hasn`t closed after a week or appears swollen and oozy, make an appointment with your veterinarian.
Cases of canine pododermatitis are common in general practice. One or more feet may be affected. Lesions can spontaneously resolve, wax and wane, or may persist indefinitely (1). Also called pedal folliculitis and furunculosis, the condition is complex, multifactorial, and may be frustrating to diagnose and treat (2).
If your cat has a swollen paw due to trauma, treatment will depend on the type of trauma and the extent of the damage. Small wounds on the paw or leg can be left to heal on their own, but may require antibiotic treatment and/or drainage. For breaks and sprains, the area may need to be supported with a splint or cast.
Paw licking is one way that cats clean themselves — distributing saliva all over their body helps them with grooming. And primping takes up a lot of a cat`s time: “Cats typically spend between 30 and 50 percent of their day grooming themselves, says Dr.
Because of these receptors, cats can feel changes in texture, pressure, and possibly vibrations through their paw pads. But this also means their paw pads are especially sensitive to temperature, pressure, and pain.
But most of our feline friends agree on one important thing: they hate when you touch their paws. Ear rubs and butt scratches are always welcome, but something changes when your hands move toward the paws. Cats can be anything from mildly unhappy to vehemently opposed to having their paws touched.
Paw pads are more than just tiny shock absorbers for cats.

While that is part of their function, they are also very sensitive. Much like whiskers, they contain large concentrations of nerve receptors, making them finely tuned for hunting. Cats can feel texture, pressure, and even vibrations through their paw pads.

Bacterial and fungal paw inflammations often require medication. Your vet will recommend systemic antibiotics for bacterial paw infections in dogs for at least six (6) weeks. If the infection runs deep, the antibiotic treatment can last from around 8-12 weeks.
Once it becomes apparent that your cat has a swollen paw, you need to take a trip to a veterinary clinic. There, the vet will determine the cause of the swelling, as well as treatment options. Injuries and trauma – These will be determined through an examination, sometimes requiring an x-ray, then treated accordingly.
How can I treat my cat`s wound at home? If the wound is minor, you can clean it with mild soap and warm water, then apply an antibiotic ointment and cover it with a bandage. However, if the wound is deep, large, or appears infected, it is best to take your cat to a veterinarian for proper treatment.
Do not apply ointments, creams, disinfectants, or any other chemicals to the wound (unless directed by your veterinarian), as they can interfere with healing.
Healthy dogs should be able to grow new cells easily. But because paw pads are made up of tough keratinized epithelium the healing process can take up to three weeks.
Moisturizing the paw pads with an ointment-based topical balm heals dry, cracked pads. Ointments are more easily absorbed if the paws are first soaked in warm water. Once the ointment is applied, cover the paws with clean, light, breathable dog socks or boots to prevent the dog from licking off the ointment.
At this time, the treatment of choice is oral doxycycline. While doxycycline is an antibiotic, it also has immunomodulating properties and we believe it is these properties that are effective in treating plasma cell pododermatitis.
Heat/Ice. Heat increases the flow of blood and nutrients to an area of the body. It can also be useful to reduce morning stiffness and relieve pain in sore muscles. Cold therapy reduces blood flow and is used to reduce swelling and the pain associated with swelling.
When you notice a cat swollen paw no pain, it doesn`t always mean that there is not a problem, or the problem will go away on its own. One example of a condition with a swollen cat paw no pain is feline plasma cell pododermatitis, aka. “pillow paw”.
Some cats will grooms themselves immediately after you pet them to eliminate your scent and even out their own scent. Displacement behavior.
Your cat`s feet should always be kept clean.

Aside from causing pain, unhealthy substances that stick to her feet may end up on her tongue during grooming. Once each day, give your cat`s paws a gentle wipe with a damp cloth, checking between her toes and around the paw pads.

Signs of an infection in the paws include licking and chewing the paws, redness, swelling, pain, itching, and drainage. Typically, the skin between the toes and other skin folds is affected with itching, redness, and greasy discharge. Sometimes, brown discoloration of the nails.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. i believe my cat is pregnant but showing signs of being in heat
ANSWER : A. Cats are induced ovulators, meaning they will continue to go into heat until they are bred, or spayed (reproductive organs removed). If your cat is showing signs of being in heat (excessive yowling, presenting her rear to you for inspection, attempting to get out or other cats hanging near your house) and you don’t want kittens, it is best to have her spayed. Most cats are also semi-seasonal in their heat cycle meaning they will more likely be in heat through Spring-Summer than in Fall-Winter.

Pregnancy in cats lasts about 60 days. Signs of pregnancy may include weight gain, increased appetite, nipples that become pronounced or “leak” and seeking nesting areas to deliver kittens. If you saw that your cat was in heat, or had her mated, you can use the date she was bred to determine when she may be due for kittens. Your local vet can help determine if she is indeed pregnant and can also take an X-ray to determine the number of kittens present if your cat is nearing her due date. Be sure to feed mom a kitten formula in the last few weeks of her pregnancy and during nursing as it will help provide extra beneficial nutrients for both mom and babies.

If you do not want kittens, some very early term pregnancies can be aborted with spaying, otherwise spaying mom is usually done when kittens are weaned from their mom.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. Aggressive young cat attacking my other cat?
ANSWER : A. Aggression among cats can be a sign of stress, especially if one cat has just been introduced, or if the other cat is overly curious/friendly toward the scared one. The best first step is to make sure each cat has their own separate “spaces” where they can go to get away from harassment from the other cat. Up-high bedding, quiet rooms, etc can all help. Make sure each cat also has their own litter box and food/water bowls as cats often do not like to share and this can be a point of aggression between them. Lastly, placing pheromone diffusers or pheromone calming collars on one or both cats may help decrease stress and aggression through the use of cat calming pheromones. Fel-i-way is one of the most common brands.

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.