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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. At this age it is likely to be warts or skin tags forming which do happen later in life. They are benign masses. There is also a possibility that it is a cystitis or possibly a cancerous mass. with this in mind I would recommend a vet examining your dog and possibly doing a biopsy or fine needle aspirate to confirm diagnosis.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Sebaceous cysts: these are smaller bumps that can look like a pimple or a wart. They form from blocked oil glands and may burst and release a pasty white goo. These most commonly occur in breeds with fine hair, like the Poodle and the Bichon Frise.
A tumor can either be benign or malignant. Dr. Whittenburg notes, “Cancerous masses may be rapidly growing and therefore seem to appear suddenly.
A hygroma is a fluid-filled swelling surrounded by a thick capsule of fibrous tissue that develops under the skin. Hygromas are typically not painful.
Sebaceous Cysts

A sebaceous cyst occurs when an oil gland is blocked in a dog`s skin. These cysts look like pimples and will eventually burst, releasing a white substance.

In mild cases, benzoyl peroxide alone may be sufficient to resolve canine acne; in more severe cases, long-term benzoyl peroxide may be used to decrease the likelihood of recurrence. “The most common treatment for canine acne is topical benzoyl peroxide.”
See a GP if:

your lump is painful, red or hot. your lump is hard and does not move. your lump lasts more than 2 weeks. a lump grows back after it`s been removed.

Bumps that are cancerous are typically large, hard, painless to the touch and appear spontaneously. The mass will grow in size steadily over the weeks and months. Cancerous lumps that can be felt from the outside of your body can appear in the breast, testicle, or neck, but also in the arms and legs.
Skin Cancers Common in Dogs

These tumors appear as raised wart-like patches or lumps that are firm to the touch and are most often found on the dog`s head, lower legs, rear, and abdomen. Exposure to the sun may be a cause of squamous cell carcinoma, however, there could also be a link to papillomavirus.

Dog Cyst vs Tumor: How Do I Tell The Difference? Cysts are fluid-filled sacs under the skin that are usually easy to move around, while tumors are typically more solid. A cyst also may drain a white, yellow, or green discharge.
A cyst is an abnormal pocket of fluid, like a blister, that can form in many different areas of the body including the skin, genitals and internal organs. A cyst can vary in size from a tiny sac right up to a heavy bag containing litres of fluid.
Many dogs will develop pimple-like skin bumps from underlying medical conditions as well. Common causes for this are allergies to food or environmental allergens, infections including skin mites as well as bacterial or yeast infections, and underlying hormonal problems such as Cushing`s Disease.
Canine acne (chin acne) is also referred to as folliculitis or furunculosis. Folliculitis is an inflammation of the hair follicle. Furunculosis refers to an impacted, pus-filled, infected follicle that ruptures. Canine acne can cause multiple comedones (blackheads) on the chin and lips, where short, coarse hairs grow.
Pustules are a type of pimple that contains yellowish pus. They are larger than whiteheads and blackheads. Pustules appear either as red bumps with white centers or as white bumps that are hard and often tender to the touch. In many cases, the skin around the pustules is red or inflamed.
Don`t use Vaseline as a way to treat hot spots or other skin irritations on your dog. If your pet has any kind of skin disorder, always consult with your veterinarian first.
The majority of puppies who get canine acne tend to develop symptoms when they`re 5-8 months old. Acne in younger dogs can be a quick phase or could last well beyond the 12-18 month mark in specific cases. In most adolescent dog acne cases, the conditions are mild and will go away on their own once they get older.
Sometimes doctors recognize cysts during a physical exam, but they often rely on diagnostic imaging. Diagnostic images help your doctor figure out what`s inside the lump. These types of imaging include ultrasounds, CT scans, MRI scans, and mammograms.
Lipomas are common but benign fatty tumors that grow in the layer just beneath the skin. These tumors most frequently occur in the trunk, armpit and groin areas, but they can also grow internally. It is not uncommon for elderly dogs to develop multiple lipomas, which feel like soft, moveable lumps under the skin.
It depends on how aggressive or advanced the particular cancer is. By the time it`s detected, some dogs will live weeks to months, while others will live for years. Lymphoma patients, for instance, can live several years.
They can feel firm or soft. Benign masses are more likely to be painful to the touch, such as with an abscess. Benign tumors also tend to grow more slowly, and many are smaller than 5 cm (2 inches) at their longest point. Sarcomas (cancerous growths) more often are painless.
“About 10% to 20% of lumps are cancer. The rest are benign.” A doctor can determine the difference through a physical exam and a biopsy if necessary. “A physical exam can hint whether the lump is bad (malignant) or harmless (benign),” says Dr.
Unless you`re sure about the cause of a lump or bump, bring your dog in for an exam. If you see fast growth, redness, swelling, pus, an opening, or if the dog is in pain, make that appointment even sooner.
A pea sized lump in armpit usually means you have a swollen lymph node under arms. Your lymph nodes are parts of lymphatic system and fight off bacteria and infections. If you have noticed a lump developing in your armpit, don`t panic. In most cases, this is nothing serious and it resolves on its own in a few days.
In dogs, the most common type of malignant skin cancer is a mast cell tumor. These tumors are superficial lumps that can be painful. They often swell, frequently bleed and then scab over, only to bleed again a few days later. They should not be squeezed by the owner, as squeezing can make them swell even more.
Of submitted samples, 20% to 40% are reported to be malignant. The most common malignant skin tumors in dogs are mast cell tumors, soft tissue sarcomas, and squamous cell carcinomas. The most common benign canine skin and subcutaneous benign tumors include lipomas, histiocytomas, and perianal gland adenomas.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Don’t know if my question got through. 6 yr old pit and pointer mix. Pimple like bump on hind quarters for a couple of months. Now a 2nd has appeared
ANSWER : A. At this age it is likely to be warts or skin tags forming which do happen later in life. They are benign masses. There is also a possibility that it is a cystitis or possibly a cancerous mass. with this in mind I would recommend a vet examining your dog and possibly doing a biopsy or fine needle aspirate to confirm diagnosis.

Q. Why does my English bulldog have re occurring urinary tract infection since she’s a 8 weeks and she’s 9 months now? And now they say she may have ki
ANSWER : A. As I’m sure your vet has told you it’s pretty unusual for a dog to have had multiple UTI’s starting at 8 weeks of age. I think it’s likely that she has a congential problem, which means something didn’t develop correctly inside or outside her body and it’s making her prone to the UTI’s.

There are a few bladder abnormalities that can contribute to UTIs, including urachal diverticulum (a little pouch or out-cropping of the bladder) and ectopic ureters (the ureters do not enter the bladder at the appropriate spot). On the outside, she could have a redundant vulvar fold, which is predisposing her to trapping fecal matter at her vulva, and the bacteria is ascending up to her bladder and causing recurrent UTIs.

The other possibility of that she got a UTI initially and it was never treated appropriately, i.e. The appropriate antibiotic wasn’t used and it never really resolved, but it seems like it’s coming back. I think this is less likely, as it’s really uncommon to begin with to see UTI’s in dogs this young. I also once saw a 4 month old dog with bladder cancer, but that’s incredibly rare and I think highly unlikely in your dog.

Your question got cut off at the end but it sounded like you were about to say that she may have kidney problems. If that’s right clearly this is becoming a serious problem for her.

Your dog needs a competent vet to work up this problem. It’s likely that she’s going to need some advanced imaging, including possibly an x-ray procedure called a cystogram and possibly an ultrasound. You might consider taking her to a veterinary internal medicine specialist at this point, if one is available in your area.

Q. Pitt and Pointer mix 5 years old. Pimple like bump been on hind quarters for a couple of months. Now another about 1 inch away. Occasionally licks the
ANSWER : A. Could just be a wart. But the only way to know is to get it checked by vrt and maybe biopsied. Best to gind out when small as easily removed. If left to get big much harder to remove.

Q. My Cocker Spaniel keeps getting lumps on her body. She has some on the top of her head that feel soft with about six or so clumped together.
ANSWER : A. Lumps and bumps are very common in dogs. They can be caused by any number of things ranging from allergic reactions, to pockets of infection under the skin, to various tumors and cysts. If the bumps are spreading rapidly, or are very bothersome to your dog it is best to have a vet look at it to make sure it is not serious.

Allergic reaction bumps will often appear as small, red, itchy pockets of bumps anywhere on the body. These are usually treated with an allergy medication or over the counter antihistamine. Abscesses are pockets of infection under the skin that usually are one large bump, however in spreading infections may have other bumps appear. These are often painful or hot to the touch, and may ooze debris that is yellow or greenish in color. Abscesses are usually drained and then an antibiotic given to clear up the infection. Some tumors can also appear as small bumps that begin to spread and their type can be determined through biopsy of the site if other more common causes are ruled out.

Until you can have your vet look at the lumps, it is best to stop your dog from licking or chewing at them. Licking and chewing can cause cuts and scrapes to open, allowing bacteria and infection to spread over the affected area. An Elizabethan collar, or a T-shirt over the affected area can help prevent licking and chewing.

Q. My dog is almost 6 months and she has a bump right underneath where the ribs meet in that upside down V shape. What is it?
ANSWER : A. Bumps can be caused by a number of things including minor allergies to food or environment, cuts or skin infections causing swelling under the skin, or just normal puppy “acne” as your dog enters her “teenage” stage of life. If the bump is not bothersome, it may be best to monitor it for any signs of changing size, becoming bothersome, or if redness appears.

If the bump is red or itchy, it may be good to look into her diet for any common allergens such as wheat, corn, or soy, and to see if the bumps appear anywhere else on the body. If the food is not a culprit, then a daily allergy medication may also help. If the bump is red or hot to the touch, painful, growing quickly, or oozing debris it may indicate an abscess, or infection under the skin, which should be treated by your vet via draining and antibiotics. If your dog is bothered by the area, placing a T-shirt or Elizabethan (cone) collar on her to prevent licking and chewing and spreading infection is best until you can get into your vet.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. I have a 9 week Chihuahua and a 5 yr old Lab mix as well as two cats and we are having a flea plage in my house. How do I get rid of them quickly?
ANSWER : A. You need to use a good flea product like advocate or stronghold. Every four weeks for at least 6 months and house spray like indorex or rip. Because there is nothing that kill fleas in the pupi stage it can take 6 months of continued treatment to get rid of them all as they need to hatch before they will die.

Q. My 4 year old Chihuahua mix began having a series shaking/panting episodes (last 15m- 1hr) out of the blue. Vet’s tests say its not physical.
ANSWER : A. There are many causes for shaking/panting. The shaking and panting are both signs of stress, and your dog may be dealing with anxiety, or stress, related to an event that happened, or is happening. I realize you cannot answer questions on this, however, I will ask some questions that you can ask yourself. Have you recently moved? Have you ever hit or yelled at your dog? Has the weather been bad lately (storms)? Have you had any new guests stay over recently? Have you had any dogs come to your home recently? Have you had any dogs or cats in your yard recently? Was your dog frightened by something initially (a falling pot/pan; a loud bang from the washing machine; a gunshot; a backfiring car/truck; someone screaming in your home/a fight)?

If you answered yes to any of those questions, it could definitely be that. Dogs don’t typically hang on to something for very long, but if it really frightened your pup, then she/he could be feeling serious anxiety related to that specific event, and relating other events to that one.

Do not yell, or hit your dog. I’m not assuming you do, but if you do, please stop doing that right away. It could be that your dog is afraid of you specifically, and you notice the shaking/panting when you are near, because that is the only time your dog is doing it.

If you’d like to purchase a consultation with me (I know, it’s a lot to ask, but I really feel like I could help) I’d be more than happy to ask you many questions, and together we can figure out what the heck is going on here. It’s important that your dog is comfortable, and if your pup is always feeling anxious/uneasy, then his/her quality of life is in jeopardy.

Q. We have a 3 yr old Weiner dog, she is having pus in her eyes, I took her to the vet he gave me derma vet ointment, used it as the doctor prescribed
ANSWER : A. If the pus really isn’t all that bad, and it’s just some discharge, your pup may benefit from a diet change. It could be that the food you’re feeding just isn’t right for your dog, and that’s okay! Dogs grow and change over time, and now that your dog is fully matured, a diet change may be in order. Try something like Taste of the Wild, maybe a grain free dog food, Orijen, or Ziwipeak. These are all really great food options.

If the pus is really bad, and continues to get worse, see your vet again and let them know what’s going on. Maybe you could try a diet change, and then see if there are any improvements.

Remember, you should always gradually change a dogs diet. By gradually, I mean you put a tiny bit of new kibble in with a bowl of the old kibble. Reduce the old kibble by just a few bits of kibble. Throughout the course of at least two weeks (or as long as you want depending on whether or not you want to finish off the old food) you slowly add more of the new kibble while removing some of the old kibble. This makes the process gradual, and won’t cause any tummy-upset in your dog.