Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Licking can sometimes be medical or behaviorally caused. As with any sudden new behavior in your pet, it is a good idea to schedule a wellness exam with your vet to make sure there are not any health issues causing it.

Behaviorally, licking can be an anxiety-related behavior, and may become habitual to your pet. If something stressful is happening in the morning such as people going to work, kids waking up and being noisy, or new routines, it may have caused a sort of “ritual behavior” from your pet in the form of licking. Identifying the stressor may help to break the habit.

Giving your pet a calm place to relax in the morning may help, as may providing a pheromone diffuser to help during any stressful transitions. These release a calming pheromone that can help reduce stress-related behaviors. Also offering something GOOD to lick such as a Kong filled with peanut butter, or an ice cube to move around the house may keep her occupied and licking that instead of your furniture.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

In most cases, dogs will find items that comfort them and remind them of their owner. A pillow fits this role perfectly because owners spend over 7 hours sleeping on it, soaking it with sweat, dead skins, oils, and body scent. Keep in mind dogs have super-sensitive noses.
Dogs are creatures of habit and changes in their routine can make your dog anxious. Repetitive licking releases endorphins and is a way for dogs to self-soothe. In many cases, licking the sofa is an occasional response to occasional stress, loneliness, or boredom. However, it can become a habit if not checked.
Dogs generally wake up early, and since their day is up and running, they want you to get up too. The morning licks are like an alarm clock to get you out of bed. Licks are a mode of greeting you, the loving owner, with a warm “Good morning.” They can be pretty insistent in this regard.
Dogs may lick as an act of submission or to demonstrate affection for their owner or other human/animal. Licking may also be the result of boredom, a means of stress relief, or a way to get attention from their owner.
They`re Marking Their Territory

When a dog licks its bed, especially when first climbing into it, it may just be his way of settling in and getting comfortable. He may also be looking to give the area a clean and spread his scent even more before hanging up his dog leash for the night.

Your scent is a comfort to him and he will use anything he can to feel that comfort. That might mean he steals your pillow. Your dog might be stealing the pillows as a show or an attempt at dominance. In the pack, there is the hierarchy and if you`re clearly not the alpha to your dog, he is.
Dogs licking blankets and furniture may be an indication of boredom, stress, separation anxiety, diet deficiencies, and more. If you`re concerned about your dog`s blanket licking behavior, make sure to monitor it closely and consult your veterinarian.
Distract Your Dog With Something Else

Just remember: shifting the focus away is key! The busier you can keep their mind and the more you can keep them stimulated and engaged, the less likely it will be that they`ll be returning to your pillow, and the happier they will be. A Beagle licking its face after eating.

Dogs have several reasons for staring at their owners, like to communicate with and understand us. Some dogs stare to manipulate owners, as in with begging for food or asking to be let outside. Training and dog sports are good ways to turn focused staring behavior into a positive experience.
Potential medical causes for licking include allergies that cause the skin or paws to itch. Allergies can be airborne, such as pollen or molds in the air. Food allergies can also be an underlying cause for itchy skin which can lead to licking. Dogs can even develop an allergy to fleas or even cats in the house!
Licking is a natural part of the male dog`s behavior. Female dogs will lick their vulva quite vigorously sometimes as they derive pleasure from this activity. Licking the vulva from a sexual perspective could be the sign that your female is coming into heat.
Pica — most often seen in adolescent and adult dogs — is the compulsive urge to consume non-edible items, such as rocks, dirt, cardboard, and clothing. The cause of pica can be either medical or behavioral, and treatment varies based on the underlying cause.
It`s a sign of affection, closeness, and connection, and your `furkid` is saying that it feels safe to be with you. It`s a continuation of the bonding process that began when you and your dog first met each other. Your dog is reassured by your presence and it needs constant confirmation that you are there for him.
It`s normal for puppies and dogs to chew on objects as they explore the world. Chewing accomplishes a number of things for a dog. For young dogs, it`s a way to relieve pain that might be caused by incoming teeth. For older dogs, it`s nature`s way of keeping jaws strong and teeth clean.
By rewarding him when he doesn`t lick, with praise, treats and attention and ignoring him, or withholding your attention when he does lick, you can teach him that if he doesn`t lick, he gets good things in return, Patel says.
Use positive reinforcement training to encourage your dog to stop licking, and give them other activities to stay occupied. Long walks, chew toys, and treats are all good options to present to your dog when you find them obsessively licking objects or themselves.
Look out for “a hard stare, with unblinking eyes and a stiff posture” from your pup, as this constitutes their threatening staring. If your dog or any dog you come across exhibits this behavior, stay cautious, do not make eye contact and back away slowly.
Another study showed that dogs follow the gaze of a human if the human first establishes eye contact with the dog. “So the dog knows the gaze-shift is directed at them.”
Along with superior night vision, dogs have better motion visibility than humans have. However, because their retinas` contain only about one-tenth the concentration of cones (that humans have), dogs do not see colors as humans do. Dogs see like a color-blind human.
Dogs notoriously love their blankets. Whether it`s at home or on the road, it gives them a place to snuggle up and be comfortable. No matter your lifestyle, this is an easy investment that every pet owner can make to improve the quality of life for their animal.
Go ahead and sleep with your dog—it`s perfectly safe, as long as you are both healthy. In fact, sharing your bedroom with your canine companion—as long as he isn`t under the covers—may actually improve your sleep, according to recent research published by Mayo Clinic Proceedings.
Whether you call it humping, mounting or thrusting, the behavior is natural in male and female dogs. For some dogs, it is a response to arousal. For others, it can just be a way to exert dominance and show that they`re the top dog in the house.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Early in the morning she goes licking everything, the bed, pillow and all. Tried giving her water but refuses to drink. Any advice?
ANSWER : A. Licking can sometimes be medical or behaviorally caused. As with any sudden new behavior in your pet, it is a good idea to schedule a wellness exam with your vet to make sure there are not any health issues causing it.

Behaviorally, licking can be an anxiety-related behavior, and may become habitual to your pet. If something stressful is happening in the morning such as people going to work, kids waking up and being noisy, or new routines, it may have caused a sort of “ritual behavior” from your pet in the form of licking. Identifying the stressor may help to break the habit.

Giving your pet a calm place to relax in the morning may help, as may providing a pheromone diffuser to help during any stressful transitions. These release a calming pheromone that can help reduce stress-related behaviors. Also offering something GOOD to lick such as a Kong filled with peanut butter, or an ice cube to move around the house may keep her occupied and licking that instead of your furniture.

Q. My dog drinks a lot of water, should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Firstly, you should quantify if your dog is actually drinking an excessive amount of water. In a 24 hour period, a dog should drink about 1 fluid ounce (or 30mL) per pound of body weight. Therefore, the recommended amount of water intake (in fluid ounces) equals your dog’s weight (in pounds). For example, if your dog weighs 8 pounds, he/she should drink about a cup of water in a 1 hour period. This will be slightly increased if your dog gets a lot of physical activity or lives outdoors.

You can measure your dog’s water intake the following way: in the morning, measure a specific amount, a little bit more than you think he/she will drink. 24 hours later, measure the remaining amount. If the amount of water your dog drank is significantly greater than it should be, then you should take your dog to a veterinarian.

Causes for mildly increased water consumption include: food changes, increased ambient and body temperature, increased activity, urinary tract infection, and general illness.

Common causes for greatly increased water consumption include: diabetes, urinary tract infection, kidney disease, steroid use, and other systemic diseases. With large increases in water consumption, you will also usually see increased urination. Please take note of urinary patterns to discuss with your vet. Greatly increased drinking and urination is ALWAYS a reason to see a vet.

Q. I moved from an apt to a mobile home and one of my cats is terrified, he will not come out from under the bed. Going on for 3 days, w/o food or water
ANSWER : A. Give your cat time to adjust.. Animals can be quite fragile. Try feeding and watering your cat while she’s under the bed. Maybe give her some wet food (more moisture) every day, add a little bit of water to it, put it under the bed for her to eat, toss some kitty treats under there, give her a bowl of water under the bed.. just make her comfortable under there and act like nothing is unusual. She will eventually come around.

When she does end up coming out from under the bed, don’t make a big deal of it. Continue doing whatever it is you’re doing, and act like she isn’t even there. The more you make a big deal of things, the more she will make a big deal of them too, and it will end up making her more fearful.

Q. Why does my pup lick everything?
ANSWER : A. Puppies are very much like babies and young toddlers, and will explore the world with their mouths. This may include chewing objects, or licking them. Puppies and other more submissive dogs may also lick people as a way to “appease” them and try to gain favor. If your dog is licking objects, then using something such as a no-lick spray and providing appropriate other toys to explore can help curb the behavior. If you are the one being licked, then ignoring your dog or getting up and moving away when the licking begins can help stop the behavior. Be sure, however, to still give your pup lots of praise when NOT licking!

Q. Can I give my dog ice water to drink?
ANSWER : A. Yes, of course you can. However, you do not want to give ice water to your dog when he is already overheating. If your dog is panting, shallow breaths, vomiting, displaying gums of a different color, having diarrhea, or lethargic, do not give him ice water. Ice, ice water, and very cold water all shock your dogs system, and constrict the blood vessels, making your dog hotter in-turn. It could turn deadly.

If your dog is acting normal, and in a cool room, feel free to give him some ice water, or ice cubes! There a fun treat, and you have nothing to worry about. It’s truly only when they’re very hot, or overheating.

FYI, if the dogs are vomiting, panting with shallow breaths, having diarrhea, etc.. please see a vet immediately.

Q. My soon to be 2 year old Beagle/Spaniel mix is giving me a hard time potty training. We take him out but he refuses to go outside but goes on paper
ANSWER : A. Timing is key. Try taking him about 30-min after eating or drinking, playing or napping. Give him at least 10-15 min to do his business and once he does immediately say”Good!” and give a tasty treat. Also don’t rush him back indoors immediately after. Let him enjoy being outside and not view it as a chore only. Pottying should not mean all fun ends. Otherwise, he will hold it until he goes indoors. You can also try moving the paper gradually toward the door you use most often to take him out and again stick to a schedule. You can also try crate training if you have not done so already.

Q. My dog throws up after drinking water, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. If this only happens occasionally (a few times per week or month), and your dog throws up just water, it is not usually an emergency. Consider your dog’s activity before the event – physical activity, stress, elevated temperature, drinking too fast, and inhaling water can cause them to vomit water. Try elevating the bowl, giving him/her small amounts of water at once and waiting a few minutes after the activity.

Even if this has only happened once, if your dog is acting strange afterwards (low level of activity, not eating, etc.) you should visit your veterinarian immediately. Vomiting can be a sign of an obstruction, heat stroke, or a multitude of other causes.

If this happens frequently and you cannot figure out the cause, your dog should also be examined by a veterinarian. Chronic daily vomiting can be a sign of many problems, including a chronic obstruction, other gastrointestinal disease, or a systemic disease.

Q. Does ice or ice water hurt a dog?
ANSWER : A. Ice water and ice do not hurt a dog on their own.. however, when your dog is hot/overheating/panting heavily/obviously too warm, giving them ice or ice water constricts their blood vessels and can actually cause them to overheat. It’s very dangerous to give them ice water when they are suffering from heatstroke, or generally panting/hot. You should only give it to them when they’re not panting/relaxed on a warm/cool day. It’s okay to give it to them on a hot day, just be sure they are not too hot themselves before you give it to them.