ing this?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. if the symptoms disappear in a few hours then most likely she has allergy to one of plants, flowers or grass. It is possible to test for allergies – you should contact your vet to discuss it.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If your cat has symptoms similar to a human cold (watery eyes, sneezing, runny nose) then your feline friend is likely suffering from a cat cold or feline upper respiratory infection.
Feline upper respiratory tract infections are a frequent cause of sneezing in cats; often with goopy, green or blood-tinged snot and watery eyes. The cat may sound congested and cough or gag. An infected cat may have thick discharge from its eyes and have difficulty holding its eyes open.
If your cat is an outdoor cat, they might be exposed to something foreign while exploring. This foreign object, such as grass, a flower, or an allergen, can get stuck in the cat`s nose. To expel that, cats will sneeze, just as we would if we get something foreign up our nose.
Goopy or sticky eye discharge is typically a sign of infection. A clear discharge often indicates a viral infection whereas green or yellow discharge suggests that your cat has a bacterial infection.
A small amount of cat eye discharge is probably nothing to worry about. “While technically a normal eye should not have any ocular discharge, a small amount of clear discharge, which may dry and appear slightly brown and crusty, may be OK,” Dr. Kimmitt says.
Symptoms Seen most commonly in kittens, symptoms include fever, sneezing, discharge from the eyes and nose, conjunctivitis and occasionally ulcers on the surface of the eye. Ulcers may also develop on the tongue. Anorexia can be a problem, especially in kittens, leading to dehydration.
A cat with allergies or a cold may start to sneeze, and cats can be infected with viruses, pathogens, and bacteria that can all cause these problems. If your cat is sneezing a lot for several days or if she shows other signs of being sick, you should take her to the veterinarian to be examined.
If your cat is sneezing more than normal, it`s more than likely that your feline friend has an upper respiratory infection or URI. The most widespread respiratory infection is Feline Herpesvirus or FHV. It`s estimated that as many as 80-90% of all cats are infected with FHV.
Decongestant Medication. Some cats may need decongestants to help them deal with the symptoms of viral respiratory infections. Although there is no way to medically treat the viral infection itself, your cat`s sneezing may be able to be managed with the help of this type of medication.
A cat`s eyes should be cleaned daily if the crusty secretions form; if you do not notice anything in particular, it is sufficient to cleanse them twice a week, in order to keep them healthy.
The most common manifestation is itching skin, either localized to one area or a generalized reaction all over the cat`s body. Another manifestation involves the respiratory system and may result in coughing, sneezing, and wheezing. Sometimes, there may be an associated nasal or ocular (eye) discharge.
Yes, you can remove the gunk from your cat`s eyes, but it`s important to do so gently and carefully to avoid causing any further irritation or injury. Wet a soft cloth or tissue with warm water. Gently wipe away the discharge from the corners of the eye, being careful not to touch the eye itself.
In some cases, cat eye infections will resolve on their own, but otherwise a vet will likely prescribe either eye drops or topical ointment. In more severe cases, oral antibiotics may be needed to address an underlying condition that`s causing the eye infection.
Most cases of sneezing in kittens can be resolved with supportive care, including warming up food to encourage eating, keeping the kitten warm, cleaning the nose and eyes as needed, using a humidifier, and subcutaneous fluids for hydration.
Stringy, white mucus is often a result of allergic conjunctivitis. This allergic reaction may create deposits and material that clump together, settling inside of your eye or under your lower eyelid. People with allergic conjunctivitis may have to pull white, stringy mucus out of their eyes.
Feline leukemia virus can produce external, internal, and behavioral symptoms. Watch for yellowing of the eyes or mouth, pale or ulcerated gums, swollen lymph nodes, unexplained weight loss, and poor coat quality. Breathing problems, diarrhea, fever, and lethargy also characterize FeLV.
No, `cat flu` is an everyday term people use to describe infections in cats caused by two viruses that are not actually influenza viruses. One is feline calicivirus, and the other is a feline herpes virus. These viruses cannot be transmitted to humans.
Most likely your kitten has an upper respiratory infection. They are very contagious, and it is fairly common for kittens and cats newly adopted from shelters to be sneezing or have runny eyes and noses. Calicivirus and herpes viruses are the cause in 90 percent of feline upper respiratory infections.
Your cat stares at you as a way to communicate with you. Your cat may be telling you it`s hungry, scared or simply observing you. The best thing you can do is take in your cat`s body language as a whole instead of just the staring.
Sneezing is a common symptom of upper respiratory infections (URIs) in cats. Often referred to as the “common cold” or the “cat flu”, upper respiratory infections can be viral, bacterial and even fungal, although that`s less common.
If your cat has an allergy and is exposed to the allergen in question, they will probably sneeze, just like a human might. If your cat`s allergies aren`t very serious, or if you can usually avoid the allergens that affect your cat, there may be no need to take any action.
Symptoms of SARS-CoV-2 infection in pets

Some signs of illness in pets may include fever, coughing, difficulty breathing or shortness of breath, lethargy, sneezing, nose or eye discharge, vomiting, or diarrhea.

The sneezing generally lasts for only a few days and goes away on its own, requiring no treatment. If your cat sneezes only occasionally, no treatment is generally needed.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My dog is house trained but has started pooping in the house, why is she doing that?
ANSWER : A. It could be the type of food you are feeding. If you are feeding a lower quality kibble, it will be packed with fillers. These fillers will cause your dog to poop more than is necessary, and it can cause your dog to poop indoors because of the excess poop. Finding a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Orijen, or a high quality food like Ziwipeak, or Honest Kitchen, will help with that issue.

Remember to NEVER scold for accident indoors. The more you scold, the more fearful your dog is of pooping in front of you, the less your dog will want to poop in front of you outdoors, the more he will poop indoors, the more you scold… it’s a vicious cycle.

Have you been cleaning messes with Nature Miracle? Pick up a bottle, and try cleaning with that instead of regular cleaner. It will eliminate the smells deep down (even to your dog), which will discourage him from potting in that spot again.

Maybe he needs to be taken outside more often, and maybe he needs to be kept outside longer each time. He should be allowed at least 10 minutes of roaming outside before he has to come back inside. Allow him 10 minutes every single time you bring him outside, just in case he has to poop. He needs every opportunity you can give him. Bring him outside every hour if he’s full grown, every 40 minutes if he’s an adolescent (6-10 months), and every 30 minutes if he’s a puppy (2-6 months). If you have a doggy door, you should still be bringing your dog outside yourself to encourage him to stay outside longer, and poop. When he does poop outside, you should praise him, and reward him with lots of treats!

Q. We have a 4 yr old lab-pit mix we raise from 6 weeks.If my husband tries to take hin by the collar and make him go out to pottie he growls.Problem?
ANSWER : A. This is not good behavior. Rather than take him by the collar, call him to come with you. If he’s not good about coming when called, you can work on that. Keeps treats on hand to to entice him out and reward him when he does go potty and he’ll come to look forward to it. Clicker training is another great way to teach a dog all kinds of things, from obedience to tricks.

Have treats on hand that you know he loves, then simply click and treat. He will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so he has to come to you. Call and click and when he comes to you for that treat, treat him and give him lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When he comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if he doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If he takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until he comes eagerly. Next, try him off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point he should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If he does not, go back to the last step he performed reliably and work on that again until he responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating him every time, but still praise him. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until he comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time he is overly excited so that he can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something he already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs

Q. We brought 2 new kittens home. One of them is sneezing. We have a Sr cat and an adult who is now coughing. What to do?
ANSWER : A. Commonly respiratory infections (viral -Herpesvirus and Calicivirus- and possibly bacterial) can cause sneezing episodes in kitten especially if not vaccinated yet. If your kitten is affected by respiratory infection could develop or have more signs such as discharge from eyes, more discharge from nose, coughing, being lethargic, depressed and inappetent.

The coughing episodes of the adult cat could be completely unrelated to the cause of sneezing of your new kitten, especially if your adult cat is already vaccinated.

The cause of cough in adult cats are not necessarily related to respiratory problems, heart problems could cause that as well.

Keep the nose and the eyes of your kitten free from discharge, keep your kitten warm and take both of them to your veterinarian as soon as possible to identify the cause and the relationship of the two problems and treat appropriately.

Q. Every time my 9mth old Kitten goes outside she comes back in sneezing and with rather weepy, gunky eyes for a few hours – what could be causing this?
ANSWER : A. if the symptoms disappear in a few hours then most likely she has allergy to one of plants, flowers or grass. It is possible to test for allergies – you should contact your vet to discuss it.

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Our 8 year old Chocolate Lab started sneezing. Violent sneezing; 8 – 15 sneezes. No mucus, no phlegm, she rubs one side of her head & eye is red.
ANSWER : A. Dogs can definitely get allergies to things in the air, so the sneezing, itchiness and red eye could be caused by that. They can also “snork” stuff up their noses – I’ve seen dogs do it with kibble, believe it or not – that then get stuck above the soft palate and cause violent sneezing attacks. Plant material can get inhaled and stuck as well.

Dogs can also get chronic rhinitis (inflammation of the nasal passages) due to infectious (viruses, bacteria, even parasites) causes or immune-mediated causes. Your vet should be able to tell you more after an exam and some testing. She may benefit from anti-histamines or other drugs, but it’s important to figure out the cause so that appropriate treatment can be determined.

Q. I have a 3 year old female Shihtzu she has started doing alot of reverse sneezing at the minute she has a sore ear at the moment is it coming from it.
ANSWER : A. Is your dog being treated for the sore ear? Because the only way I could imagine an ear infection causing reverse sneezing would be that the ear drum had been ruptured, which can definitely happen in chronic, serious ear infections. More likely, probably, is that both conditions (the ear infection and the reverse sneezing) are caused by allergies. So they’re not really related from the standpoint that the ear problem is causing the sneezing, but they’re both coming from the same cause. Make sense?

If she’s not under a veterinarian’s care for this, I’d strongly encourage you to get her there. The ear problems can become chronic and recurrent, and can cause hearing loss. Allergies can be frustrating to treat, but a good vet will work with you to figure out how to help your dog. Good luck, let us know if you’d like to consult about this problem.