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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If your dog was recommended to have dental work it is best to try and get it done as soon as possible. Not being able to properly chew his food could lead to problems with absorption of nutrients and digestive upset from having to breakdown larger pieces of food. A bland diet can help such as boiled chicken and rice, however hamburger may be a little too fatty to be given and can cause continued digestive upset. If you are having trouble affording the dental work, you can also look into this link about how to make veterinary care more affordable: http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/trouble_affording_veterinary_care.html

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Health. Rat Terriers are generally very healthy dogs, and responsible breeders screen their stock for health conditions such as hip dysplasia, patellar luxation (loose kneecaps), Legg-Calve-Perthes disease, and cardiac and eye disorders.
Dental disease is the most common chronic problem in pets, affecting 80% of all dogs by age two. And unfortunately, your Rat Terrier is more likely than other dogs to have problems with her teeth. It starts with tartar build-up on the teeth and progresses to infection of the gums and roots of the teeth.
The Rat Terrier is a generally healthy breed with an average lifespan of 15-18 years.
Heart failure is the leading cause of death in rat terriers, though this typically doesn`t occur until old age. Valvular disease is a common cause of heart failure, and it usually has no symptoms. Your veterinarian may detect valvular disease if your dog has a heart murmur that gets worse over time.
Allergies. There are two main types- food, environmental and Rat Terriers are sensitive to both. Some of the common causes of seasonal allergies include dust, dust mites, pollen, grass, flea bites, or diet. Two common food allergens are chicken and beef but your Rat Terrier can be allergic to many different foods.
Small breed dogs, such as Poodles, Yorkshire Terriers and Chihuahuas, have an increased tendency for dental disease. In addition, dogs with a flatter facial design, also known as brachycephalics, are also at risk. These may include Boxers, Bulldogs, French Bulldogs, and Shih Tzus, to name a few.
With their easy-going dispositions, Rat Terriers make great pets for families with children or older people. They usually adapt well to any situation. The dogs do well in apartments and condos as long as they get their daily walks and runs. And Rat Terriers thrive on love and attention and return it tenfold.
This breed comes in two compact sizes: a miniature Rat Terrier dog that stands 10–13 inches tall, and the standard size that`s 13–18 inches tall. The Rat Terrier lifespan is generally 12–18 years.
The last Guinness World Records holder for “oldest dog living” was Jake the Rat Terrier, who lived with his pet parent, Ronald W. Johnson, in Davenport, Iowa. Jake was born July 21, 1994, and passed away just days after his 21st birthday in 2015.
Infections, parasites, and cancer are some of the most common types of diseases and disorders in rats. Providing a balanced diet, proper housing, and routine veterinary care will help maintain your rat in the best condition possible.
Dogs need food and water to survive. However, if they are otherwise well, they can survive for around 5 days without food, as long as they are drinking.
If they get bored or lonely, they can become destructive. Rat Terriers are prone to separation anxiety (especially when they`re young), so crate training is strongly advised.
When you notice your rat doing something abnormal, consider whether it could be a sign of illness or pain. Some common behaviors associated with rat health problems include a hunched posture, staring, stumbling, head tilt, failure to groom, sneezing, and wheezing.
Rat terriers are basically little bundles of joy when it comes to their temperament. They have a very strong bond with their owner and can be a very lovable pet for the right family; however, they are not particularly good with small children because of their small and dainty leg structure.
A good family pet, Rat Terriers are amazingly perceptive and intuitively respond to your moods. They have a great desire to please, love praise, and will follow you around the house.
Dogs in serious pain may stop eating, ignore their chew toys, have foul breath, and may paw at or rub their face on the ground. A quick mouth check may reveal swelling or bleeding in their gums, discolored gums and teeth, or loose or damaged teeth.
Unlike humans, dogs don`t tend to suffer from serious tooth decay, but the majority over the age of three do have dental disease. This comes in four stages, typically beginning with a build-up of plaque and tartar in the mouth which leads to mildly inflamed gums.
But when dogs experience pain while eating, they may eat much less or stop eating entirely. If your dog suddenly refuses to eat or seems disinterested, this can indicate a dental problem. If your dog suddenly has bad breath, it could indicate an infection caused by an abscessed tooth or other gum infection.
Rats feed mainly at dawn and dusk, and drink mostly during the night, so feed your rats twice a day – in the morning and evening. Remove any uneaten food, and change the amount so that they eat all of it and stay a healthy weight.
Dogs should eat at least two meals each day, about 12 hours apart. But a breakfast, lunch, and dinner schedule is an equally great option. If more than 12 hours elapses between meals, the stomach can become hyperacidic causing nausea.
Rat Terriers make wonderful dogs for families living in any size of home. They love people and and are good with other dogs, and even cats, when they`ve been socialized from a young age. They need consistent exercise and and plenty of mental stimulation, too.
Be consistent. Keep up this same method every time your dog barks. Use the command “quiet” consistently and only reward your Rat Terrier when they are quiet. Over time, your pup will realize that barking doesn`t get them anything, while being quiet gets them a tasty treat.
Yes. Rats! Rats have many of the disadvantages of other pet rodents: they`re nocturnal, their cages need a lot of maintenance, they don`t live a long time (1-3 years). But unlike other rodents, they`re fantastically friendly and smart if they grow up being lovingly handled by human companions.
Personality. The Rat Terrier is extremely energetic, agile, and athletic. He can be quite talkative, making a variety of vocalizations to express his feelings.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Have rat terrier male about 8year has upset stomach blood test ok said needed teeth work but teeth aren’t that bad if we feed him rice and hambburg
ANSWER : A. If your dog was recommended to have dental work it is best to try and get it done as soon as possible. Not being able to properly chew his food could lead to problems with absorption of nutrients and digestive upset from having to breakdown larger pieces of food. A bland diet can help such as boiled chicken and rice, however hamburger may be a little too fatty to be given and can cause continued digestive upset. If you are having trouble affording the dental work, you can also look into this link about how to make veterinary care more affordable: http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/trouble_affording_veterinary_care.html

Read Full Q/A … :

Q. Vet is saying our dog has heartworm based on a sonogram. All tests are negative and he has no cough. I am very confused
ANSWER : A. Very rarely, a dog can have a heartworm infection and still test negative on an antigen test since the antigen tested for is produced only by the female worms. If the heartworms were not fully mature, or there were only male worms present, the antigen test result in infected animals would be falsely negative. This means the test result is negative when the animal is really infected.

An antibody test will be positive even if only one male worm is present. But this test has a downfall, too. Although it is very good at giving positive results when an infection is present, a positive antibody test just means the animal has been exposed to heartworms, but may or may not currently have heartworm disease. A negative antibody test means the animal has never been exposed to heartworms.

If they are actually seeing the heartworms via ultrasound, I would follow precautions by restricting exercise. This requirement might be difficult to adhere to, especially if your dog is accustomed to being active. But your dog’s normal physical activities must be restricted as soon as the diagnosis is confirmed, because physical exertion increases the rate at which the heartworms cause damage in the heart and lungs. The more severe the symptoms, the less activity your dog should have. And the diagnosis should be confirmed. Once a dog tests positive on an antigen test, the diagnosis should be confirmed with an additional—and different—test. Because the treatment regimen for heartworm is both expensive and complex, your veterinarian will want to be absolutely sure that treatment is necessary.

Q. Cat is over 13 years old, blood test show anemia, weight loss, increase appetite, thick nails, very vocal, blood test did not show thyroid disease,tre
ANSWER : A. It is possible another metabolic issue could be causing the anemia and weight loss, or a more in-depth thyroid test is needed beyond the basic panel. Anemia can be caused by a number of things including blood loss from internal or external bleeding, failure to produce enough blood cells, or destruction of the blood cells by the immune system. Looking for causes of anemia may help you to find the underlying cause causing your cat’s symptoms. Additional tests such as ultrasound, further blood work and more may be beneficial.

Q. Has not eaten in 2 days. Noticed a little blood on the fur on her butt. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Blood near the rear can be caused by a number of things. Bright red blood in the stool or around the anus can indicate a problem with the colon or anal region such as constipation, tears, illness or problems with the anal glands.

Blood that is dark or black in the stool can indicate a problem with the upper intestines such as the stomach or small intestine. This is usually considered more serious than bright red stool, however any blood seen is cause for concern. If the blood is seen more than once or twice, making a vet appointment is a must.

If your dog is not eating and is having blood in either her stool or vomit, making an appointment with your local vet is best. Illness, digestive upset or problems with internal organs can all cause these symptoms. In the mean time, a bland diet of plain boiled chicken and plain white rice may help to soothe minor digestive upset until you can get into the vet.

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. Which common foods are poisonous to pets?
ANSWER : A. That’s a great question. As responsible pet owners we need to be aware of food items that can be harmful to our canine or feline companions. Here are some of the most common foods proven to cause illness in our animals at home:

Chocolate: A favorite and irresistible treat amongst most humans, chocolate is considered toxic to dogs. In very small amounts it is usually not a huge issue, but with larger volumes and with darker chocolates pet owners should be concerned. Chocolate contains methylxanthine theobromine, which is similar to caffeine. Chocolate ingestion can cause vomiting, diarrhea, hyperactivity, issues with normal heartbeats, seizures, and in some severe cases, death. It is best to keep your favorite chocolate treats in a good hiding spot and out of reach of your dog or cat.

Grapes and raisins: Dogs should not consume grapes and raisins because of the risk of acute kidney failure. Most dogs experiencing grape or raisin toxicity will begin to have vomiting and/or diarrhea within 6-12 hours of ingestion. Other abnormal clinical signs include lethargy, abdominal pain, dehydration, and tremors. Kidney failure develops within 24-72 hours of the initial ingestion. There are some dogs that do not experience these devastating side effects. It is best to contact your veterinarian or veterinary emergency facility if you believe your pet has ingested grapes or raisins.

Garlic and onions: We often forget that our meals contain these two popular ingredients and will allow our furry companions a few bites or licks. Onion and garlic both can cause a type of poisoning that results in damage to red blood cells, making them more likely to rupture. They can also cause stomach upset and mouth irritation. Look for pale gums, increased breathing or drooling or any vomiting or diarrhea.

Bread dough: Unbaked bread dough is considered poisonous to our pets. The bread dough, when ingested, expands in the stomach because of the warm and moist environment. This can lead to a bloated or even twisted stomach. In addition yeast is often added to our baking products to help get bread to rise, and when this yeast is fermented it produces both carbon dioxide and alcohol. The alcohol produced can be absorbed into the bloodstream and causes dangerous drops in blood sugar, blood pressure and body temperature. Common clinical signs include vomiting or retching, distension of the stomach, weakness and collapse.

Macadamia nuts: Ingestion of these nuts are not proven to be fatal in dogs but can cause them to experience uncomfortable clinical sings, including fever, joint stiffness, vomiting, tremors and difficulty walking, especially in their hind legs. Often your pet will start to feel better after about 48 hours, but supportive veterinary care (such as pain medication) may help ease their discomfort.

Xylitol: The most common ingredient used in sugar-free gum is xylitol, which is a non-caloric sweetener. It is also found in some oral rinses, toothpastes and vitamins. Xylitol and dogs do not mix – it can cause a dangerous drop in blood sugars levels. Dogs will often display signs of disorientation, black tarry stool, tremors and seizures. If severe enough some dogs have developed liver failure. Keep your gum away from your canine companion.

Avocados: Avocados are not actually poisonous to dogs or cats but as many veterinarians can tell you the avocado pits can cause a foreign body obstruction. Avocados contain persin, which is actually toxic to the majority of pet birds. The abnormal clinical signs associated with avocado ingestion in birds include, respiratory distress, inability to perch, liver and kidney failure and sudden death.

Go forth and enjoy your favorite foods, but keep in mind which foods you should avoid sharing with your furry family members. Whenever in doubt, contact your veterinarian for healthy and safe food suggestions.

Q. My puppy is throwing up her food this morning and yellow foamy stuff. Please help!
ANSWER : A. If the vomiting has only occurred once, it may be due to the fact that there was something causing a minor upset stomach in your pup. Yellow foam is often acid, and tummies that are upset or that have been empty for too long can cause this to appear in vomit. It may just be that your puppy needs an extra meal in the day to help keep her stomach happy. Eating a meal too quickly can also cause a pup to vomit up undigested food and foam, and feeding smaller meals more often, or slowing down your dog’s eating can help.

If the vomiting has only happened once, pick up your puppy’s food for an hour or two and then offer a bland meal of plain boiled chicken and plain rice. These bland ingredients can help settle upset stomachs while being enticing “people food”. If the vomiting does not occur again, you can return to a normal feeding schedule.

However, if the vomiting continues, worsens, or new symptoms appear along with it, then it is a good idea to schedule an appointment with your vet to rule out any more serious causes.

Q. My dog is a golden retriever breed. 1 year 5 months. He vomits his dog food out (happy dog brand). And he is having diaherra with occasional blood in
ANSWER : A. Get the GI upset under control first. Withhold food for 12-24 hours. Allow small amounts of water or unflavored PediaLyte. Resume feeding a bland diet (1:1 ratio of plain boiled boneless chicken and plain white rice). Feed in small, frequent amounts waiting at least one hour between feedings. If the vomiting stops, continue feeding until the stool is normal. Transition slowly to the regular diet. If the vomiting or diarrhea don’t stop, see your veterinarian. Discuss food allergies and food elimination trials. Submit a stool sample to rule out intestinal parasites. Elevate the bowls. If he eats fast, feed small frequent meals throughout the day or buy a special bowl to slow down his eating. Follow the link for an example of a “slow feed” bowl.

http://www.pet360.com/product/61729/kong-slow-feed-dog-bowl

You can also add large stones or balls in his bowl so he has to slow down and eat around them.