d I do?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. A puppy that has vomited repeatedly and has diarrhea will become dehydrated quickly. He should be treated by a veterinarian as soon as possible. The vet can give him IV (intravenous) fluids and make sure there’s not another reason for his vomiting, like a piece of corncob stuck in his intestines or something else unrelated to the corn.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Diarrhea

Diarrhea in German Shepherds can be caused by a number of factors, but it`s most commonly caused by food intolerance or parasite. If your dog is having diarrhea regularly, your first step should usually be to check for parasites, which your vet can then help you treat.

A bland diet for a day or two can also help your pooch`s issue. Plain-cooked white rice with a little chicken and some canned plain pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling) could also help your pup`s tummy feel better. Once your dog is feeling better gradually reintroduce their regular food.
Give Your German Shepherd Bland Diet for a Few Days

Try boiled, unseasoned, skinless white meat chicken shredded over plain white rice. For dogs on grain-free diets, substitute mashed over-ripe banana or canned pumpkin. Feed a few spoon-fulls every 2 – 3 hours and gradually increase the quantity over a 24 hour period.

When a German Shepherd Dog experiences idiopathic diarrhea and vomiting, veterinarians generally suspect canine inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). This is because the breed is predisposed to the chronic gastrointestinal condition. A disease that occurs more commonly in middle-aged large-breed dogs, IBD cannot be cured.
Puppies with vomiting and diarrhea should be seen by a vet if any of the following apply: They are lethargic, not acting normally or not wanting to play. The abdomen seems bloated or painful. There is a large amount of fluid being lost through vomiting or diarrhea.
Puppies do not have fully functioning immune systems, so they can be a little more sensitive to changes and potential sources of infection than their adult counterparts. Mild cases of diarrhea may go away quickly on their own, but other causes—including infections and parasites—can be a sign of a serious problem.
Do stick with bland foods. One tried-and-true diet for diarrhea is the BRAT diet: bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast. Low in fiber, bland, and starchy, these foods can help replace lost nutrients and firm up your stools.
Diarrhea in German Shepherd Puppies

Diarrhea issues can be more common in puppies. Their digestive systems are still developing, and playful puppies are more likely than adult dogs to get into things they shouldn`t. If your puppy has occasional diarrhea, especially as they`re adapting to their new home, don`t worry.

It is not uncommon for a puppy to defecate 5-6 times per day. Some will eliminate even more frequently. The good news is that the pace of pooping will slow down as the dog matures. Although a 2-week-old puppy may defecate at every feeding, by 12 weeks, they may be down to only 4 times per day.
Bland, stomach-soothing foods like boiled chicken, rice, and pureed pumpkin can temporarily help your pup manage symptoms while keeping something in their tummies. However, always be sure to consult your veterinarian before introducing a new food into your puppy`s diet.
Some of the signs of parvovirus include lethargy; loss of appetite; abdominal pain and bloating; fever or low body temperature (hypothermia); vomiting; and severe, often bloody, diarrhea. Persistent vomiting and diarrhea can cause rapid dehydration, and damage to the intestines and immune system can cause septic shock.
Several inherited conditions can cause recurring vomiting, diarrhea, or weight loss in your Shepherd. These conditions include pancreatic or intestinal disease, food sensitivities, and food allergies. Some of these problems may begin very early in life.
Signs of a Sick Cat or Sick Dog

Decrease in appetite accompanied by weight loss. Bad breath or foul odor coming from the ears or skin. Excessive thirst or urination. Unexplained aggression or other behavioral changes.

The scent generally associated with parvo is caused by blood in the stool. Dogs with bloody stools because of hookworms have precisely the same smell. MORE IMPORTANTLY, if a puppy is diagnosed with Parvo BEFORE there is blood in the stool, the antivirals` effectiveness is MUCH GREATER.
1) Overfeeding – Many owners are unaware that overfeeding can cause loose stools. This is due to an `overload` of the digestive system, meaning it is unable to absorb what it needs and instead expelling it. This is more common in young puppies with sensitive stomachs but can happen at any age.
If loose stool lasts more than two days, call the vet

“Many cases of diarrhea in dogs and cats are mild and self-limiting,” says Dr. Meredith Miller, associate clinical professor of small animal medicine.

Yes, dogs can eat bananas. In moderation, bananas are a great low-calorie treat for dogs. They`re high in potassium, vitamins, biotin, fiber, and copper. They are low in cholesterol and sodium, but because of their high sugar content, bananas should be given as a treat, not part of your dog`s main diet.
Boredom and Stress Can Cause Puppies To Eat Poop

Though chewing on crates and furniture is more common, some puppies might eat their poop. Consistent, frequent playtime and interaction is important to help prevent this unwanted behavior.

A diet known as BRAT may also quickly relieve diarrhea. BRAT stands for bananas, rice, applesauce, and toast. This diet is effective due to the bland nature of these foods, and the fact that they`re starchy, low-fiber foods. These foods have a binding effect in the digestive tract to make stools bulkier.
Yogurt can usually help with diarrhea. However, if you have an intolerance or allergy to lactose, it may worsen diarrhea. If you have diarrhea and would like to try yogurt as a home remedy, choose a brand that contains probiotics and is low in sugar.
Just like humans, stomach upsets in dogs are often due to eating something that doesn???t agree with them. With German Shepherds, their sensitive digestive system makes them even more prone to these issues. This is why it is worth considering a breed-specific diet for German Shepherds.
German Shepherds: Like Labrador Retrievers, German Shepherds are people pleasers. Known for their working dog mentalities, German Shepherds do best when they have a job. Protecting and being with their owners might be one of their favorite tasks of all, but when separated this breed can show severe anxiety symptoms.
Ideally, you should bathe your German Shepherd puppy two or three times a year to preserve the coat`s natural oils, which protect his skin and undercoat. “Young puppies in particular really don`t need to be bathed often,” says American Kennel Club Judge and German Shepherd Dog expert Dr. Carmen Battaglia.
Most healthy, adult dogs will readily go to the bathroom an hour or so after a meal. They can, however, hold their stool much longer if necessary. In fact, for the most part, a healthy adult dog can hold their stool for 12 hours or more.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Hi my names jesse, I have a 8 week old German sheppard mix pupp. They feed him korn and know he threw up 3 times and has diahrea. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. A puppy that has vomited repeatedly and has diarrhea will become dehydrated quickly. He should be treated by a veterinarian as soon as possible. The vet can give him IV (intravenous) fluids and make sure there’s not another reason for his vomiting, like a piece of corncob stuck in his intestines or something else unrelated to the corn.

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. Hi I just bought a German shepherd who is almost 3 months old, h has gotten his 1st puppy shots from his previous owner, what other shots does he need
ANSWER : A. Puppies should be given 3 rounds of vaccinations, ideally at 8, 12, and 16 weeks. Typically the vaccination against distemper and parvo (that’s one vaccination against 2 diseases) is given at all 3 visits. Rabies is given only once when they are 16 weeks old.

Depending on where you live and your puppy’s lifestyle, your vet may also recommend a vaccination against leptosporosis (given at 12 and 16 weeks) and against kennel cough (it varies, but they are usually given two of those as well).

Read Full Q/A … : Aggressive Puppy

Q. I have two 3 week old kittens that I am bottle feeding. The kittens both have diareaa and there buts are red. Is there anything I can do ?
ANSWER : A. Diarrhea in kittens can be caused by many things, including intestinal parasites (very common in kittens), wrong formula, recent changes in diet (from queen’s milk to formula or from one formula to another), and other gastrointestinal upsets. Their bottoms are likely red and irritated from the diarrhea soiling the fur and skin, trapping moisture against the skin and serving as a breeding ground for bacteria. First, stop feeding the formula. Second, collect a fecal sample to be analyzed by your veterinarian for intestinal parasites. Third, call your vet and make an appointment as soon as possible, ideally the same day. Diarrhea in kittens is serious business and can lead to death from dehydration and loss of nutrients. Finally, in place of formula give an electrolyte replacement solution (like Pedialyte for infants/children) – plain, no flavors, no colors – for at least the next 1-2 feedings. This is not the same as a sports drink. After the 1st or 2nd feeding of straight electrolyte replacement solution, start to add formula back into diet at 1/4 strength ( 1 part formula to 3 parts water), The following feeding mix 2 parts formula to 2 parts water. Then, 3 parts formula to 1 part water. Finally, offer full-strength formula. If the diarrhea continues or worsens with increasing amounts of formula, go back to just electrolyte solution and repeat the process.

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. We have a 3 yr old Weiner dog, she is having pus in her eyes, I took her to the vet he gave me derma vet ointment, used it as the doctor prescribed
ANSWER : A. If the pus really isn’t all that bad, and it’s just some discharge, your pup may benefit from a diet change. It could be that the food you’re feeding just isn’t right for your dog, and that’s okay! Dogs grow and change over time, and now that your dog is fully matured, a diet change may be in order. Try something like Taste of the Wild, maybe a grain free dog food, Orijen, or Ziwipeak. These are all really great food options.

If the pus is really bad, and continues to get worse, see your vet again and let them know what’s going on. Maybe you could try a diet change, and then see if there are any improvements.

Remember, you should always gradually change a dogs diet. By gradually, I mean you put a tiny bit of new kibble in with a bowl of the old kibble. Reduce the old kibble by just a few bits of kibble. Throughout the course of at least two weeks (or as long as you want depending on whether or not you want to finish off the old food) you slowly add more of the new kibble while removing some of the old kibble. This makes the process gradual, and won’t cause any tummy-upset in your dog.

Q. How much dry kitten food should my 16 week old kitten be eating?
ANSWER : A. It would actually be better to feed your kitten canned food, as dry food has a lot of carbohydrates. Cats are obligatory carnivores, and not carb-eaters. In order to give you an amount to feed for dry food I would need to know which food you are feeding as they are all different. I suggest you check on the cat food bag. If the bag does not give you an amount, I would not trust it to be a complete food. You should then get a food from a reputable company such as Hill’s Science diet, or similar. As for wet food feed three times daily around 2oz each time, best to feed the pate style food.