Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I would suggest that you have a one on one consultation with a Petcoach consultant such as myself and I would suggest that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class. Puppy class Dog trainers help teach their students everything and anything concerning puppy care and training. They can help you with potty training, biting, chewing, toys, care, commands, ect. Also you will be able to socialize your puppy with other puppies at a young age which you NEED to do! If you have a dog that was never socialized with other dogs it will become fearful and even aggressive and bite other dogs later in life.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

In my experience, there are usually two possible reasons for this behavior. The first is that the dog asks, but the person doesn`t notice, misreads the communication or doesn`t act quickly enough. The second may be that the dog has unintentionally been allowed to have accidents in the house.
Maybe a pup had a bad experience outside with other pets, is scared of loud noises, or wasn`t properly house-trained. Of course, there could be numerous other reasons your puppy won`t go potty outdoors, but there`s no need to worry. This behavior can be fixed, even with the most stubborn puppy!
For most, it will take between four to six months for your puppy to be fully reliable, but it will depend on their size, age and ability to learn. Some puppies can learn how to be toilet trained really quickly in only a few weeks, whereas for some dogs it may take longer and could be up to a year.
Do: Watch the Clock. Give your puppy 15 minutes to do his business. If nothing happens, put him in his crate for another 15 minutes before trying again. If it`s first thing in the morning, he will need to do both #1 and #2—so if he only urinates, return him to his crate for 15 minutes and try again.
Dogs need physical and mental stimulation, and when it is not provided through adequate exercise and training, they will seek stimulation where they can. Getting you to let them in and out, and then actually getting to go in and out, is a great way for them to get a rush and feel in charge all at the same time.
Puppy Night Time Potty Schedule

If possible, take your puppy out right before bedtime for a final potty break. During the night, if you hear your puppy stirring or whining, it`s probably time for a potty break. Most puppies can hold their bladder for 4-6 hours overnight.

Secondly, your puppy may be crying at night to let you know that they want to go to the toilet. When they are young, puppies need to go to the toilet often. It takes a few months before they are dry through the night. Responding to your puppy`s cries if they need to go to the toilet is important for two reasons.
If you catch your dog in the act of peeing where he shouldn`t, make a big noise to catch his attention: Clap loudly, stomp your foot, or call his name. He should stop mid-stream to see what you want, and when he does, immediately take him to the proper peeing place and let him finish there.
The reason puppies hold on outside and then pee immediately once they get back in is that the house is their happy place and the yard is not. As soon as they come inside, their parasympathetic tone increases and only then do they feel the urge to urinate. Your job is simple in theory: make outside a happy place too.
Depending on their age, most puppies poop between four and five times per day, typically shortly after eating. There is a significant difference in bowel movements between dog breeds, and their bowel habits will change as your dog ages.
They can be a useful aid for training, especially at the stage in your puppy`s life when they need to go frequently. Maintenance and cleanup are as simple as tossing the previous pad and laying down another. Versatility is a plus as well: you can use pads part- or full-time to fit your pup`s needs and your lifestyle.
Taking your dog out in the rain

Going outside in the rain WITH your dog is important. Pull out your umbrella, the bigger the better, and take your dog outside on a leash to where he likes to go potty. Shelter your dog with an umbrella to help him stay dry.

Your dog`s refusal to go outside can be caused by a few different things, such as: Medical issues. Separation anxiety. Noise sensitivity.
Even old dogs that are no longer interested in long walks benefit from the stimuli of outdoor sights, sounds, and smells. Dogs are happier when they can spend time with their humans and also get outside for some fresh air when the mood takes them. Bad weather is one reason to limit time outdoors.
According to the AKC, a good rule of thumb is to use your puppy`s age as a guide. Experts say you can usually leave your puppy alone for an hour for each month they`ve been alive after three months of age. For example, at five months of age, your puppy will probably be just fine for five hours.
The eight-hour rule applies differently depending on the age of a dog. Puppies or senior dogs won`t be able to hold their stool as long as adult dogs. Puppies can hold their stool for about an hour for every month old they are. So a puppy that`s 2 months old may only be able to hold their stool for two hours.
Crate training is necessary for when your canine is a puppy—sleeping in a crate at night teaches puppies how to control their bladder and bowels since they don`t like to relieve themselves in the same space that they sleep. Kennels are also excellent for the times that no one can be home to supervise your new puppy.
Dog feces commonly contain roundworm eggs and a variety of other harmful bacteria. Most wastewater treatment systems aren`t designed to remove these parasites, which means they can get discharged back into the waterways, causing harm to the environment.
Flushing dog poop down the toilet – without a bag, only the waste – is perhaps the best disposal method, says the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the National Resources Defense Council.
Peeing while excited is a behavior that your dog may do to show submission or other feelings they are trying to convey. This behavior is more common in puppies and luckily most dogs will outgrow this phase of submissive peeing on their own. But some dogs still urinate inappropriately in their adult years.
Citrus. The citrus smell is arguably the best dog repellent there is. You do not have to do a lot. Simply peel an orange or a lemon next to your dog and you will observe it leaving the spot immediately.
At the top of the list? Citrus. Most dogs can`t stand the taste and smell of oranges, lemons, and grapefruit. Here`s why — plus, how to use their dislike of citrus to your advantage.
A common cause of frequent peeing in puppies, especially females, is a urine tract infection. Puppies with urine infections will often strain to pass small amounts of urine frequently. And there may sometimes be some blood visible. Urine infections often require treatment with antibiotics.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Husband shamed dog for having an accident inside, and now she won’t poop when he takes her out. Can we fix this? He realizes he erred
ANSWER : A. Good on your husband for realizing that scolding is not the way to potty train! Hopefully these tips can help both him and your pup get back on the right track and make pottying outside successful.

If your dog is still a puppy, that is good news as you may be able to more easily time your potty outings with your dog’s schedule. Even if your dog is older, this schedule may help. Dogs generally have to go potty about 15 minutes after eating, drinking, waking up or playing. Knowing this, get your husband to start taking out your puppy at these key times, so puppy gets used to going out with him, and the urge to potty may be higher than any fear to go. If the potty is successful, have your husband reward the dog with a favorite treat! For bowel movements, dogs may take a little more time, and you may have to stand outside for a while (sometimes even 10 minutes) to give your dog a chance to go. If she doesn’t go, take her back inside and play some, then try again in about 15 minutes. Again, a success equals a treat which most dogs will like right away!

For any indoor potty accidents that occurred, an enzymatic cleaner is great for cleaning up urine and stool. Not only does it remove the stain and smell, but it breaks down the enzymes in the urine and stool your dog can smell, which may deter her from going potty there again.

Q. How do I tech my puppy to tell me when he needs to go outside to go potty?
ANSWER : A. I would suggest that you have a one on one consultation with a Petcoach consultant such as myself and I would suggest that you sign your puppy up for a puppy class. Puppy class Dog trainers help teach their students everything and anything concerning puppy care and training. They can help you with potty training, biting, chewing, toys, care, commands, ect. Also you will be able to socialize your puppy with other puppies at a young age which you NEED to do! If you have a dog that was never socialized with other dogs it will become fearful and even aggressive and bite other dogs later in life.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. What kind of food is recommended for a puppy Labrador and how often should I feed him?
ANSWER : A. Puppy food is designed specifically for the nutritional needs of young and still growing dogs, with twice the daily nutritional requirements that a mature dog needs.

Puppies are growing and developing rapidly — in their bones, muscles, joints, internal organs and immune system, to name but a few of the developmental needs that are being met by nutrition. A well balanced puppy food contains those nutrients that a puppy specifically need for this purpose, nutrients that are not necessary once the puppy has finished growing into a dog and that are not added to adult formula dog foods. For example, to build a strong body, puppy food contains about 30 percent protein, as well as the vitamins and minerals that are needed for a puppy to be healthy.

Q. My nine weeks old puppy keeps peeing inside the house but not outside, is this normal?
ANSWER : A. Remember that your pup is just a tiny little baby. He does not know the rules of the world, and needs to be taught through calm, patient, positive guidance.

You should be bringing him outside so often that he doesn’t have the chance to potty indoors. It is up to you to keep the puppy successful. Bring the pup outside at least every 30 minutes, plus immediately after eating, drinking, training, playing, napping and sleeping. Make sure each time you bring him outside, you stay outside for at least ten minutes to give him a chance to really potty. Immediately AFTER he finishes pottying outdoors, reward him with praise and treats.

If he urinates indoors, do not scold him or you run the risk of making him afraid to pee in front of you, which will make potty training so much more challenging, so DO NOT SCOLD.

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. My dog is house trained but has started pooping in the house, why is she doing that?
ANSWER : A. It could be the type of food you are feeding. If you are feeding a lower quality kibble, it will be packed with fillers. These fillers will cause your dog to poop more than is necessary, and it can cause your dog to poop indoors because of the excess poop. Finding a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Orijen, or a high quality food like Ziwipeak, or Honest Kitchen, will help with that issue.

Remember to NEVER scold for accident indoors. The more you scold, the more fearful your dog is of pooping in front of you, the less your dog will want to poop in front of you outdoors, the more he will poop indoors, the more you scold… it’s a vicious cycle.

Have you been cleaning messes with Nature Miracle? Pick up a bottle, and try cleaning with that instead of regular cleaner. It will eliminate the smells deep down (even to your dog), which will discourage him from potting in that spot again.

Maybe he needs to be taken outside more often, and maybe he needs to be kept outside longer each time. He should be allowed at least 10 minutes of roaming outside before he has to come back inside. Allow him 10 minutes every single time you bring him outside, just in case he has to poop. He needs every opportunity you can give him. Bring him outside every hour if he’s full grown, every 40 minutes if he’s an adolescent (6-10 months), and every 30 minutes if he’s a puppy (2-6 months). If you have a doggy door, you should still be bringing your dog outside yourself to encourage him to stay outside longer, and poop. When he does poop outside, you should praise him, and reward him with lots of treats!

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.