Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. This really depends on a number of factors: (1) the intelligence of your particular parakeet, (2) how often you train, (3) what method you use, (4) how good a trainer you are. Yes, training an animal is all about the trainer. I recommend you purchase a few really good books on training birds using positive reinforcement techniques (giving rewards). Then, plan what you want to train, how often you will train, and when each day. Good luck.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If you don`t make much progress in this area, just accept this is how your budgie is. – It is best to only introduce other members of your household to the budgie when the bird is hand tame. Hand taming may take two days, two weeks or two months to achieve so just persevere every day approaching it all very calmly.
Having a treat in your hand each time that you reach into the cage to change your budgie`s food and water will encourage them to get more comfortable with your hand. This step may take anywhere from several days to several weeks.
Regular handling and holding should take place from 2 weeks of age onward. If you are gentle and the parent birds are used to your presence, it`s fine to gently check the chicks soon after hatching.
No matter how much you think you`re helping, removing or capturing wildlife and keeping it is against the law unless you`re a trained and licensed wildlife rehabilitator. Nestlings are too young to be by themselves and should be in the nest with their mother.
Once birds` eyes open, they can have 3-5 feedings (one every 5 hours). As their feathers start to grow in, they may be fed 2-3 times per day (every 6 hours). Their crops should appear full when they`re done.
Your bird should be a part of your family and you should spend some one-on-one time with him every day, but that doesn`t necessarily mean holding and stroking the bird. Some birds just don`t like human hands on them; they love to hang out and play with their people, but prefer not to be physically touched.
Baby parakeets will attempt to feed themselves at about the time they fledge. Fruits, skinned and chopped into small pieces, are great to start them off. Leave a small plate of chopped fruit in front of the young bird and lift pieces of food from it and feed them. They immediately get the idea.
The stress that captive parrots are under is immense. We house them in cages, we cut their wings, we don`t allow them to be with their own species—you can imagine the stress we put on these animals. Clipped wings and cages guarantee a sedentary life. Heart disease is all too common now.
Don`t try to handle the bird right away. Don`t approach the cage and start talking loudly. Let the bird just sit there, look around, familiarize him or herself with the surroundings, hear new sounds, see new sights, and just get used to things. Perhaps start by putting the cage in a quiet room somewhere.
Most birds (unlike other pets) prefer being petted against their feathers. If your bird is getting relaxed and comfortable with you touching them, you can gradually start rubbing the sides of their head gently, including the skin just behind their beak and around their ears (but be careful around the eyes).
Parakeets, like many other pet birds, often react fondly to music that is serene, peaceful and quiet. Loud music is a no-no for them. Two genres that might put your parakeet`s mind at ease are soft classical and New Age music.
Parakeets play a lot, so toys will keep them very happy, making them more loving pets. Give them shiny toys, swings, rings, bells, etc. Keep your budgie`s cage clean. Budgies appreciate a clean home just like people.
A healthy parakeet will poop every 5 to 10 minutes (6-12 times an hour). Again, this aspect depends heavily on the subspecies of parakeet that you own. Small birds poop more often than adult parakeets. Budgies, for instance, poop every 12 to 15 minutes, for a total of 40-50 times a day.
Just like babies, birds make fussy noises, including squawks and screeches, when they are hungry. This is similar to the behavior of young wild nestlings, which make noises to get their parents` attention and receive more food. A hungry bird will keep visiting its food bowl, hoping for tidbits to appear.
There are several parakeet chick feeds and additives that can be purchased online or in larger pet-stores. These should offer the correct mix of nutrients, vitamins and minerals needed to raise the chicks. Always make sure to consult with an expert before opting for any particular brand.
An angry bird often spends much of his time alone. He might be tense and sit relatively still, or he might tear around the cage destroying things. He might scream or be vocally or physically confrontational. He might destroy his feathers, often in a methodical and deliberate manner.
Loud Noises & Sudden Movements

Parakeets are easily scared by loud noises and sudden movements. If you accidentally drop something or make a sudden movement around your bird, it may become startled and fly away. To avoid this, try to move slowly and calmly around your parakeet.

Screaming or loud vocalization is a natural way for wild parrots and other birds to communicate with each other in their flock environments. They will also scream if they are alarmed. Birds will vocalize if they are frightened, bored, lonely, stressed, or unwell.
It is natural. Its their way of growing. Why would a baby bird constantly cry (even after being fed?) Because it is what chicks (of the avian kind) do, they are either asleep or want feeding.
Parrots are very sensitive to our emotions, sometimes better than we are. Our birds are keen observers of our facial expressions, body language, tone and even energy levels and therefore we have to be cognizant of how our emotions can impact our birds.
So instinctively they are trying to be independent. All baby birds go through this stage – one day they love you, the next day they act like you are a stranger. Be patient with them and they will soon be back to wanting to be handled.
Never Hold a Bird by the Wings, Legs, or Tail

If you must pick up a bird who absolutely refuses to step up, do it safely by gently grasping them in a small towel or with padded gloves that will protect your fingers from bites or scratches.

While a good cuddle might be nice for you and your bird, it is a good idea to avoid excessive petting and to avoid petting the back and body of your bird. A mature bird may find petting in these areas stimulating which may result in a sexually frustrated bird and, in turn, may lead to behavior issues.
The younger you catch them, the easier they are to tame

Unlike an older bird, he will have no memory of a time before the big friendly face and the intruding hand in the cage. Older birds can be a bit trickier.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How do I desensitize my dog to squirrels and stray cats in the neighborhood?
ANSWER : A. It depends on the goal that you have in mind. I am going to assume that you would prefer that your dog not chase squirrels or stray cats in the yard/street. In this case, your options include: (1) training your dog on a “Leave it ” cue using positive reinforcement methods, (2) training your dog not to pull on its leash when it sees a squirrel/stray cat, and (3) training your dog to perform a more desirable behavior when it sees a squirrel/cat.
Training your dog on a cued “leave it” command is useful because it will give you the ability to tell your dog to stay away from any number of undesirable objects on your command. Training your dog to perform a more desireable behavior when it sees a squirrel or cat will substitute a behavior you find acceptable (sitting, laying down, coming to the door, etc.) with a behavior you dislike. Your dog can still react, just in a positive way. If your dog pulls on the leash every time you see a squirrel/cat, training not to pull will make your walk safer and more pleasant.
The ideal training method to use with dogs, or any animal for that matter, is positive reinforcement training, particularly a method called “clicker- training.” The basic concept of positive reinforcement training is to pair a reward (reinforcement) with a behavior you want to increase in frequency. In other words, when your dog performs the behavior you desire, it receives an award, which reinforces the desired behavior so you get more of that behavior. There are many excellent books in stores or on-line that describe positive reinforcement training in detail and many give step-by-step instructions for training common commands like “leave it”. Look for books that specifically mention positive reinforcement training or clicker-training. You can also take dog training classes to learn the techniques, find a mentor who already uses clicker-training, or request a consult from one of the pet experts on this site to guide you.

Q. How long does it usually take to train a new baby parakeet
ANSWER : A. This really depends on a number of factors: (1) the intelligence of your particular parakeet, (2) how often you train, (3) what method you use, (4) how good a trainer you are. Yes, training an animal is all about the trainer. I recommend you purchase a few really good books on training birds using positive reinforcement techniques (giving rewards). Then, plan what you want to train, how often you will train, and when each day. Good luck.

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. My Beagle listens to me, but cries & whines when I’m gone & doesn’t listen to my parents. I adopted him just a couple days ago. Any tips for my folks?
ANSWER : A. I really highly doubt that your Beagle listens to you and has formed a connection with you in just a couple of days. It takes months to build up any kind of serious connection with your dog. You need to work on communication with your dog through training them to understand different cues. For instance the Leave-It cue: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1TS5nA7z5Q

You have to work on bonding with your dog through mental stimulation. Training is very important. Luring each new behavior from scratch, and training using treats is how you form a strong bond with your new dog. No scolding is ever necessary… work on being calm, and positive, all the time.

If your dog is crying/whining when you leave, this may be separation anxiety. You’re going to have to separation train this dog from scratch. This dog needs to learn that separation can be a good thing! Tell your “folks” to NOT scold the dog when he is crying/whining after you leave, because that will make your dog MORE anxious when you leave next time. Your dog will be dwelling on the negative if your parents fuel your dogs negative feelings towards you leaving. FUN things should happen when you leave. Your parents should pull out the treats and start doing some basic obedience training with your dog. Your parents should stuff a Kong filled with awesome treats (peanut butter) and give it to him so he feels happy when you leave.

I have some excellent separation anxiety exercises you can work on. If you’d like, you can purchase a consultation with me, and I will go over how to separation train from scratch. It will make your dog comfortable being alone, guaranteed.

Read Full Q/A … : I Don't Like My Mother

Q. It’s almost impossible to tame my indian ringneck, he’s afraid of everyone if I put my arm under his chest he just flies up doesn’t let me near him?
ANSWER : A. Your best bet is to use positive reinforcement training, particularly a method called “clicker” training. However, this isn’t going to be an overnight fix. You will have to learn how to use the training effectively and plan to put the time in to overcome your pet’s fear. The general concept behind positive reinforcement training is that you use something your bird wants (a reward) to increase positive behaviors. In this case, the positive behavior initially would be not flying away from you. Later, you will be able to add other desirable behaviors within your ringneck’s natural repetoire of behaviors, such as walk into a crate or stepping up on your arm. I recommend that you purchase a book on clicker training. “Don’t Shoot the Dog” by Karen Pryor is a classic. There are also near books geared specifically toward birds (usually parrots but many of the concepts will apply). You may also wish to find a mentor who clicker trains (bird, dog, anything) to learn the basics. I, or one of the other experts on this site, would be happy to consult with you individually to guide you through the first steps of your training. Good luck!

Q. My puppy will be 8 weeks old tomorrow. I’ve had her for a week now, and she still isn’t responding to any training or her name. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. Try clicker training her to come when called. Clicker training is an effective way of training you dog to not only come when called, but can be used to teach a variety of tricks and tasks.

Have treats on hand that you know she loves, then simply click and treat. She will come to associate the sound with getting a treat. Start putting distance between you so she has to come to you. Call and click and when she comes to you for that treat, treat him and give her lots of praise. Move to hiding somewhere in the house, call and click. When she comes to you reliably inside when you call, click and treat. When this behavior is consistent, move outdoors with a very long leash. Call and click, if she doesn’t respond, give a light tug on the leash. If she takes even a single step toward you, click, treat and lots of praise. Keep doing this until she comes eagerly. Next, try her off-leash in a securely fenced area. Call and click. At this point she should be responding well and coming easily to the call and click. If she does not, go back to the last step she performed reliably and work on that again until she responds well. Eventually, you can start not treating her every time, but still praise her. Gradually lessen the frequency of the treats until she comes just to the click and praise.

Keep training sessions short, ten or fifteen minutes to start, no more than 30 minutes at a time and do it a few times a day. Try not to do it any time she is overly excited so that she can pay attention to you. Always end a training session on a good note, even if it is just getting him to do something she already does well on command. And never, NEVER punish a dog when they come to you, no matter how far they’ve made you chase them, no matter how frustrated and angry you might be. That teaches your dog that coming to you is a bad thing.

Q. My puppy has a hard time staying by herself, she cries and chews her crate. How can I make her more comfortable being alone?
ANSWER : A. Crate training is an extremely slow process, so you should be taking baby steps:

First, lure her into the crate with high value treats and close the crate door, then toss several treats inside the crate. During this process do not make eye contact, speak to, or hand-feed her. Toss in more treats and stand up. Then, toss in some more treats and take one step away. Return to the crate, toss more and take a few steps away. Return, toss treats, take 5 steps away. Return, toss treats, take 3 steps away. The key is to randomly change up the length of time you are gone, slowly adding and subtracting seconds. Slowly work your way out of sight. Then, quickly return, and walk out of sight but stay out of sight a few seconds. Return, toss treats, walk out of sight a few more seconds, etc. Take it slowly.

Finally, when you let her out ignore her, don’t make a big deal of it.

Read Full Q/A … : If Your Dog Hates His Crate