er. Be ok?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It depends how much more you gave. You are right to be concerned. I would recommend contacting your vet or emergency vet straight away as they may recommend your cat being put on intravenous fluids for a 24 hours.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If you think your cat has had too much Metacam (an overdose), or another pet has taken it when it wasn`t prescribed for them, you should immediately contact your veterinary practice for advice. Tell the veterinary surgeon the full details of how much was ingested and when.
Weakness, involuntary muscle movements, and seizures may also occur and these are signs of severe toxicity. More severe toxicity (GI perforation or renal failure) may not occur until 48-72 hours after ingestion.
After initial treatment with Metacam 2 mg/ml solution for injection for cats, continue treatment 24 hours later with Metacam 0.5 mg/ml oral suspension for cats at a dosage of 0.05 mg meloxicam/kg body weight.
Metacam ® Oral Suspension for Cats, at a starting dosage of 0.1 mg/kg once on the first day of treatment followed by a dosage of 0.05 mg/kg once daily for four consecutive days in cats suffering from acute musculoskeletal disorder, proved to be efficacious, safe and easy to administer.
Meloxicam has a narrow therapeutic safety margin in cats and clinical signs of overdose may be seen at relatively small overdose levels. In case of overdose, adverse reactions, as listed in section 4.6, are expected to be more severe and more frequent. In case of overdose symptomatic treatment should be initiated.
If ingestion was recent (less than one hour), vomiting may be induced to reduce the amount of medication absorbed. Activated charcoal may also be given in an attempt to reduce absorption. More serious medication illnesses require hospitalization with intravenous fluids. Certain drugs have antidotes that may be needed.
The half-life of Metacam is 24 hours. It means that after 24 h, half of Metacam is already eliminated from your cat`s body. After 2 days, only 1/4 of it remains. It usually takes more than 6 days for Metacam to leave the cat`s system entirely.
Metacam offers 24 hours of relief before the next administration.
Alternatively, METACAM Oral Suspension can be given using the dropper bottle: one drop for each pound of body weight for the 1.5 mg/mL concentration (two drops for each kilogram of body weight). Replace and tighten cap after use.
How Supplied. METACAM Oral Suspension 0.5 mg/mL: 15 mL and 30 mL dropper bottles with measuring syringe. METACAM Oral Suspension 1.5 mg/mL: 10, 32, 100 and 180 mL dropper bottles with measuring syringe.
Cats: Administer a single, one-time subcutaneous dose of meloxicam injection 5 mg/mL solution for injection to cats at a dose of 0.14 mg/lb (0.3 mg/kg) body weight. Use of additional meloxicam or other NSAIDs is contraindicated.
Description: Meloxicam is a non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) of the oxicam class. Each milliliter of METACAM Oral Suspension contains meloxicam equivalent to 0.5 milligrams and sodium benzoate (1.5 milligrams) as a preservative.
The boxed warning on most of these products states: Repeated use of meloxicam in cats has been associated with acute renal failure and death. Do not administer additional injectable or oral meloxicam to cats.
It is safe to give to dogs in the prescribed amount, but care should be taken to avoid overdose. Meloxicam overdose can cause stomach ulcers and kidney failure.
Different toxins affect cats differently, so it can take anywhere from minutes or hours to days for a cat to show signs of poisoning. For example, a lily leaf will make a cat sick immediately, while painkillers may take two to three days before symptoms show.
However, vets still prescribe Metacam (both oral and injectable) with an “off-label” warning label attached. The label reads, “Repeated use of meloxicam (Metacam) in cats has been associated with acute renal failure and death. Do not administer additional injectable or oral meloxicam to cats.
The adverse reactions of Metacam may include lethargy, inappetence, vomiting, diarrhea, stomach ulceration, and haematochezia (bloody stool). These side effects may be seen within the first two weeks of treatment.
In dogs and cats, occasional side effects of Metacam are those seen with NSAIDs, such as loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhoea, blood appearing in the stools, apathy (lack of vitality) and kidney failure. In very rare cases anaphylactoid reactions and elevated liver enzymes have been reported.
Dosage and administration

Treatment is to be continued once daily by oral administration (at 24-hour intervals) at a maintenance dose of 0.1 mg meloxicam/kg body weight.

Alternatively, Metacam Oral Suspension can be given using the dropper bottle: one drop for each pound of body weight for the 1.5 mg/mL concentration (two drops for each kilogram of body weight). Replace and tighten cap after use.
Metacam Oral Suspension 10ml is used to relieve mild to chronic pain and inflammation caused by musco-skeletal conditions. This is a POM-V Product (Prescription Only Medication-Veterinary).
The dose is 0.125 milligram (mg) per kilogram (kg) of body weight once a day. Your doctor may increase the dose as needed. However, the dose is usually not more than 7.5 mg once a day.
Initial treatment is a single oral dose of 0.1 mg meloxicam/kg body weight on the first day. Treatment is to be continued once daily by oral administration (at 24-hour intervals) at a maintenance dose of 0.05 mg meloxicam/kg body weight.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. I gave my 4kg cat slightly too much Metacam liquid 2nd day after dental extractions. She’s been acting mostly normal but I’m worried about her. Be ok?
ANSWER : A. It depends how much more you gave. You are right to be concerned. I would recommend contacting your vet or emergency vet straight away as they may recommend your cat being put on intravenous fluids for a 24 hours.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. I want to know from a veterinarian that has owned indoor cats if they agree with declawing? Also, is the whole digit still removed?
ANSWER : A. I am not a veterinarian, but a certified dog trainer. I have studied cat behavior as well, so I have some knowledge in that area. Cats need their claws in my opinion. When a cat is declawed, it can sometimes cause serious anxiety and frustration in the declawed cat. This is because the cat can not de-stress by digging at a scratching post, and a cat feels defenceless without its nails. It is a sad sight to see when a cat who is declawed is dealing with anxiety. I’ve met declawed cats who seem very unstable. It’s difficult to tell whether or not the cats would be so unstable had they not been declawed, but I’ve never seen a cat who has all of its nails act the way a declawed cat acts.

That’s just my two cents.

Read Full Q/A … : snopes.com: Declawing cats

Q. Cat was vomiting for a few days. Took to vet, received anti-nausea medicine 2 days ago. Drinks and no longer vomits, but won’t eat. I’m worried
ANSWER : A. If your cat has been feeling nauseated, it is possible that the nausea, or just general illness is making him want to eat less. However, you can try enticing him to eat with a few tricks geared to cats.

Warming up wet foods or even bland people foods such as plain chicken or boiled hamburger can make food more interesting to cats. Cats tend to go for aromatic rather than flavorful foods, so making the food as “smelly” as possible may encourage your cat to take a bite. Bland foods are also good for helping to soothe upset stomachs, which may still be happening if your cat had recently had a vomiting episode.

However, if enticing your cat to eat does not work, or he continues to refuse to eat any food, it is best to contact your local veterinarian for more care and testing. Cats can become very ill if they refuse to eat for more than a few days, and finding the underlying cause can help your cat feel better.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.