wait.?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I think it’s very possible that your dog has a problem that is causing her to heal slowly. This is highly unusual, as typically at this point the tissues should be nearly completely mended. The other possibility is that she’s chewing at the site, but I’m assuming you would know that if it was the case.

Cushing’s disease and diabetes can cause wounds to heal slowly. Also the administration of certain drugs, especially corticosteroids, can cause this. I’m sure this is getting difficult and frustrating but I’d urge you to talk to your vet about possible underlying problems, as this is clearly not normal.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Stitches or staples may pop out due to excessive activity and motion causing tension on the wound. Wound infection or wound breakdown (dehiscence) can also lead to stitches and staples coming out.
Opening of the surgical site could lead to a major medical emergency for your dog. If the incision appears to have opened or stitches have come loose, check in with the vet right away. Internal hemorrhage is a serious complication that can be seen on occasion.
Dogs and female cats have internal sutures that provide strength to the tissue as they heal; these will dissolve after approximately four months.
Make a Visit to Your Vet Immediately

Ultimately, there is nothing you can do from home if your dog`s stitches came out or undone. If a suture is pulled out, the risk for events like blood loss, infection, and painful scarring becomes increasingly likely.

Your dog`s wound needs time to heal, and an overly active dog may stretch or rupture their stitches. Limit their activity for a minimum of 7-14 days.
Keep your dog`s bandages clean and dry. You can cover the stitched area carefully with a clean wrap when your pup needs to be outside and remove the wrap when it comes back inside. Put on protective garments to prevent your dog from ripping its stitches and licking its wounds.
How Long Do Stitches in Dogs Take to Heal? On average, a dog`s incisions with stitches take 10-14 days to heal. However, this timeframe is dependent upon a number of factors, including what type of surgery was performed, the suture material, suture absorption time, and your dog`s health and age.
Most skin stitches or sutures are generally removed seven to fourteen days after the operation; the actual time depends on the type of surgery performed. You will be instructed if and when your dog should return for suture removal. In some cases, your veterinarian may use sutures that do not require removal.
Sutures can come undone, especially if a pet has been overly active or licking their incision. If you notice any missing stitches; loose, untied sutures; or gaping or openings at the incision site, contact your veterinarian right away.
If the skin around your wound is red, swollen, hot, painful, or leaking blood or pus, contact your doctor right away. Fever or red streaks around the wound are signs of infection that need to be addressed urgently. If your stitches pop open and you notice your wound pulling away, return to the doctor.
In most cases, your dog will heal just fine without any medical intervention. However, if the wound does not seem to be healing properly, you should take your dog to the vet. One of the ways to check fast and quickly if you have to go see the vet urgently is to use vet chat online.
This happens quite commonly, and when a stitch does come out, it can come to the surface with an inflamed red spot. Usually you can feel something like fishing line around this area.
It is normal to be able to feel internal sutures. While most dissolvable stitches do absorb within about six months, there is a wide range of normal. For example, yours may be gone quicker, or they may take far longer to dissolve completely. Feeling your stitches is not cause for alarm.
The time it takes for dissolvable or absorbable stitches to disappear can vary. Most types should start to dissolve or fall out within a week or two, although it may be a few weeks before they disappear completely. Some may last for several months.
Keep the incision dry. In most cases, you`ll avoid bathing your dog for the first couple of weeks. If it`s wet or raining outside, cover the wound and/or bandage with plastic, and don`t let your dog lay down where it`s wet or muddy.
Excessive licking can irritate the incision site causing inflammation, leading to further infection, and will even cause it to reopen.
There are numerous reasons for wounds not to heal; these can include patient factors, such as underlying disease, aetiology, and poor nutrition, but also surgical factors, such as haemotoma formation and infection.
New soft moist pink tissue should be forming in the area the wound was sustained in. If there is no new soft pink flesh forming where the wound was sustained, and you notice flesh around the wound is looking dark or feeling leathery, this is a bad sign.
Avoid getting the incision wet until the skin has healed completely, about 14 days. This means no baths.
Most absorbable sutures require 60 days to be completely absorbed by the body (hydrolyzed). Not to fear, absorbable stitches lose (dissolve) between 50% of their strength by 7–10 days, meaning the body is well on its way to healing.
Tunneling wounds require careful treatment to prevent them from going deeper and to stop new tunnels from forming. Otherwise, more tissue will be destroyed and infection can spread, leading to further complications. They can even become life threatening. This type of wound must be monitored until it`s fully healed.
They can sometimes take 6–8 months to dissolve and even then, you may feel some hard, bumpy texture to the incision area. Unless it`s swollen and red or warm to the touch, it`s normal. If your dog`s incision area is overly warm or red or swollen or is oozing any exudate, call your vet immediately.
Everything You Need to Know. A recent spay incision should be a clean, straight wound and the edges should be sealed with glue, stitches or staples. The skin will be slightly swollen and a slight reddish-pink color around the edges.
To keep your dog from playing, jumping, and running around after surgery they`re going to need confinement or supervision. When you`re not home you can use their crate, exercise pen, baby gates, or confine them to one room.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Whenever I take my dog on walks he always barks at people and others dogs in my neighborhood. What should I do to resolve the problem
ANSWER : A. The very first thing to do is to make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys.

Figure out what he gets out of barking and remove it. Don’t give your dog the opportunity to continue the barking behavior.

Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. That means don’t give him attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to, don’t touch, or even look at him. When he finally quiets, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. Yelling at him is the equivalent of barking with him.

Get your dog accustomed to whatever causes him to bark. Start with whatever makes him bark at a distance. It must be far enough away that he doesn’t bark when he sees it. Feed him lots of good treats. Move the stimulus a little closer (perhaps as little as a few inches or a few feet to start) and feed treats. If the stimulus moves out of sight, stop giving your dog treats. You want your dog to learn that the appearance of the stimulus leads to good things.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. Oddly, the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

As in all training, always end training on a good note, even if it is just for obeying something very simple, like the ‘sit’ command. If you dog regresses in training, go back to the last thing he did successfully and reinforce that before moving on again. Keep sessions short, 15-20 minutes max, and do this several times a day.

Q. How do I determine how much my overweight pet should weigh?
ANSWER : A. There are many tools to determine overweight and obesity levels in pets. A new tool, morphometric measurements and body fat index, are available to accurately determine a pet’s ideal weight; this will allow an accurate determination of the amount of food a pet should receive to achieve weight loss. Feeding the correct amount will lead to greater weight loss success.

There are many weight loss food options to help pets reach their ideal weight. Your veterinarian can help make a ideal weight recommendation. Here are some tips to help your dog lose weight in a healthy and safe way:

1. Diet: Providing a healthy and well balanced diet is essential to your pet’s overall health. Finding the right food for your dog can be a challenging process. For those overweight animals many commercial dog companies offer weight loss diets, but it is important to evaluate food labels for adequate nutritional content.

You want to ensure you are not missing other essential vitamin or mineral content. Volume of food is also important and the amount of food that works for one breed of dog may not be the same for another breed of dog. Portion control as opposed to free-choice feeding can help your dog to drop a few unnecessary pounds.

There are also prescription weight loss foods designed by veterinary nutritionists, such as Hill’s r/d (http://bit.ly/1AoENSd). Some pet owners find that home cooking is the best option for helping to provide a well-balanced and realistic diet plan. There are websites such as balanceit.com that offers recipes to fit your dog’s specific needs. Consulting with your veterinarian or a veterinary nutritionist to find the appropriate diet is a great way to help your dog be as healthy as possible.

2. Exercise: Another great tactic for weight loss for your dog is exercise. Whether this is through running, walking or playing with a favorite toy all of these are wonderful types of exercise to help keep your dog at a lean and healthy weight.

For those pet owners with busy schedules utilizing professional dog walking services or playtime through dog daycare services is another option. It has been shown that those pet owners that exercise regularly with their pets generally live a healthier lifestyle.

3. Physical therapy: As animals age pet owners offer encounter their favorite canine having more difficulty walking and have a dwindling desire to play with toys. Physical therapy, specifically hydrotherapy is a wonderful way to help older and arthritic animals gain more mobility and lose weight. Hydrotherapy has been proven to have several therapeutic effects on the body including, muscle strengthening, relief of swelling, decreased joint pain, less stiffness in limbs, improved circulation, weight loss, and increased tissue healing to name a few. For more information on the benefits of hydrotherapy:
http://bit.ly/1w1qqoy

4. Veterinary visit and blood work: Weight gain can also be related to underlying health concerns such as hypothyroidism or other endocrine disorders. Scheduling a veterinary evaluation and routine blood work can be another important component in increasing the longevity of your dog’s life. Conditions such as hypothyroidism that predispose dogs to gain weight can be treated with a daily medication to improve hormonal balance. If feel that your dog is unnecessarily overweight there can be an underlying health condition that needs to be addressed.

5. Healthy treats: Pet owners love the chance to reward their favorite canine companion with treats and most dogs jump at the chance to consume these delicious products. The problem is many treats, which can include commercial dog treats or table scrapes can add many unnecessary calories to your dog’s daily intake. Reading labels and making note of the calories in these treats is an important component of understanding your dog’s overall health. Treats should not exceed more than 10 percent of your pet’s daily calories. There are healthier treats that can be offered to your pet to keep calories lower yet provide a fuller sensation. A pet owner can add steamed or pureed vegetables, such as carrots, green beans or sweet potato to add more fiber and thus a fuller feeling for your dog.

Q. I got my female dog sprayed but her internal stitches keep opening up and she has had six surgeries in last 2 weeks to repair . euthanise or wait.?
ANSWER : A. I think it’s very possible that your dog has a problem that is causing her to heal slowly. This is highly unusual, as typically at this point the tissues should be nearly completely mended. The other possibility is that she’s chewing at the site, but I’m assuming you would know that if it was the case.

Cushing’s disease and diabetes can cause wounds to heal slowly. Also the administration of certain drugs, especially corticosteroids, can cause this. I’m sure this is getting difficult and frustrating but I’d urge you to talk to your vet about possible underlying problems, as this is clearly not normal.

Q. Rescued a dog almost two weeks ago, and now that her kennel cough is gone her personality shines!! No previous training, how should I start?
ANSWER : A. POST FOUR:

After your dog is familiar with the behavior you lured from scratch, and taught to your dog, you can start to use the “no-reward marker” I talked about. What you do is ask the dog to perform the behavior, and if the dog does not perform the behavior, you simply say your no-reward marker (choose one: eh-eh, hey, uh-oh, oops) show them the treat, put it behind your back, and BRIEFLY ignore your dog. Just turn your back for a second or two, before turning back to your dog and saying, “let’s try that again.” When you’re ready to start over with your dog, make sure you move around. If you are repeating the same cue while in the same position, while your dog is in the same position, you are likely to receive the same results. The more you move around, and start fresh, the better your chances are of having your dog listen to your cue the second time around. BIG rewards when they dog it successfully! Lots of praise and treats.

My no-reward marker is “hey.” When my dog does something wrong I say, “hey” and she immediately understands that she needs to offer a different behavior. This is clear to her. I don’t have to say it in a mean way, I simply say, “hey” in a normal tone of voice and she understands what the word means.

Once you’ve built up that connection and communication with your new dog, you can work on all kinds of fun behaviors! I personally enjoy the more zen-like behaviors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruy9UMcuGh8

I like to teach my dog fun tricks that offer her a “job” to do of sorts like object retrieval: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4iertZSva8

(object retrieval training completed; what it looks like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jx0Dml28FGY)

Scent-games are fun too! Very confidence building. Hide a REALLY smelly treat in a box, and place that box in a line of boxes. Let your dog go in the room while saying something like “search!” or “find it!” and watch them hunt for that smelly treat! Lots of rewards when they find it!

Q. My dog licks his feet and legs and they are turning brown. He is a white dog. Can you help?
ANSWER : A. Licking the feet and legs can be caused by a number of things in dogs including allergies, illness or even stress behaviors. Allergies are the most common in dogs, with yeast infections coming in second. Allergies can cause the area to become red and itching, making your dog want to lick and chew on them. Over time, the area may become stained from saliva, especially in lighter or white-coated dogs. Yeast infections are also common between the toes, and may cause a smelly “corn chip” smell to appear near your dog’s feet. Again, dogs will attempt to lick and chew to relieve the itch. Keeping the feet clean and dry can help relieve both allergies and infections and pet wipes or a baby wipe of all paws when your dog comes in from outdoors may also help. Keeping your dog from licking the space with either dog booties or an Elizabethan collar is also good as it will prevent secondary infection and staining of the paws and legs. If your dog is determined to keep licking and keeping the feet clean and dry do not help, then your vet can help by providing a medication to treat any infection or provide relief of allergies.

Q. What can I do to stop my dog from barking at people and front doors?
ANSWER : A. Ignore your dog’s barking for as long as it takes him to stop. This means don’t give him any attention at all while he’s barking. Your attention only rewards him for being noisy. Don’t talk to him, don’t touch him, and don’t even look at him. When he finally quiets down, even to take a breath, reward him with a treat. To be successful with this method, you must wait as long as it takes for him to stop barking. If he barks for an hour and you finally get so frustrated that you yell at him to be quiet, the next time he’ll probably bark for an hour and a half. Dogs learns that if they bark long enough you’ll give them attention.

Teach your dog the ‘quiet’ command. It may sound nonsensical, but the first step is to teach your dog to bark on command. Give your dog the command to “speak,” wait for him to bark two or three times, and then stick a tasty treat in front of his nose. When he stops barking to sniff the treat, praise him and give him the treat. Repeat until he starts barking as soon as you say “speak.” Once your dog can reliably bark on command, teach him the “quiet” command. In a calm environment with no distractions, tell him to “speak.” When he starts barking, say “quiet” and stick a treat in front of his nose. Praise him for being quiet and give him the treat.

When your dog starts barking, ask him to do something that’s incompatible with barking. Teach your dog to react to barking stimuli with something that inhibits him from barking, such as lying down in his bed.

Make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good dog and one who is less likely to bark from boredom or frustration. Depending on his breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of fetch and playing with interactive toys.

Q. Why does my dog eat grass?
ANSWER : A. As another user mentioned, dogs can eat grass when they want to vomit. Sometimes, when a dog has an upset tummy, they will eat grass. If you notice your dog eating grass frantically, you can assume vomiting will shortly follow. Grass does not digest and pass normally. If your dog eats too much grass, it can cause serious issues with pooping. Your dogs poop can end up all tangled inside of her, and it can need veterinary assistance to remove it. The same goes for celery, so avoid feeding celery to your dog.

The other day my boyfriend accidentally left the laundry room door open where we were keeping the trash that was filled with cooked chicken bones. She ate one of the chicken bones lightning fast. We had to induce vomiting by feeding her some hydrogen peroxide. After we had fed her the peroxide, she immediately began frantically eating grass because her tummy was upset.

If there is something lacking in your dogs diet, it could be that your dog is eating grass to make up for it. I am sure that my dogs diet is extremely well balanced (I do not only feed her an air-dried raw food-type diet (Ziwipeak), but a wide variety of safe, healthy foods), so when she eats grass, I know that it is because she has an upset tummy.

That is why I think it is important making sure your dog has a very well balanced diet. If your dog is on a low quality kibble, your dog may be trying to let you know by eating grass (or eating poop).

Q. Post-op Spay of a female Siberian husky at 6 months, it’s been 3 days since the operation. What are my limits with her? In detail.
ANSWER : A. Two weeks after surgery you will want to keep exercise to a minimum. Take the dog outside to go potty on a leash to make sure she isn’t running too much. You won’t need to do anything to the wound, unless the doctor used staples then you will need to have a re-check to remove them. Most doctors do not use staples anymore so if you do not have an appointment schedule you are probably fine. IF you have any issues at ALL don’t be afraid to call your vet. Your veterinarian should have given you an E-collar, use that for the entire two weeks. That will help keep your dog from lick and chewing at the incision which is very important. after two weeks your dog should be fully healed. Your dog doesn’t always have to use the e-collar if you’re able to watch the dog. You can take the e-collar off for feeding times as well. Think of the E-collar as your insurance that your dog will not ruin their incision site. If you did not get one and your dog is licking the site please go back to your vet and ask for an e-collar or purchase one at a pet store.