Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Dogs can become inconvenient but would be very unusual at that age. I would start by taking a urine sample to the vets to check for any infection etc. This could cause them to urinate frequently.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

A common cause of frequent peeing in puppies, especially females, is a urine tract infection. Puppies with urine infections will often strain to pass small amounts of urine frequently. And there may sometimes be some blood visible. Urine infections often require treatment with antibiotics.
What causes urinary incontinence in dogs? Pets can be incontinent for many reasons, including abnormalities in parts of the brain and spinal cord that control bladder function, birth defects, and disease. As pets age, they may become incontinent because muscles that hold urine in the bladder weaken.
Urinary incontinence is a condition in dogs that causes the involuntary leakage of urine. If you`ve ever noticed your dog leaving behind a wet spot of urine on his or her bed after they get up from sleeping or unconsciously dribbling urine while walking, your dog is likely experiencing urinary incontinence.
Remember, puppies can`t control their bladder until they`re about 16 weeks old. After that, in general they can only hold their bladder for the same number of hours as the number of months of their age plus one. So, a four-month-old puppy can only hold it for five hours.
Like much of their body, a puppy`s bladder isn`t yet fully developed. Many puppies can only hold their urine for short periods. Frequent accidents could be the result of an overly full bladder, especially if your puppy doesn`t yet recognize the importance of going potty in a designated spot or area.
The most common symptoms of bladder infections in dogs include pain or difficulties urinating, blood in urine or in some cases you may notice that your pup is only urinating very small amounts but frequently. Other signs of bladder infections or urinary tract infections (UTIs) include: Straining to urinate.
“Puppies urinate frequently because their bladders are small and [they] don`t have enough control developed,” Dr. Grewal told The Dodo. Puppies are much smaller than adult dogs, so their bladders are smaller, which means they can`t hold their urine for as long.
It`s an instinctual, physical response called submissive urination, and it`s normal in young dogs. Submissive urination typically happens whenever a dog feels excited, shy, anxious, or scared.
Ectopic ureters: If your puppy is leaking urine, he or she may have ectopic ureters. The ureters carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder. Occasionally, the ureters bypass the bladder and connect farther down, which causes urine to constantly leak.
Causes of Lack of Bladder Control in Dogs

This occurs as a result of urinary tract infection, inflammation, hormone responsive urinary incontinence, a prostatic disease for male dogs and a vestibulovaginal anomaly in female dogs.

In general, by the time your puppy is 4-6 months old, she should have full control of her bladder (which means you can finally start sleeping through the night again!). Once your puppy has bladder control, she should still go out several times a day (three to five total) for bathroom breaks.
Dogs are sometimes unable to control their bladder activity, a medical condition that is often caused by an impaired bladder, or from an obstruction in the bladder. This disorder is medically referred to as incontinence. Incontinence is more common in middle to older-aged dogs, and in larger dog breeds.
If your dog urinates when they are playing or being greeted, but doesn`t exhibit submissive postures, it could be excitement urination. If your dog does not display any of these symptoms, they may be urinating to mark their territory.
Vinegar. Just like citrus, dogs cannot stand the smell of vinegar. It seems that a dog`s heightened sense of smell is not keen on acidic smells, vinegar being another very acidic substance. It is worth noting that dogs are more repelled by the smell of vinegar than they are by lemons and oranges.
Undesirable behaviours such as barking, chewing, counter surfing, house-soiling and jumping up commonly begin to occur at around 3-6 months of age. Your puppy will not grow out of these behaviours. On the contrary, it is more likely that these behaviours will worsen if not addressed early on.
Keep the puppy on a regular feeding schedule and take away their food between meals. Take the puppy out to eliminate first thing in the morning and then once every 30 minutes to an hour. Also, always take them outside after meals or when they wake from a nap.
Dog breeds that may suffer from urinary incontinence

There is also an ectopic ureter congenital defect which may cause dogs to drip urine. Some of the breeds affected include Golden Retrievers, Siberian Huskies, Terriers, and Poodles.

Teaching your puppy to hold their bladder will occur organically through house training. If you remain vigilant with your toilet training, a connection and association will be made with the correct toileting area and puppy will begin to learn to wait until they reach that specific place before they toilet.
Urinary tract infections are serious enough on their own. If left untreated, they can lead to dysfunction of the lower urinary tract, kidney or bladder stones, inflammation of the prostate gland, infertility, blood poisoning, and even kidney infection and kidney failure.
Instead of taking your dog to the vet for at home dog UTI test, you can conduct one at home by purchasing a urine test for dogs. Then you can consult with your vet about the results and get the appropriate treatment and medication.
Puppies have small bladders, without much bladder control. So, in many cases, it`s perfectly normal for puppies to pee more often than you would expect from an adult dog. The general rule of thumb is that your puppy should be able to go as long as their age in months, up to 6-8 hours total, without a bathroom break.
A general rule of thumb is that your canine companion can hold her bladder approximately one hour for every month old they are. Most puppies find their way to a new home at 2-3 months old, so can go 2-3 hours between toilet breaks.
Dog UTI Symptoms

Straining to urinate – Dogs with a UTI might strain to pee and be unable to go at all. They may also arch their backs, cry, or whine when they try to go to the bathroom because of the pain. Blood in the urine – Blood or other discharge in the urine is a sure sign that something is up with your pup.

Four to six months may feel like a long time for a dog to learn to pee outside. What you have to understand is that, while puppies may begin to have control over the bladder at an earlier age, the bladder is not fully formed until about four to six months of age, so they can only hold it for so long.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. I have a 14 week old Husky pup that can’t seem to control his bladder. He urinates while walking, what could it be?
ANSWER : A. Dogs can become inconvenient but would be very unusual at that age. I would start by taking a urine sample to the vets to check for any infection etc. This could cause them to urinate frequently.

Q. Male neutered cat [1 1/2 years old] has just started trying to spray everywhere around the house. Nothing is coming out. No recent changes.
ANSWER : A. Changes in urinary habits can be caused by a number of things, especially in neutered male cats. Attempting to urinate or have accidents in places other than the litter box can often be a sign of a urinary tract infection, or crystals and debris in the bladder causing problems. Pets may need to go more frequently, may dribble or urinate in small amounts more often, may have accidents or may have blood-tinged or cloudy urine.Infections are usually treated with medications and changes to the diet, however in some cases of large stones or crystals surgery may be needed.

Male cats can also experience urinary blockage. This is due to a unique anatomical part or the urethra that forms a U-shape before exiting the body in male cats. If a cat has crystals or other debris in the urine, it can block at this point preventing urine from being able to exit. Cats may attempt to urinate without producing anything, may become very vocal (indicating pain) or may have a hunched back, full abdomen or pain in the abdomen (protecting the very full bladder). Urinary blockage IS a medical emergency so if suspected, your vet or local emergency clinic should be contacted immediately. Treatment usually involves a hospital stay and catheterization of the bladder to remove the blockage and allow urine to drain followed by medications and a change in diet to prevent further problems.

It is best to try and collect a sample of urine and make an appointment for your cat if he has had a change in urinary habits. If you do suspect a blockage, then contact your vet ASAP is best.

Q. My three month puppy is teething and she’s biting everything. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. As you know, this is a normal issue to have with a 3 month old puppy. Be sure that you are never scolding your pup for biting/nipping/teething. This is so natural and normal for them, scolding gives very mixed messages. There are a few things you can do to help teach your pup that nipping on you is inappropriate without the use of scolding.

First off, you should have a toy that YOU own. This toy should be brand new. It should be something like a SOFT braided rope toy. Never allow your pup to play with this toy without you. Never leave this toy on the ground for your pup to play with. Never allow your pup to “”win”” tug games with this toy. This toy disappears when YOU are finished playing with it. This toy is hidden from your pups sight whenever you are finished playing with it. After about a week of keeping this toy hidden from your pup, and only bringing it out when YOU are engaging your puppy in play, you can THEN begin to use it to redirect your pups attention when she nips.

Q. Why does my English bulldog have re occurring urinary tract infection since she’s a 8 weeks and she’s 9 months now? And now they say she may have ki
ANSWER : A. As I’m sure your vet has told you it’s pretty unusual for a dog to have had multiple UTI’s starting at 8 weeks of age. I think it’s likely that she has a congential problem, which means something didn’t develop correctly inside or outside her body and it’s making her prone to the UTI’s.

There are a few bladder abnormalities that can contribute to UTIs, including urachal diverticulum (a little pouch or out-cropping of the bladder) and ectopic ureters (the ureters do not enter the bladder at the appropriate spot). On the outside, she could have a redundant vulvar fold, which is predisposing her to trapping fecal matter at her vulva, and the bacteria is ascending up to her bladder and causing recurrent UTIs.

The other possibility of that she got a UTI initially and it was never treated appropriately, i.e. The appropriate antibiotic wasn’t used and it never really resolved, but it seems like it’s coming back. I think this is less likely, as it’s really uncommon to begin with to see UTI’s in dogs this young. I also once saw a 4 month old dog with bladder cancer, but that’s incredibly rare and I think highly unlikely in your dog.

Your question got cut off at the end but it sounded like you were about to say that she may have kidney problems. If that’s right clearly this is becoming a serious problem for her.

Your dog needs a competent vet to work up this problem. It’s likely that she’s going to need some advanced imaging, including possibly an x-ray procedure called a cystogram and possibly an ultrasound. You might consider taking her to a veterinary internal medicine specialist at this point, if one is available in your area.

Q. Mini schnauzer 5 years old suddenly lost control of bladder. She is also stiff, hunches over and trembles. Vet could not find any wrong with bladder.
ANSWER : A. When you say she has lost control of her bladder do you mean that she is incontinent i.e. urintaes without realizing to do so ? Or is she leaking urine when she lies down ? Or on the opposite she squats more frequently and produces small amounts of urine ? Hoe does the urine look ? Did you take a sample to your vet to be tested ? If nothing was found on clinical exam, she may need further investigations, I would book a follow up appointment as it does sound like she is in pain and there must be something wrong with her.

Q. have a boerboel pup it got its first vaccine when it was about 6 wks old I havnt taken it for the 2nd one (15 days due) my pup looks fine is this bad
ANSWER : A. The pup should be seen by a vet for an exam and to continue the vaccine protocol. Puppies require multiple vaccines since maternal antibodies can block or negate the positive effects. Typically, vaccines are started around 7-8 weeks of age and repeated every 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age. One vaccine at 6 weeks of age is likely insufficient to provide protection leaving your pup at risk of serious infection.

Q. We have a 3 yr old Weiner dog, she is having pus in her eyes, I took her to the vet he gave me derma vet ointment, used it as the doctor prescribed
ANSWER : A. If the pus really isn’t all that bad, and it’s just some discharge, your pup may benefit from a diet change. It could be that the food you’re feeding just isn’t right for your dog, and that’s okay! Dogs grow and change over time, and now that your dog is fully matured, a diet change may be in order. Try something like Taste of the Wild, maybe a grain free dog food, Orijen, or Ziwipeak. These are all really great food options.

If the pus is really bad, and continues to get worse, see your vet again and let them know what’s going on. Maybe you could try a diet change, and then see if there are any improvements.

Remember, you should always gradually change a dogs diet. By gradually, I mean you put a tiny bit of new kibble in with a bowl of the old kibble. Reduce the old kibble by just a few bits of kibble. Throughout the course of at least two weeks (or as long as you want depending on whether or not you want to finish off the old food) you slowly add more of the new kibble while removing some of the old kibble. This makes the process gradual, and won’t cause any tummy-upset in your dog.

Q. My cat seems to have lost control of her bowels and no longer uses her litter box even to urinate. She is 5 or 6 yrs and is in good health otherwise
ANSWER : A. If your cat has had a sudden change in litter box habits, it is always a good idea to rule out any underlying issues with a wellness check from your vet. Bringing in a urine and stool sample if possible can also help as tests can be run on these samples to check for common infections or parasites. If these are present, treating them usually helps resolve the problem of not using the box.

Loss of bowel control usually results in dribbling of feces or urine rather than complete accidents. If you are seeing this, it is possible that an injury to the hind end or problem with the nerves or muscles is happening and should be looked at by your vet.

If the accidents are complete (full amount of stool, big puddle of urine) your cat may be choosing not to use the litter box due to illness, a too-dirty litter, litter pans that are too tall (which may make older cats have a harder time getting in and out), or a litter substrate that was changed too suddenly. Sometimes, changing the environment your cat’s litter box is in by lowering the sides, moving food and water dishes away and returning back to a previously liked litter can help.

In any area of an accident, an enzymatic cleaner should be used. These break down urine and stool particles, making it so that your cat is less likely to be attracted to going there again. Moving stools to the litter box can also entice your cat to start going there again.