Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Always reward the good behaviour immediately after noticing it. If you will notice that he is going to toilet in unwanted place say firmly ” no” and go with the dog to his pad. Remember to always keep his toileting place clean. You can also place some additional pad for him.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Bring your puppy to the potty pad whenever you suspect it`s time. But if he doesn`t go, don`t let him run around and play. Instead, put him back in his crate for 10-15 minutes, then immediately try again. Repeat until he does his business.
Set your dog up for success with where you`ve placed the potty pad, so they are more likely to use it correctly. Avoid busy areas. Choose a quiet place for your dog`s indoor potty spot where they won`t get distracted and potentially wander off their pad in the middle of their business.
Plan on taking your Shih Tzu out many times a day, including whenever they wake up, after meals, and before bed. Use a harness and leash to bring your pup outside and remain in the potty area with them for up to 15 minutes. Give enthusiastic praise and reward when they have gone pee or poo.
Don`t punish your puppy for eliminating in the house. If you find a soiled area, just clean it up. Rubbing your puppy`s nose in it, taking them to the spot and scolding them or any other punishment will only make them afraid of you or afraid to eliminate in your presence. Punishment will do more harm than good.
When she looks as though she`s about to pee or poop, say “potty” (or whatever word you choose) and take her quickly to her pad. Give her lots of praise and a small treat when she “does her business” there. Do not allow her free access to the house yet, as that will only result in making housetraining mistakes.
It typically takes 4-6 months for a puppy to be fully house trained, but some puppies may take up to a year. Size can be a predictor. For instance, smaller breeds have smaller bladders and higher metabolisms and require more frequent trips outside.
Dog Pee Pads

Try using the month/hour principle; most puppies can hold their bladders for one hour per month of age (this rule obviously doesn`t work well with adults). For example, your three month old puppy can probably wait three hours before he needs to be let out.

When your dog goes to the pad to eliminate, quickly pick him up and bring him outside. For some dogs, it is helpful if you bring the pad outside as well so that they can better understand what you are trying to communicate. While your dog is eliminating, pick a phrase like “potty time” or “do your thing” and repeat it.
Shih Tzus are highly sensitive to punishment and yelling, and may misbehave when frightened. Consequently, reward-based methods are best. Use a training clicker and treats to teach your dog commands such as “Sit” and “Stay.” Click the clicker as soon as your dog exhibits the right behavior and then give her a treat.
Something that is generally very effective is vinegar – dogs seem to hate the pungent, acrid smell of vinegar, and its application in a few strategic locations may do the job. Another popular – although sometimes controversial – option is cayenne pepper or strong chili powder.
In a clean spray bottle, mix one cup of distilled white vinegar with one cup of water and 2 teaspoons of baking soda. Shake it up to mix the ingredients, and then spray on the stain. Let it sit for a few minutes, and then blot with towels until clean.
Punish your dog as soon as possible, either during or immediately after you catch him in the act (do not hit him though as this will just make him fearful). This should curb or end his behavior. However, it is just as important to praise and/or reward him when he pees in the right place. Thoroughly clean up the mess.
Your puppy will have an easier time potty training if you provide them a regular spot to do their business. Once you select the best Wee-Wee Pad for your dog, place it somewhere they can easily access and away from heavy foot traffic. A corner of the room where your pet spends most of their time is often ideal.
In the beginning, we suggest covering a wider area with 3-4 potty pads until your puppy learns how to target the pad more precisely. Important note: Although you can leave potty pads in your puppy`s playpen to absorb any accidents they may have, this on its own won`t potty train your puppy.
Never leave pee pads in the crate with your puppy. Not only is it a chewing hazard, but it will also start to teach your puppy that it is ok to pee in their crate. Pee pads can be used in long-term confinement areas for your puppy.
Dogs use the Earth`s magnetic field when they`re relieving themselves. Not only that, but canines choose to do so in a north-south axis, a new study published in the journal Frontiers in Zoology says.
If you catch your puppy misbehaving, try a loud noise such as clapping your hands or a loud “uh-uh” or a sharp “off”. Remember, reprimands need to occur while the behavior is happening, preferably just as it begins, and never after.
There are several different methods to keeping your pet from pooping in your garden, sandbox or playground. In some cases, giving your creating a gravel or kennel area and training your pet to use this specified area to relieve themselves can be very effective.
Dogs will not automatically know to use the potty pad, so training is important—we`ve got your step-by-step guide below. In addition to potty pads themselves, you`ll want a few essential tools in your arsenal. Expect accidents, especially at first!
If you cannot get up at night time or you don`t want to , you may use puppy pads on all available floor space and leave the crate door open. Do not shut the pup in the crate overnight allowing them to soil in it, as this will go against the pups instincts and make toilet training a long and stressful process.
Short answer: it depends on their age, breed, health, temperament, and other factors. To keep your puppy healthy and happy while you`re away, follow this general rule: Puppies younger than 6 months: Leave them alone for 2 hours max at a time. Puppies older than 6 months: Leave them alone for 4 hours max at a time.
Weaning a dog from training pads to the great outdoors is a gradual process that will take some time—but it can be done. The secret is doing it step by step with lots of praise for doing things right. What you would do is move the training pad gradually closer and closer to the door over the course of a week or two.
When it`s time to crate your puppy at night, place the toy inside the crate with her so she can snuggle up to the reassuring smells of her canine siblings. A toy with a virtual heartbeat and warmable insert mimics the reassuring sound and feel of your puppy`s mother.
This will help your puppy learn to aim for a smaller target, making transitioning to going potty outside easier. Start by cutting the pad in half or using a smaller pad, and gradually reduce the size until your puppy is comfortable using a very small pad or no pad at all.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. What is the best way to train your dog on a pee pad? He can go on the pee pad if I bring him to the pad if I don’t he makes an accident.
ANSWER : A. Train your dog using a positive reinforcement method. Since your dog will use the pad when you bring it to him, reward him immediately for urinating on the pad. First, teach your dog to associate the word “good” with a treat (or use a special device called a “clicker” in place of a verbal “good”). Then, say “good” or “click” when you dog urinates on the pee pad and reward him as soon as he finishes. Repeat this training over and over until your dog understands that peeing on the pad equals reward. Then, begin to move the pad away from your dog and bring him to the pad wherever it is. Again, reward when he goes on the pad. It is all about making it “fun” to pee on the pad (reward) and not fun to pee anywhere else (no reward). To learn more about “clicker training” and/or positive reinforcement training, I recommend purchasing a good book on training using positive reinforcement techniques. Or, I or another of the experts on this site, would be happy to consult with you to guide you through the steps and make this a positive experience for both you and your dog.

Q. I have a 2 1/2 mth old Shih Tzu who uses the bathroom on his pad sometimes and others he does not. How can I get him to be more consistent?
ANSWER : A. Always reward the good behaviour immediately after noticing it. If you will notice that he is going to toilet in unwanted place say firmly ” no” and go with the dog to his pad. Remember to always keep his toileting place clean. You can also place some additional pad for him.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Why does a dogs pads on his paws turn such a pink color?
ANSWER : A. I’m confused here. Are your dogs paw pads typically black, but they turn a reddish pink? You may want to see your veterinarian about this to make sure there isn’t anything wrong with his paw pads. I’ve met dogs who have extremely fragile paw pads due to some bad genetics.. they end up getting injured on their paws very easily. I’ve met dogs who are unable to even walk on cement without wearing little doggy booties. It could be that your dog is dealing with some serious discomfort, and you want to get that checked out immediately.

If your dogs paw pads just seem a little bit irritated, you may want to try something like “Musher’s Secret” on them. This is an ointment that you rub on your dogs paw pads to keep them healthy, and smooth. I use this in the winter when there is rock salt all over the ground.. it keeps her paw pads from getting irritated and tearing open. It’s like lotioning your skin to keep it from getting dry and cracked. If you think your dog is dealing with something that is a little more extreme than just some dry irritated paw pads, then see your vet immediately instead of purchasing the Musher’s Secret.

Read Full Q/A … : Discolored Pads in Dogs

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. How do I FINALLY rid all 4 of my cats of tapeworms after 2 years of dealing with it? Fleas seem to be controlled. I know they are the vector.
ANSWER : A. If your cats keep getting tapeworms, then they are picking up fleas from somewhere. Fleas will hitch a ride on your pant leg from outside.

Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

You can also use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the life cycle.