Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It could be that it is normal for him and that he just has stenotic nares, in this case it may be that he often produces snoring noises. See if anything changes as he grows, if it should cause him any problems or if you are concerned, have him checked over.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Heavy breathing in dogs can be caused by upper or lower airway conditions, congestive heart failure, pleural space diseases, pulmonary thromboembolism, abdominal distension and even non-respiratory causes such as stress or metabolic acidosis.
It`s normal for dogs to pant or breathe heavily after exercising (walking or running), playing, or if they are in a hot environment where they need to cool down. In most cases, it is no cause for alarm. If your dog is breathing heavy at rest, it can be a red flag for a number of serious health issues.
Dog breathing problems can range from common allergies to severe heart or lung disease. If you notice issues like excessive panting, coughing, or wheezing, your first step is to have your canine companion checked out by your vet. Your vet can determine the underlying cause of the problem and suggest treatment.
Puppies take more breaths at rest than adult dogs because they are growing and require more oxygen to fuel their quick metabolism and cellular growth. The best way to evaluate your puppy`s breathing rate is while they are sleeping.
This can often cause your dog to be breathing fast but not panting. Injuries, traumas, sore muscles, and gastrointestinal disorders are all reasons. Your dog breathing fast could be due to pneumonia, a tumour on the lung, or laryngeal paralysis. These all lead to heavy breathing or panting.
Dogs that are having trouble breathing often stand with their front legs wider apart to allow their chest to fully expand. They may also stretch their necks. Labored breathing can be accompanied by coughing; pale, gray, or blue/purple gums; or fluid from the mouth or nose.
A puppy breathing fast and panting is perfectly normal when they are anxious, excited, hot, or exercising. But medical reasons for excessive panting include nausea, organ problems and diseases, asthma, birth defects, and even parasites.
Rapid breathing allows a dog`s body to get back to a normal temperature. However, if your dog is breathing above 40 breaths per minute while at rest in a cool and calm environment, or they appear to be struggling to breathe you should seek emergency veterinary care.
Deep Breaths Help

Take a slow, deep breath and blink softly. Wait for your dog to close his mouth and stop panting for even just a brief moment. When he does, say “yes” in a soft voice and calmly bring a treat to his mouth. Continue this until your dog has slowed his breathing.

Panting is your pup`s way of regulating their body temperature, cooling themselves down and allowing water and heat to evaporate from their upper respiratory tract, tongue, and mouth. Dogs can`t sweat to cool themselves down, instead they need to breathe fast to allow air to circulate through their body.
For the majority of puppies, breathing fast is a short-lived and normal effect and shouldn`t worry you. You should only consider talking to a vet if the puppy is breathing fast for prolonged periods of time, or there are other signs of disease. More than likely, you just have a very excitable puppy who won`t calm down!
What Breathing Rate in Puppies Is Considered Normal. Breathing rates in puppies are a bit faster than breathing rates in adult dogs. Adult dogs are likely to take between 10-30/35 breaths per minute, while puppies tend to take about 15-40 breaths per minute.
Puppies tend to have much faster heart and respiratory rates than adult dogs, even at rest. It is not uncommon for them to dream when sleeping and have a fast heart and respiratory rate. As long as his gum and tongue color remain nice and pink, and he is able to play hard I would not worry too much.
If your dog is breathing fast while at rest or sleeping, they could be exhibiting symptoms of respiratory distress. Contact your vet if you notice any of the following signs: Engaging stomach muscles to help breathe. Reluctance to drink, eat or move.
Run a humidifier: A humidifier will loosen and eventually reduce the amount of mucous in your dog`s lungs. A cold-moisture humidifier works best to add moisture to the air in your house. Consider adding a few drops of lavender or eucalyptus oil to the humidifier to make it easier for your dog to breathe indoors.
Signs of heartworm disease may include a mild persistent cough, reluctance to exercise, fatigue after moderate activity, decreased appetite, and weight loss. As heartworm disease progresses, pets may develop heart failure and the appearance of a swollen belly due to excess fluid in the abdomen.
Put them on top of a cool wet towel, cooling mat or place them in the breeze of a fan. Allow the dog to drink small amounts of cool water. Pour cool water over the dog`s feet, ears and head. Never use ice or very cold water as this can cause shock.
On average a healthy dog will take between 15 to 35 breaths per minute when they are resting. (By nature your dog will breathe more heavily and pant when exercising). Therefore, anything more than 40 breaths a minute when your dog is at rest is considered to be abnormal and should be investigated.
If your dog is having an asthma attack you may notice one or more of the following symptoms: Sudden difficulty breathing. Persistent cough. Heavy panting with mouth open.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. I have a 3 month old Pitbull. He breathes heavily at times. It even sounds like if he’s snoring. Is this normal or should I be worried?
ANSWER : A. It could be that it is normal for him and that he just has stenotic nares, in this case it may be that he often produces snoring noises. See if anything changes as he grows, if it should cause him any problems or if you are concerned, have him checked over.

Q. 2 month old Bulldog. While playing gets TOO rough:gripping hand REALLY tight/growling/shaking to the point of drawing blood. Aggresive?Normal?HELP!!
ANSWER : A. For the most part, this sounds pretty normal to me. English Bulldogs can be like this. What you can do is teach him bite inhibition. He needs to know that biting gets him nothing. Each and every time he nips, even gently, you immediately yelp like a puppy would, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore your puppy. Once he is ignoring you, go back to calmly playing with him WITH A TOY. Remember to always use a toy when playing with/petting/interacting with puppies. They will be teething very soon, and they don’t understand that biting you is inappropriate, so using a toy to redirect their attention is important. He needs SOMETHING to bite, or else he will choose your hand. Give him more options.

Another thing you can do is have a toy that YOU OWN. This can be a soft braided rope toy or something of the like. Dot not allow your dog to have this toy whenever he wants. This toy disappears when you are done playing with him with it, and reappears when you want to play. Never allow him to “win” games with this toy. Eventually, the toy will hold so much meaning, when he sees it, he will be instantly interested in the toy instead of your hands.

It also helps to have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/rope toys/soft toys/etc. It comes out for one week, and then disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys in it. This will keep the toys feeling like “new” to your pup and make him less likely to chew on you during play!

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. I just adopted two dogs they have not been in kennels or shelters. Cleared by vet been sneezing coughing loosing breath sounds like asthm
ANSWER : A. It is very uncommon for dogs, especially two dogs who live together to develop asthma. They can however have asthma-like symptoms and this can be caused by aerosolized irritants (i.e. hairsprays, house detergents, painting supplies, etc).
I would investigate and look for causes of irritation in the home. If they are found remove them and I would recommend placing each pet in a small room with an air purifier/humidifier to help clear the airway for about 30 mins- 1 hr for a couple times a day.

If there are no irritants to speak of, then it sounds like a follow-up visit with the vet is needed to further investigate other possibilities (possible re-check lung sounds and/or chest x-rays) of why your pets are still symptomatic and what appropriate treatment is needed to help them get better.

Also just to note that pets don’t have to be kenneled or sheltered to catch kennel cough, they just need any close contact with other pets (such as pet-stores, dog parts, walks in the neighborhood). Kennel cough is highly contagious and is treated successfully in most cases with antibiotics, I like to use Doxycyline or Clavamox.

Q. Why does my English bulldog have re occurring urinary tract infection since she’s a 8 weeks and she’s 9 months now? And now they say she may have ki
ANSWER : A. As I’m sure your vet has told you it’s pretty unusual for a dog to have had multiple UTI’s starting at 8 weeks of age. I think it’s likely that she has a congential problem, which means something didn’t develop correctly inside or outside her body and it’s making her prone to the UTI’s.

There are a few bladder abnormalities that can contribute to UTIs, including urachal diverticulum (a little pouch or out-cropping of the bladder) and ectopic ureters (the ureters do not enter the bladder at the appropriate spot). On the outside, she could have a redundant vulvar fold, which is predisposing her to trapping fecal matter at her vulva, and the bacteria is ascending up to her bladder and causing recurrent UTIs.

The other possibility of that she got a UTI initially and it was never treated appropriately, i.e. The appropriate antibiotic wasn’t used and it never really resolved, but it seems like it’s coming back. I think this is less likely, as it’s really uncommon to begin with to see UTI’s in dogs this young. I also once saw a 4 month old dog with bladder cancer, but that’s incredibly rare and I think highly unlikely in your dog.

Your question got cut off at the end but it sounded like you were about to say that she may have kidney problems. If that’s right clearly this is becoming a serious problem for her.

Your dog needs a competent vet to work up this problem. It’s likely that she’s going to need some advanced imaging, including possibly an x-ray procedure called a cystogram and possibly an ultrasound. You might consider taking her to a veterinary internal medicine specialist at this point, if one is available in your area.

Q. MY Shih Tzu IS 14 YEARS OLD. SHE WILL NOT LIFT HER HEAD UP EVEN WHEN YOU ASK HER IF SHE WANTS A TREAT. NORMALLY WHEN YOU SAY TREAT SHE COMES RUNNING .
ANSWER : A. From what you’re describing I think 2 things are likely. Either your dog has pain in her neck, which is causing her to not want to move her head, or she’s feeling generalized weakness.

Neck pain in small dogs is usually due to disk problems. They get a form of disk disease known as Hansen’s type II chronic disease, where the disk gradually moves upward and presses slowly on the spinal cord, causing pain and weakness.

Generalized weakness can be due to a number of conditions, starting with just not feeling well due to a GI problem (nausea, for example) to something like anemia (low red blood cell count) or heart disease. It sounds very much like your girl isn’t feeling well, and likely need some diagnostics in order to figure out what’s going on. You vet will start with a physical examination and rule out possible neck pain, and then will likely recommend blood work or other tests. If you want to talk to us further we can probably provide more information on a consult, where we can get more details about exactly what’s going on.

Q. I have a 1yr old male 38 lb Labradoodle and my gf just brought a month old kitten home. Can they interact? If not, for how long?
ANSWER : A. Interactions whenever a new pet is brought into the house should start off slow, then can be increased in time. The best steps when introducing a new cat is to allow your cat or kitten to have a room in the house all to him or herself. Allow your dog to sniff under the door to get used to the kitten’s scent, and even show your dog articles such as bedding the cat has slept on. After a few days, an introduction with your dog on leash, or a barrier such as a gate where both pets can look at each other but not see each other is best. This will allow each to get used to seeing the other without the ability to jump, bite or scratch the other. Once the two are used to this, then a face to face interaction can begin. If at any time a fight or scuffle breaks out, separate the two pets and try again at a later time. The amount of time this introduction takes can vary depending on how the two react to each other.

Until your kitten is older, or you are sure both are fine together, do not leave the two pets together unattended. Even a well-meaning and playful dog can accidentally break a leg of a kitten or worse without meaning to! A safe room for your kitten to be in while you are away, or a barrier to allow your kitten to escape to safety if needed will help until both are big enough to play alone safely.

Read Full Q/A … : Dogs and Jealousy

Q. 5 Yr old female cat change in behavior last 2 mos: hides, sleeps all the time, meows when touched, decrease appetite; last 1-2 wks wobbley.
ANSWER : A. While I think neurologic disease is certainly a concern based on what you’re describing, and should be ruled out with a good neuro exam (full examination of spinal reflexes and cranial nerves), a cat that sleeps all the time and is wobbly could have many things going on. What you’re describing sounds like generalized weakness to me, and that could be caused by heart disease, liver disease, kidney disease, anemia (lots of causes to this) or metabolic/hormonal conditions like diabetes. Often cats “look” neurologic when in fact they’re just really weak.

However, as far as specific neurologic conditions that might cause what you’re seeing, chronic ear infections or a polyp in the inner or middle ear can affect the vestibular nerve and affect balance, some drugs if used long term (metronidazole) can cause it as well. Other things include intervertebral disk disease (slipped disk), cancer in the spinal cord, thiamine deficiency (not a problem if your cat eats a commercially-prepared diet) and feline infectious peritonitis.

Unfortunately the only way to start figuring out what’s going on is likely with lab work (complete blood count, chemistry panel, and urinalysis) and x-rays for starters (likely of the spine). And as I said above a good neuro exam is critical to starting to figure out whether it’s a neuro problem or not. Your vet will possibly recommend other tests based on the initial results. If you’d like to consult further about exactly what’s going on with your cat select the “consult” button.