Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Many dogs have genetic sensitivities to Ivermectin that cause them to have serious reactions to even normal doses of this drug. For this reason it is only available in the U.S. By prescription and should only be used under the specific instructions of a veterinarian. Also, demodex can be very difficult to treat, and often requires repeated treatments until it resolves. In addition dogs can have secondary bacterial skin infections that require treatment with antibiotics in order to get the skin completely clear.

I’d also mention that demodex in young puppies, if it’s confined to a small area and not generalized, typically resolves on its own or with topical therapy. Consult your vet to see if treatment is even necessary for what your puppy has.

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However, ivermectin is not approved for use in treating dogs with mange, so its use to treat mite infestations in dogs is off-label. Ivermectin is a very strong drug that can cause severe side effects, including death if it is not administered properly.
Ivermectin – This is an oral medication that can be used to treat cases of demodectic mange in dogs. It may take several weeks or months before you see improvement in your dog`s skin condition when using this treatment alone. Due to the potential side effects of ivermectin, other therapies are often used first.
Ivermectin is given monthly for heartworm prevention, daily or every other day for demodectic mange treatment, and every week or couple of weeks for most mites.
Demodectic mange typically affects puppies, but it can also affect adult and senior dogs for non-genetic reasons.
Ivermectin should not be used in dogs younger than 6 weeks of age or in dogs without a current negative heartworm test. Some breeds of dogs (e.g., collies, sheepdogs, and collie- or sheepdog-cross breeds) are more sensitive to ivermectin than others.
Ivermectin can be administered as a tablet, chewable, topical liquid or paste, or an injection (this option must be done by a qualified veterinarian). While ivermectin can be given with or without food, if your dog gets sick afterward, your vet may advise that you give the medicine with a treat or food.
It can take weeks to months for demodectic mange to resolve depending on whether it is a localized or generalized infection and whether there are any secondary infections or underlying illnesses. Every dog will react differently to medications, so there is no exact timeline for resolution.
Life cycle, survival of Demodex

The typical Demodex life cycle is usually 2 to 3 weeks.

In this case a single oral dose of 200 μg/kg ivermectin effectively led to substantial clinical improvement within 1 month. Repeated skin scrapings remained negative for Demodex mites.
Whilst a single injection of ivermectin at 200–400 µg/kg was reportedly effective at eliminating mange infections in some studies [9, 23, 24], it is recommended that animals receive two to three treatments, 14 days apart, in order to kill S. scabiei larvae that emerge from the relatively acaricide-resistant ova [36].
Oftentimes, puppies develop mild, localized forms of mange that will resolve themselves over time as the immune system strengthens. However, if the case of mange is more severe, the veterinarian may prescribe an anti-parasitic medication or an Amitraz dip to help rid the body of the infestation of parasitic mites.
Mite eradication and control: Topical applications of compounds to kill the mites, such as selamectin and imidacloprid-moxidectin formulations, over a period of several weeks have been shown to be effective. Oral treatments are also sometimes used.
Given at the proper doses and under the supervision of a veterinarian, ivermectin is safe for most dogs and is very effective in treating and preventing a number of parasites. However, a dog with the mutation who ingests the drug can have a severe, life-threatening reaction called ivermectin toxicity.
Therefore, these products are considered safe for most dogs if used at the manufacturer`s recommended dose. This includes pregnant and breeding dogs; however, ivermectin is not recommended for use in puppies under 6 weeks old.
The safe use of ivermectin in adults and older children (aged 5 years and above) has been demonstrated in many studies, particularly in data provided by the Onchocerciasis Control Program.
Ivermectin is approved for use in dogs and cats for the prevention of dirofilariasis at oral doses of 0.006 and 0.024 mg/kg, respectively, once a month. Most dogs tolerate oral ivermectin dosages up to 2.5 mg/kg before clinical signs of toxicity occur.
Most patients with ivermectin toxicosis respond well to supportive care and return to normal within 48 to 72 hours. Resolution may be more rapid in patients treated with ILE therapy. This expert answer was provided by Jennifer L. Garcia, DVM, DACVIM, Sugar Land Veterinary Specialists, Houston, Texas.
The most common treatment of Demodex infestations is metronidazole. Topical metronidazole administered in combination with azelaic acid and oral doxycycline is effective for treating moderate to severe rosacea, which is another cutaneous disease associated with Demodex infestation.
Using ivermectin or milbemycin to help clear mange

The approved treatments for mange (demodex) are sulfurated lime or amitraz, but when they are not effective, veterinarians may recommend using high doses of the prescription medications, such as Heartgard Plus Chewables (ivermectin).

For this condition, it may likely take about 14 days to see a significant decrease in itchiness and as long as 3 months for complete healing. Please note with sarcoptic mange, itchiness often worsens for the first few days. This is believed to be due to an immune response to the dying mites.
Amitraz (Mitaban, zoetisus.com) is a monoamine oxidase inhibitor approved by the FDA for treatment of generalized demodicosis in dogs older than 4 months of age. There is good evidence to recommend weekly amitraz rinses for the treatment of canine demodicosis.
Demodex mite will only become a pathogenic organism when there is an abnormal increase in the number of Demodex mite density. This situation happens when the equilibrium between Demodex mites, skin microenvironment and human immunity system changes.
With proper care, your dog should be able to live a full and healthy life. Most, if not all of the fur should grow back as well. Scar tissue doesn`t develop often, but the rest of the dog`s body should be covered in fur by the time the dog has been fully treated.
Let me be extra clear on this: D canis and D cati, the species of mange mites found on dogs and cats, respectively, do not infect humans. In humans, demodex is contracted and spread by either direct contact with other infected humans or with dust containing the eggs of these mites.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. I have a 6 week old puppy with demodex mange EHST is the protocol for using ivermectin with this age puppy
ANSWER : A. Many dogs have genetic sensitivities to Ivermectin that cause them to have serious reactions to even normal doses of this drug. For this reason it is only available in the U.S. By prescription and should only be used under the specific instructions of a veterinarian. Also, demodex can be very difficult to treat, and often requires repeated treatments until it resolves. In addition dogs can have secondary bacterial skin infections that require treatment with antibiotics in order to get the skin completely clear.

I’d also mention that demodex in young puppies, if it’s confined to a small area and not generalized, typically resolves on its own or with topical therapy. Consult your vet to see if treatment is even necessary for what your puppy has.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. I just got a female Pug she is only 4 weeks old due to someone stole he mom while she was outside. I am giving puppy replacement milk please any advi?
ANSWER : A. Oh what a sad story. It is good that you are feeding a puppy replacement milk, follow the instructions on the package for amounts at corresponding age. Keep an eye on its weight too preferably daily and if it isn’t putting on weight or seems unwell have it checked by your vet. You can start introducing a puppy food in the next week or so and by 8 weeks it should be totally weaned onto puppy food. It will need vet check soon and start it’s vaccines at 6-8 weeks depending on the vaccine your vet uses.

Q. have a boerboel pup it got its first vaccine when it was about 6 wks old I havnt taken it for the 2nd one (15 days due) my pup looks fine is this bad
ANSWER : A. The pup should be seen by a vet for an exam and to continue the vaccine protocol. Puppies require multiple vaccines since maternal antibodies can block or negate the positive effects. Typically, vaccines are started around 7-8 weeks of age and repeated every 4 weeks until 16 weeks of age. One vaccine at 6 weeks of age is likely insufficient to provide protection leaving your pup at risk of serious infection.

Q. My puppy is 7 wks old and is covered in fleas. I don’t know what is safe to use on her. She is a Chihuahua and couldn’t weigh over 2lbs.
ANSWER : A. Consult with your vet about getting a dose of the oral medication Capstar. It’s only available by prescription, but it’s fantastic for removing adult fleas immediately – as fast as 15 minutes after ingestion. They just jump off – it’s quite remarkable. It can be used in puppies as young as 4 weeks as long as they’re 2 pounds or more.

You’ll still need a topical product to treat for the eggs that are left behind, however most of those are not labeled for use in puppies under 8 weeks of age. Talk to your vet about other possibilities, such as bathing or using a flea comb to remove eggs.

Q. I have 8 week old mini Poodles, I wanted to start them out on grain free and to use Innova grain free Natures Table, is this okay?
ANSWER : A. If the food is formulated for puppies, then it should be find to give. There should be an AAFCO statement that states “for growth” or “for all stages of life” to indicate that it is OK to feed puppies during growth. If your puppies are currently on another food, be sure to gradually switch them over a period of about a week to prevent digestive upset. (Starting with a few days of 25new/75 old, then 50/50, then 75/new/25 old before finally all new food) If your puppies are starting on solid food, then moistening larger kibbles can help make it easier for them to eat.

Read Full Q/A … : Dog Feeding Tips

Q. What solid food should I start 4 week old Pit Bull puppies on?
ANSWER : A. A puppy food designed for large breed puppies can help with rapidly growing bones and joints and can be given in a wet form easily to puppies learning to eat solids. You can also provide a dry kibble for them to try and should moisten it with water or some formula to make it easier for the puppies to eat and digest. As the puppies grow and their teeth come in, they will begin to eat and explore more of the solid food on their own.

Mom should also be on a Puppy formula while nursing her puppies as it will provide extra nutrients to both her and babies while they are in a very rapid stage of growth!