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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It’s often difficult to tell whether lumps, if what you’re talking about is actually inside the abdomen, are normal or not. A vet is trained to “palpate” or feel the abdomen and discern the individual organs, and whether they feel abnormal or not. There are many structures in there, from kidneys to the liver to lymph node. It takes quite a bit of training to know what a “normal” abdomen feels like.

If you’re talking about a lump you’re feeling under the skin, this could be something benign or malignant. Hopefully it’s nothing serious, but it’s best to get it checked out. And you should be aware that a ravenous appetite can be the sign of some hormonal diseases, although I’ve also known a lot of Beagles (which is sounds like is half of what makes up your dog) who were ravenous eaters, so he may be prone to overeating. Your vet can also determine if he’s overweight and give you diet and exercise tips for him.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

The tumor may appear as a small nodule, a reddish colored skin plaque, or as a papule – small and blister like in appearance, but differentiated by its lack of fluid.
Lipomas are common but benign fatty tumors that grow in the layer just beneath the skin. These tumors most frequently occur in the trunk, armpit and groin areas, but they can also grow internally. It is not uncommon for elderly dogs to develop multiple lipomas, which feel like soft, moveable lumps under the skin.
Lipomas: these fatty tumors appear as soft, round lumps of flesh beneath the skin. They`re made up entirely of fat cells and are always benign, or non-cancerous. They`re usually found in older dogs and dogs who are overweight. Larger breeds are more prone to them, although they can be found in small breeds as well.
Ganglion cysts are usually oval or round and may be soft or firm. Cysts at the base of the finger on the palm side are typically very firm, pea-sized nodules that are tender to applied pressure, such as when gripping. Light will often pass through these lumps (trans- illumination), and this can assist in the diagnosis.
One of the best ways to identify a potentially cancerous lump is to evaluate how that tumor feels when touched. Compared to the soft, fatty characteristics of a lipoma, a cancerous lump will be harder and firm to the touch, appearing as a hard immovable lump on your dog.
Sebaceous cysts: These cysts arise from the sebaceous glands of dogs. They`re filled with gross fatty material and they`re sometimes easily expressed, pimple-like. Most don`t get bigger than the size of a pea and they can get to feeling quite firm over time as the material within starts to dry and harden.
In dogs, the most common type of malignant skin cancer is a mast cell tumor. These tumors are superficial lumps that can be painful. They often swell, frequently bleed and then scab over, only to bleed again a few days later. They should not be squeezed by the owner, as squeezing can make them swell even more.
Mast cell tumors are quite serious when identified in dogs. If untreated they can cause anaphylactic shock or if they progress into a more aggressive form they can metastasize and ultimately lead to death.
Dog Cyst vs Tumor: How Do I Tell The Difference? Cysts are fluid-filled sacs under the skin that are usually easy to move around, while tumors are typically more solid. A cyst also may drain a white, yellow, or green discharge.
They can appear suddenly or slowly and may go away on their own. If they go away, they may come back for no reason. Exercise or using the joint where the ganglion cyst has formed more often may cause it to get bigger over time. Resting the joint may help it get smaller.
Skin Cysts

Cysts can appear anywhere on your body and may look and feel like a small, hard pea. The most common causes of cyst formation include clogged oil glands, infections, and a growth that develops around a foreign body such as an earring or navel ring.

Tumors are usually small lumps or bumps, but they also can occur as hairless, discolored patches, rashes, or nonhealing ulcers. Because skin tumors are so diverse, identifying them should be left to a veterinarian. Tumors may be benign or malignant (cancerous).
It depends on how aggressive or advanced the particular cancer is. By the time it`s detected, some dogs will live weeks to months, while others will live for years. Lymphoma patients, for instance, can live several years.
Unusual lumps and bumps. These growths could appear anywhere, so be sure to examine your entire pet regularly during petting sessions or as part of your dog`s grooming routine. Sores or open wounds that don`t heal. Weight loss or loss of appetite.
They may grow quickly, over the course of a few weeks. More commonly they grow slowly over months or years. In advanced cases, the skin overlying the tumor can ulcerate or break open. This leaves dogs susceptible to pain and infection.
Though lipomas are not dangerous, many people opt to have the growths removed for cosmetic reasons. Surgical excision is the only cure for lipomas, and the tumors will not go away without treatment.
Do lipomas go away in dogs? Lipomas can shrink with weight loss, but they do not go away entirely on their own. Surgery is not usually needed, but it is often effective in removing them. However, they may return in another area.
Of submitted samples, 20% to 40% are reported to be malignant. The most common malignant skin tumors in dogs are mast cell tumors, soft tissue sarcomas, and squamous cell carcinomas. The most common benign canine skin and subcutaneous benign tumors include lipomas, histiocytomas, and perianal gland adenomas.
Some common causes include fat, tumors (benign and malignantVery virulent or infectious.), cysts, infection (abscess), allergic reactions and swelling from injury or hernia. A hernia occurs when one tissue or organ protrudes through another into an abnormal place on the body, often causing a lump or bump.
Contact Your Vet

If you`ve found a lump or bump on your pet, give us a call right away to make an appointment. Because the difference between a benign mass and something more serious isn`t always obvious, your veterinarian needs to take a look.

Unless you`re sure about the cause of a lump or bump, bring your dog in for an exam. If you see fast growth, redness, swelling, pus, an opening, or if the dog is in pain, make that appointment even sooner.
Histiocytoma: This type of tumor develops rapidly and is raised and ulcerated. It is considered a benign tumor. Again mostly affecting young dogs this type of mass can regress and go away on its own without treatment. It may take months to go away and can be itchy, so sometimes owners opt to have the mass removed.
Lipomas are characterized as small, hemispherical lumps that can be felt just under your dog`s skin. The lump will likely feel somewhat soft and you will be able to move it a little, although it`s important to keep in mind that firmer, stationary lipomas are also fairly common.
Tumor removal for dogs can cost anywhere from hundreds of dollars to tens of thousands of dollars, says Dr. Gary Richter, D.V.M., founder of Ultimate Pet Nutrition and owner of Holistic Veterinary Care in Oakland.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. I have a Peagle who is 3 years old. He eats everything in sight. I have noticed about a week ago that he has a lump in his lower abdomen. He is overwe
ANSWER : A. It’s often difficult to tell whether lumps, if what you’re talking about is actually inside the abdomen, are normal or not. A vet is trained to “palpate” or feel the abdomen and discern the individual organs, and whether they feel abnormal or not. There are many structures in there, from kidneys to the liver to lymph node. It takes quite a bit of training to know what a “normal” abdomen feels like.

If you’re talking about a lump you’re feeling under the skin, this could be something benign or malignant. Hopefully it’s nothing serious, but it’s best to get it checked out. And you should be aware that a ravenous appetite can be the sign of some hormonal diseases, although I’ve also known a lot of Beagles (which is sounds like is half of what makes up your dog) who were ravenous eaters, so he may be prone to overeating. Your vet can also determine if he’s overweight and give you diet and exercise tips for him.

Q. Why does my dog eat grass?
ANSWER : A. As another user mentioned, dogs can eat grass when they want to vomit. Sometimes, when a dog has an upset tummy, they will eat grass. If you notice your dog eating grass frantically, you can assume vomiting will shortly follow. Grass does not digest and pass normally. If your dog eats too much grass, it can cause serious issues with pooping. Your dogs poop can end up all tangled inside of her, and it can need veterinary assistance to remove it. The same goes for celery, so avoid feeding celery to your dog.

The other day my boyfriend accidentally left the laundry room door open where we were keeping the trash that was filled with cooked chicken bones. She ate one of the chicken bones lightning fast. We had to induce vomiting by feeding her some hydrogen peroxide. After we had fed her the peroxide, she immediately began frantically eating grass because her tummy was upset.

If there is something lacking in your dogs diet, it could be that your dog is eating grass to make up for it. I am sure that my dogs diet is extremely well balanced (I do not only feed her an air-dried raw food-type diet (Ziwipeak), but a wide variety of safe, healthy foods), so when she eats grass, I know that it is because she has an upset tummy.

That is why I think it is important making sure your dog has a very well balanced diet. If your dog is on a low quality kibble, your dog may be trying to let you know by eating grass (or eating poop).

Q. My 3 month puppy eats his own poop and is also biting what can I do to prevent this
ANSWER : A. When it comes to poop eating, you want to consider a few things. First off, what is his diet like? Maybe something is lacking in his diet that is causing him to want to eat his own poop. This is the most common reason why dogs eat THEIR OWN poop. Try a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Ziwipeak, Orijen.. and try feeding three meals per day, instead of the more common two meals per day. Remember to gradually switch his kibble. Add a little bit of the new kibble and reduce the old kibble very slowly.. little by little every couple of days until the bowl is mostly new kibble! You should also be cleaning up his poops IMMEDIATELY after he does them.. I mean like, you have a bag in your hand, and you are low enough to scoop it up RIGHT when he finished so he doesn’t have a chance to eat his poop.

When it comes to nipping there are a few things you can do. First, you should yelp as soon as the teeth touch your skin, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore the puppy until he is ignoring you. Once he is off doing his own thing, swoop down and calmly reward him by playing with him WITH A TOY so he doesn’t nip your hands. Whenever you pet him, or interact with him, you should always have a toy on-hand so you can give it to him. This toy should be a soft braided rope toy that YOU own. This means, your puppy is never allowed to have this toy on the floor, and your pup can never “win” tug games with this toy. This is YOUR toy that disappears when you’re finished playing, and reappears when you want to play. If you keep this up, in a weeks time, your puppy will be so excited to see that toy, that as soon as you bring it out, he stops nipping you because he wants to play with the toy. Another thing you can do is have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/soft toys/squeaky toys/etc. After one week, Bag#1 disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys as Bag#1, and it only stays out for one week. This keeps the toys feeling like new to your pup!

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. Does an indoor cat need to be vaccinated every year?
ANSWER : A. In practice, I recommend a feline combo vaccine every year, but will generally start administering every 3 years once they have had their kitten vaccines and 2 additional yearly vaccines. Rabies, is required yearly by law, and if kept up to date can be good for up to three years also. Based on the age of your cat I would give a yearly feline combo and rabies, and then boost the combo again next year.

Q. My 2 months old rottweiler puppy isn’t eating properly. Shes only eating shredded or minced chicken but adding any thing means she won’t eat.
ANSWER : A. This is not a nutritionally adequate diet for your puppy. She needs to be eating a good quality puppy food. Put the proper amount in her bowl and put it down without any fuss. Leave it for fifteen minutes. After that, if she has not eaten, pick it up–again without fuss–and do not give her anything else to eat until her next scheduled mealtime, not even treats. When she is due to eat again, repeat the process. This may take quite a few days to resolve, as she will try to hold out for the chicken. Do not give in! Remember that you are not starving her. The food is there, but she is choosing not to eat. When she realizes that this is all she is going to get, she will begin to eat and your problem will be solved.

Q. My 9 month old Maltese-Shih eats his own feces. Is there anything i can give him to get him to stop?
ANSWER : A. Coprophagia (or eating stool) is very common in young dogs. Luckily, most dogs will outgrow this behavior as they age. There are several theories as to why dogs do this which range from mimicking the mother dog’s behavior of cleaning the den, nutrient deficiency, boredom or just plain enjoyment of it.

If your dog is eating his own, removing the feces as soon as he deposits them is best in preventing them from being eaten. Keeping your dog on a leash while he potties can also help to catch any stool before he finds it. If he is eating other stool as well, sweeping the area prior to letting him out to go potty can help you identify and remove any left-behind stool.

There is also a product called For-bid that is available to make stool distasteful to pets. This product is sprinkled over every meal for a period of a week. When your dog attempts to eat the stool formed from this product, it becomes distasteful and discourages him from doing so. Most dogs will stop after a week of use, but some may need a few reminders from time to time to completely stop the behavior.

Q. My 10 year old west highland Terrier had a lump confirmed as fibrous four years ago and no harm. It is getting bigger. Is this normal?
ANSWER : A. I always recommend to remove any lump because even if they are benign they can grow massively causing pain or they can change behavior at any point and be malignant even with fatty benign lumps. Please don’t let the lumps grow, could be too late.

Read Full Q/A … : Pet 27 by reec – issuu