Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is more than likely that it will be a trip to your vet. You can try cleaning them several times a day with cool boiled water on cotton pad. If it continues or gets worse then it is a trip to the vet I’m afraid.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

A sticky, tenacious eye discharge could point to canine dry eye, a failure to make enough tears. Symptoms can also include mucus and inflammation. Dry eye may be the result of distemper, injury, a knock in the head near a tear-producing gland, or the dog`s immune system attacking the tear gland tissue.
The primary cause of such a symptom is wind, dust, dirt, and pollen allergies. Mold spores and mites are also responsible. A few dogs could develop several benign tumors on eyelids that rub the eye`s surface. The result is discomfort accompanied by discharge for the dog.
Use a Warm Washcloth

An easy and useful approach is to get a clean cloth, soak it in clean warm water, and hold the cloth over your dog`s eyes for about thirty seconds. This softens eye boogers, allowing you to gently wipe them away and clean around your dog`s eyes.

What Pets are More Prone to Eye Infections? Pets with really long hair about the eyes are prone to eye infections since the hair and anything on the hair can get into the eyes. Dogs with large bulging eyes, like pugs or Pekingese, are also prone to eye infections because of the size of their eyes.
If your dog has colored green eye discharge, yellow eye discharge or another colored eye discharge, schedule a vet appointment immediately. Other signs of a potential problem include squinting, a red-looking eye, or if your dog is rubbing or pawing at his eye.
If your dog`s eyes are weeping, watering more than usual, or you notice yellow, green or white coloured discharge, they may have an eye infection. Other signs of eye infections in dogs include pawing at their eye, blinking more than usual, swelling, redness and squinting.
A poor quality, highly processed, high carbohydrate diet is one of the most common causes of crusty, runny, or dull eyes. Commercial foods can also cause an allergic reaction, leaving your dog with red runny eyes.
Pink eye is notoriously contagious in humans, but luckily, Graham says most cases in dogs are not contagious to people or other dogs. However, as always, it`s best to consult your veterinarian about your dog`s specific case to determine how careful you should be until their conjunctivitis clears up.
Clean Eyes and Ears are Essential to Your Dog`s Health

Check for redness or other signs of irritation. Healthy eyes are bright and clear, and the white of the eye is pure white. You can help keep them that way by gently wiping away discharge in the corners with a cotton ball or soft washcloth moistened with warm water.

Is conjunctivitis contagious for humans and other pets? Non-infectious conjunctivitis (e.g., from an injury or allergies) is not contagious. However, if the conjunctivitis is the result of a virus or bacterial infection, it has the potential to be transmitted from one dog to another.
While non-infectious conjunctivitis is not a serious condition in and of itself, it won`t clear up on its own without treatment, and it may point to a more serious health problem that needs to be addressed. Additionally, if left untreated, your dog could sustain a permanent eye injury or even vision loss.
Another remedy is saline solution, which is a mix of salt and sterile water. This solution can be used as an eye wash to clear away discharge and cleanse the affected area. Lastly, apple cider vinegar, a go-to household ingredient, with antibacterial and antifungal properties can help combat the infection.
Certain breeds of dogs are known for having a `normally` increased eye discharge. Rottweilers and English Bulldogs have more goopy eye discharge and small breed dogs such as Toy Poodles and Chihuahuas often have a brownish or clear discharge.
Redness of the eye or surrounding the eye. Swelling around eye. Watery discharge or tearing. Thick, smelly discharge.
Vaseline- Once your pet`s tears have been cleaned, apply a small amount of Vaseline to the area just under the eye to prevent the tears from sitting in the same area and staining.
When food allergies occur, you may notice a dog`s eyes become more watery. You can see water pool up underneath their eyes. You may notice dry and crusted tear marks near the corners of the eyes as well. Use a warm wash cloth to gently wipe away the dried tear areas.
In rare cases, a dog can give a human pink eye. Likewise, if you are suffering from pink eye, it`s a possibility for you to transfer the infection to your beloved friend.
The clinical signs of conjunctivitis are discharge from the eyes (cloudy, yellow, or greenish), squinting or excessive blinking, and redness or swelling around the eyes. Conjunctivitis often involves both eyes, but only one eye may be affected in certain conditions.
Most dogs will make a full recovery from conjunctivitis however it`s important to note that early treatment is essential for avoiding complications due to conjunctivitis. In rare cases dogs can be left with scarring on the eye and/or vision problems due to this condition.
The medically correct term for dog eye gunk is discharge. Clear to whitish-grey eye gunk with a watery consistency is normal in most dogs. You may notice some dust in them as well.
Pinkeye that`s caused by bacteria can spread to others as soon as symptoms appear and for as long as there`s discharge from the eye — or until 24 hours after antibiotics are started. Conjunctivitis that`s caused by a virus is generally contagious before symptoms appear and can remain so as long as the symptoms last.
Important. If you think that your dog has conjunctivitis, even if symptoms are mild, consult your vet as soon as possible. If the condition is not treated quickly, it can cause permanent damage.
Salt water, or saline, is one of the most effective home remedies for eye infections. Saline is similar to teardrops, which is your eye`s way of naturally cleansing itself. Salt also has antimicrobial properties. Because of this, it only stands to reason that saline can treat eye infections effectively.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. I have a young pug/Chihuahua that in the past 2 days developed goopy eyes followed today by goopy, milky eyes. I live hrs from a vet.
ANSWER : A. It is more than likely that it will be a trip to your vet. You can try cleaning them several times a day with cool boiled water on cotton pad. If it continues or gets worse then it is a trip to the vet I’m afraid.

Q. Young pug pup (6-8 wks) has goopy eye yesterday and goopy eye that looks milky today. Live hrs from vet. Rinsed with saline today. Other ideas?
ANSWER : A. Do that several times a day. You will need to go to your vet just about now anyway for vaccines, flea and worm treatment so ask at the same time about the eye. It may need antibiotic drops.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. One eye is more red than the other. Last night he was pawing at it,today, he isn’t. Should I bring him to the vet?
ANSWER : A. Sounds possible that he had some irritation to the eye that is at least not itchy anymore. You can do either, having it checked now to confirm mild irritation, potentially due to debris or a topical irritant to the eye; or you can flush the eye with sterile saline eye wash (over the counter) using care not to poke or prod the eye and see if the irritation goes away on its own within the next 24 hrs. It has shown improvement already it appears, however if it is not cleared up and your pet seems irritated by it AT ALL, then it should be looked at by a vet and tested for a possible corneal scratch or ulcer. These can cause redness of the eye, eye discharge and pawing at the face. They are usually treated by prescription only topical eye antibiotic ointment and generally do very well after treatment.

Read Full Q/A … : Eye Problems in Cats

Q. Weak, discharge from eyes, swelling on right eye, does not want to open eyes. What is wrong?
ANSWER : A. If the discharge from the eye is green or yellow in color, it can indicate a secondary infection. Swollen eyes can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies to infections, to injury to the eye itself or surrounding areas.

It is best to have your pet’s eye examined by your local vet. They will most likely wish to place a stain in the eye that can check for damage such as cuts or scratches. An ointment can then be given to help reduce inflammation, pain and take care of infection.

Until you can get to the vet, be sure to not let your pet scratch or paw at their eye as this can make things worse. You can also use a warm wet washcloth to gently remove any debris and allow the eye to open some, providing relief. However, if symptoms worsen, or the swelling travels to the face, head or neck, it may indicate a serious allergic reaction which should be treated immediately.

Q. My dog got into a fight with a cat. I think the cat scratch her eye. I clean it out with water. I have gentak can I put that in there?
ANSWER : A. It is best NOT to place anything in the eye unless specifically instructed to do so by your vet as it can cause more damage to the eye. As cat scratches and bites can easily become infected and the eye is a very sensitive area, it is best to schedule a veterinary appointment as soon as possible to have the eye examined. Your vet can place a fluorescent stain in the eye to check the extent of the damage and can then give you a pet-safe medication to place in it as needed to help it heal. Until you can get to the vet, it is best to keep the eye clean of debris and discharge with a warm wet washcloth, and to prevent your dog from scratching or clawing at the eye with the use of an Elizabethan (cone) collar.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. What can be given to dogs to stop the brown draining around dogs eyes? I was told tetracycline would work.
Thanks
ANSWER : A. Eye leakage is normal in some breeds of dogs, especially those that are more “bug-eyed” types. This eye leakage is just normal tears coming from the eye which can stain lighter colored coats. Unless there is an infection it does not need to be treated with antibiotics. Signs of infection usually include drainage that is thick or goopy and is yellow or greenish in color. Dogs with infections may also want to keep the eye closed, or may paw and scratch at it.

For plain tear-staining. Tear-stain wipes can be used around the eyes to remove the stain and bring the coat back to natural color. If infection is suspected, it is best to have your vet take a look at the eye prior to placing any medications in it.

Q. I was told by my vet that my dogs cherry eye was caused by something hitting his eye when he was poking around under a bush. I was told surgery needed
ANSWER : A. Prolapsed gland of the eyelid refers to a pink mass protruding from the animal’s eyelid; it is also called a “cherry eye.” Normally, the gland is anchored by an attachment made up of fibrous material. The most common sign of “cherry eye” is an oval mass protruding from the dogs’s third eyelid. It can occur in one or both eyes, and may be accompanied by swelling and irritation. He may have acquired it by getting an injury to his eye but this isn’t the case sometimes. Sometimes there is a weakness in the fibrous attachment.

The veterinarian will review the mass in the dog’s third eyelid and determine if there is an underlying cause for the condition. The diagnosis of the prolapsed gland could be scrolled or everted cartilage in the third eyelid, abnormal cells in the third eye, or a prolapse of fat in the dog’s eye.

Treatment often includes surgical replacement of the gland in the dog’s eye, or removal of the entire gland if the condition is severe. Conversely, if medications are recommended, they are typically topical anti-inflammatory drugs that are effective in reducing swelling.