Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It depends on the food that you are feeding. Manufacturers generally put the recommended daily amounts on the outside of the package or on their website. Remember that these amounts are usually for a 24 hours period and so you need to divide it over 3 (or however many you ae doing) meals a day. Often these amounts are over exaggerated too so don’t be too alarmed if your puppy doesn’t eat all of it.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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As mentioned above, 8 week old puppies should eat anywhere from 3-4 times per day. They can stick with that same schedule until they are about 3 months old.
For `large breed` puppies, the advice is for under 3 months feed them 4 times each day, for 3 to 6 months old, feed them 3 times each day, and at 6 months and older you can feed them just twice each day.
40 – 45 pound Lab, feed: 205 – 230 grams per day. 50 – 55 pound Lab, feed: 240 – 265 grams per day. 60 – 65 pound Lab, feed: 270 – 300 grams per day. 70 – 75 pound Lab, feed: 300 – 335 grams per day.
For the first few months of a puppy`s life, they will need small meals of food throughout the day as they transition from their mother`s milk to solid food. Starting around four months, puppies can begin eating about three times a day, and after that, puppies will quickly graduate to twice-a-day feedings.
Your puppy schedule at 8 weeks old will require that you take them outside at least every hour at first. This is on top of taking them to the area you`ve allocated for their poop and pee first thing after they wake up, during and after they`ve played, and after they`ve eaten or drunk water.
A new study found Labrador retrievers are more likely than other breeds to beg for treats and generally be obsessed with food. That`s because they have a specific gene mutation that sets them apart from the rest. It`s the first of its kind that has been directly associated with canine obesity.
Labs sleep a lot, and although all new dog owners expect puppies to nap frequently, they are often surprised by how much adult dogs sleep during the day too. Young puppies can sleep for up to 20 hours a day, but grownup pups aren`t that far behind with an average of around 12 hours of shut eye.
According to the AKC, puppies at 7-8 weeks should get 18-20 hours of sleep per night! Most puppies are weaned from their mother and brought to a new home at this age. This schedule persists until about 20 weeks of age. As the dogs get older, sleep time is reduced to 13-15 hours.
Generally, young puppies need about one-half cup of water every two hours. You`ll want to monitor your puppy to make sure he`s drinking enough . . . and not too much. Older puppies that have already been weaned generally need between one half ounce and one ounce of water per pound of body weight per day.
Compared to other breeds, Labs are moderate barkers. Whereas some breeds have excessive barking habits, Labs are a little more reserved. However, they`re not like breeds that only bark to alert you of danger, so you`ll likely find your dog barking periodically throughout the day for various reasons.
Puppies and adult dogs do not require to be bathed very often. Just once every three to four weeks should be enough. You may need to bathe your puppy often if it regularly gets itself dirty by rolling around in mud and grass.
Give your dog plenty of opportunities to go to the toilet in an appropriate place. Take them out when they wake up, after every meal, after playtime, before bed, before you leave them and when you come back, and then every 45 minutes.
The answer is you should not be leaving your 8-week-old puppy alone for an extended period. This is the part of their life where they have just been weaned and need regular feedings and potty breaks. It is recommended to wait at least until they are 3 months old before they are left alone.
Most puppies do best in a crate with a soft and suitable bed or bedding tucked inside. Crates keep your little guy corralled and away from temptations and dangers while you get some shut-eye too.
But in all honesty, there`s no `right time` for a puppy to go to sleep, as long as it`s the same every night. While this may be the case, do note that your puppy will need, on average, around 8-10 hours of sleep per night.
Other frequently flatulent breeds include mastiffs, German shepherd dogs, and Labrador retrievers. Although you may be unable to outsmart mother nature, you can support these gassy guys and gals by ensuring they eat healthy, high-quality food and exercise regularly.
In general, puppies poop a lot. They are small, with an intestinal tract that is still developing. Food is processed very quickly, and sometimes it`s not as thoroughly digested as it could be. In general, the younger the dog, the faster that the food will move through their digestive tract.
Recently, psychologists performed a study on dog behavior and learned without a doubt that dogs do get jealous. Whether it`s jealousy as humans experience it, or an offshoot of deeply ingrained dog behavior like resource guarding or redirected excitement, dogs do feel envy.
Most Labradors love being around people and even other dogs – meeting new friends is great! So, taking your dog with you when go to the pet store, park, or even over a friend`s house can make your Lab very happy. They would much rather come with you than stay at home.
Dogs likely feel comforted when they can sleep close to their favorite humans, and similarly you might benefit from being close to your dog at night. A crate or dog bed somewhere in your bedroom is probably the perfect spot for your dog to sleep.
If he seems drowsy, encourage him to nap in his safe place: a crate, a dog bed, or a quiet place in the house where he can nap undisturbed. It may take time for him to get the idea, but eventually he`ll recognize that spot as the place for sleep. Follow a schedule.
In general, an 8-week old puppy will need to sleep 18 to 22 hours a day. Don`t forget; it`s totally common for your new puppy to cry at night but with some time, patience and attention, you`ll be able to ease this problem reasonably quickly.
Don`t crate your 8 week old puppy for more than 2 hours during the day. As she gets older you can increase the amount of time she spends in the crate. Associate as many positive experiences with your puppy and the crate as possible.
No Food or Water Before Bed

If they go to sleep on a full stomach and bladder, it won`t be long before they`re whining to go out. Don`t feed your puppy in the three hours before bedtime, and do your best to withhold water for the last hour or so. This should elongate the time he sleeps through the night.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. How much should I feed my cat?
ANSWER : A. How much a cat should eat depends on many variables including his activity level, metabolic rate and the food you are offering. Use the feeding guide on the cat food label as a starting point. These instructions usually read something like, “for cats weighing 5 lbs, feed between 1/2 and 3/4 cup per day; for cat’s weighing 10 lbs, feed between 3/4 and 1 cup per day; and for cats weighing 15 lbs, feed between 1 cup and 1 1/2 cups per day”.

Use your cat’s body condition to fine tune the amount you offer. For example, if he is overweight offer an amount on the low end of the recommended range and reevaluate in a few weeks to a month. Your veterinarian can also help you determine how much of a particular food you should be offering.

Q. I’m fostering some now motherless 5 week old Pitbull puppies. There are 5 of them. How much do I feed them? I give them blue buffalo puppy food by wa
ANSWER : A. It should say on the Blue Buffalo on the back under, “puppies” or some sort of age chart. Make sure it’s puppy food.. puppies need extra protein and nutrients. http://bluebuffalo.com/product-finder/dog/?facets=Puppy,Dog_DryFood#

http://www.bullytree.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Feeding-Chart-Blue-Buffalo.gif – On the back of a puppy-food bag from Blue Buffalo it says underneath 3-5 months, “3 to 20 lbs: feed 1/3 – 1 1/4 cups per day” and “21 to 50 lbs: feed 1 1/2 – 3 cups per day.” Make sure you are breaking that up into at least three meals. Let’s say you decide to feed them 1 1/2 cups per day each, then, you should measure that out, and set it aside. Throughout the day, you should offer at least three mealtimes with that set-aside amount. You want to start with the least amount, and then if they seem hungry (licking the floors, begging you constantly for food, whining/crying) feed them a little more until you get it right. Do not overfeed, and try to avoid underfeeding a well.

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. My 8mo. puppy eats feces. Wedont scorn him for pottymishaps. He hides feces in his bed.I feed him blue buffalo 2 per day. How do I stop this?
ANSWER : A. A lot of dogs do this, and sometimes it is just because feces tastes good.. sometimes it is due to something lacking in their diet.. but a lot of the time, it’s just fun and tasty. The only way to handle this situation is management. You should be cleaning up your two dogs poops immediately when they happen. Scoop them up, throw them into the woods, or into a can. You cannot give your pup access to the poops.

You could also try adding things to your pups diet. Things like canned pumpkin for dogs (not the pie filling you find in the grocery store, that has way too much sugar in it). Or you could feed your dog raw chews like marrow bones, or beef tendons. You’ll have to add things to his diet in order to find out what is missing from it. If you allow him to continue eating poop, even if there is something lacking in his diet, he will continue eating poop when you’ve solved his diet issue because it will become a LEARNED behavior. This means he will continue eating poop because he learned he CAN eat poop. You could also try feeding him three meals per day. Feed him the same amount of food, but break it up into three feedings per day. This could help him feel a bit more full throughout the day.

Clean up your yard, and clean up after your pups immediately when they eliminate outdoors. Do not scold him, there is no need.. it isn’t his fault.

Read Full Q/A … : R

Q. I have an 8 week old chocolate Lab and wondered how much I should feed him each day.
ANSWER : A. It depends on the food that you are feeding. Manufacturers generally put the recommended daily amounts on the outside of the package or on their website. Remember that these amounts are usually for a 24 hours period and so you need to divide it over 3 (or however many you ae doing) meals a day. Often these amounts are over exaggerated too so don’t be too alarmed if your puppy doesn’t eat all of it.

Q. We just adopted a Lab puppy who seems to be hungry all the time. She is usually awake by 4:30 am. Wondering on when and how much to feed her?
ANSWER : A. It depends on the food you feed her. Read the back of the bag of food, whatever it says on the back under “amount for puppy”, decrease that by a very small amount. Often kibble bags encourage overeating to sell more product.

You should be feeding the puppy at three set times throughout the day. A nice and early breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Make sure you aren’t feeding too close to bedtime. Give the puppy an hour after eating before bed in case she has to eliminate outdoors again before bed.

I’m wondering if maybe she’s just waking up at 4:30am to be taken outside to eliminate. Puppies can typically only hold their bladders 1 hour per month of age, plus 1.. and that’s typically pushing it until after 6mo of age. Have you tried just bringing the puppy outdoors, and then luring her back into her crate with a high value treat? See if she’ll go back to sleep.

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. My pet eats too much. I need to know when and how much to feed him. Any advice?
ANSWER : A. If you feed your pet a commercial food, most food bags have a feeding guideline on the side to help you know how much to give. This is a good baseline and is usually based on your pet’s weight or age. Once you start with this amount, you can adjust the amount of food given as needed – if your pet seems to gobble his food and is losing weight or is more active, then increasing the amount is good. If your pet picks at his food or appears to be putting on the pounds, reducing the amount can help. The amount to give is usually best fed broken up into several smaller meals throughout the day rather than one big meal. For most adult animals, feeding once in the morning and once at night is enough. Smaller dogs or young animals may need a third meal mid-day as well. Switching out treats for healthier options may also help prevent overeating or weight gain. If you feel your pet cannot safely lose or gain weight on his own, then making an appointment with your vet can help!