this ?

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. There is a therapy with melatonine given by mouth on a daily basis. If it is first time when symptoms have occured there is a chance of self recovery and that signs will not reoccur in the future.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

This condition is purely cosmetic; therefore, no treatment is necessary. If you would like to treat this condition for cosmetic reasons however, melatonin is often used for treatment. Your veterinarian can help you determine an appropriate dose, after ruling out other possible causes for your dog`s hair loss.
The 5 most common causes of bald spots on dogs include allergies, Cushing`s disease, pressure sores, genetics, and infection or infestation.
There is also a wide range of prescription medications available to treat alopecia from reoccurring. These include antibiotics, antihistamines, antifungals, and steroids. Your veterinarian will determine the best treatment for your pet.
Antibiotics & Antifungals

If the bald spots on the dog`s body are due to bacterial infections, then the best course of treatment is either topical or oral antibiotics. But in the case of hair loss caused by ringworm fungus or fungal infections, antifungal medication would be the appropriate solution.

Seasonal flank alopecia is a cosmetic disorder and does not affect the health or quality of life of the dog.
Is Alopecia Contagious? Hair loss itself is not contagious. But when alopecia is caused by parasites like fleas or demodex mange, or bacterial or fungal infections, these things may be transmitted to other animals or people.
There is no cure for alopecia areata. If you have a few, small patches of hair loss on your head, it`s likely your hair will grow back within a few months. Your doctor may not prescribe treatment in those cases. For larger areas of hair loss, your doctor may prescribe steroid injections under your scalp.
Anxiety can trigger a number of health problems in humans, including hair loss. This is also true for canines. When your dog is nervous on a car ride or is fearful at the veterinarian`s office, you may have noticed that they shed a lot.
Bathe every 4-6 weeks

If your dog is prone to yeast, alopecia x, black skin disease, hot spots or other skin conditions, you`ll want to continue with our shampoos and conditioners every 6-8 weeks throughout their life.

Depending on the cause, coconut oil might help manage Alopecia. We recommend giving CocoTherapy coconut oil to your dog, at maximum oral tolerance: The typical dose is 1 TSP/10 lb body weight. You can divide the dose between his AM/PM meals.
Symptoms of Demodectic Mange

In localized cases, it shows up as patches of hair loss and red, scaling skin. In generalized cases, the entire body may be covered with redness, infections, scaling, swelling, and crusts. Often the dog loses most, if not all, hair.

There is currently no cure for alopecia areata, although there are some forms of treatment that can be suggested by doctors to help hair re-grow more quickly. The most common form of alopecia areata treatment is the use of corticosteroids, powerful anti-inflammatory drugs that can suppress the immune system.
Diet: Your dog`s diet may be the cause, or at least a contributor, to hair loss. Your veterinarian may recommend a change in diet to include foods to help your dog`s skin and hair. Change in seasons: Certain breeds are susceptible to seasonal alopecia, which is hair loss that occurs in the autumn months.
If food does not have adequate protein or fat, the dog may develop areas of hair loss or the hair may lose color. The haircoat may become dry, dull, and brittle.
Alopecia in dogs

Like in humans, hair loss in dogs may be caused by stress, which can come through an unhealthy living environment in the home, a genetic reaction or this ailment can be the result of an autoimmune disease.

Pet Hair Can Make You Sick Via Parasites

They come in a wide variety of types, from tapeworms to scabies and fleas. And many of them can travel on pet hair, right to your nose. If they ever burrow their way into your body, you`ll be facing a nightmare.

People with alopecia areata typically have smooth, round patches of complete hair loss that develop over a period of a few weeks, followed in most cases by regrowth over several months (picture 1). However, alopecia areata may persist for several years and sometimes hair never regrows.
One of the most common vitamin deficiencies that can cause hair loss in dogs is a lack of biotin. Biotin is a water soluble vitamin that helps to keep the skin and coat healthy. Symptoms of biotin deficiency include dry skin, dull coat, and hair loss.
Ringworm can show in a variety of ways in dogs, most commonly as patches of hair loss with a crusty coating, or (rarely) as asymptomatic. Ringworm patches in some dogs resemble a grey, scaly patch, while in others they resemble a scarlet lesion.
Over-grooming – Over grooming (grooming too much) often causes alopecia, saliva staining and red skin. It can be due to stress, pain or irritated skin. Seasonal alopecia – Some dogs develop harmless patches of alopecia in the autumn that don`t regrow for 6-12 months.
A lick granuloma (also known as acral lick dermatitis) is a skin condition that occurs due to distress in your dog. This distress can be flared up by stress, anxiety, or boredom. When your dog is stressed, they will start to lick a patch of their skin over and over until it becomes raw.
It is possible that emotional stress or an illness can bring on alopecia areata in people who are at risk, but in most cases, there is no obvious trigger.
How Long does Hair Loss Last? In half of patients with alopecia areata, individual episodes of hair loss last less than one year, and hair grows back without treatment. These patients may experience recurrent episodes of hair loss that spontaneously regrow or respond quickly to treatments.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. I have been told my Bulldog has seasonal alopecia ? He gets a patch on either side of his stomach about 10cm wide. Is there a treatment for this ?
ANSWER : A. There is a therapy with melatonine given by mouth on a daily basis. If it is first time when symptoms have occured there is a chance of self recovery and that signs will not reoccur in the future.

Q. My dog has ate a sock. Is it going to hurt her? If so what can I do
ANSWER : A. If your dog has swallowed a sock the possibility that it will hurt her is unfortunately pretty good. Socks can very easily obstruct the GI tract, and either get stuck trying to get out of the stomach or once they get out of the stomach they’ll get stuck in the intestines. The best and safest way to get them out is with an endoscope, which can be done if they’re still in the stomach. Otherwise surgery will have to be done to remove it.

Sometimes socks will come up when we make a dog vomit, but it doesn’t always happen.

Q. My older rottweiler is continously whining and staring at my shiba inu female, and not listening to any commands even though he’s very well trained.
ANSWER : A. If they are both intact, she may be in season or putting off pheromones that he thinks means she’s in season and he’s far too busy hoping she’s receptive to pay much attention to commands. If she is intact, confine her (or him) in a separate room until she is out of season. If you don’t plan on breeding her, I suggest getting her spayed and this will not only curtail this behavior, it will help protect her from getting serious uterine infections, getting pregnant accidentally and greatly decrease her chances of getting breast cancer. If she is spayed, she may have a remnant of reproductive tissue that is producing enough hormones to pique your male dog’s interest. In this case, get her in to see your vet and have her hormone levels tested.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. My dogs were given Hartz ultrguard seven days ago. Can they be given frontline now because they still have fleas
ANSWER : A. In flea control, you get what you pay for. I would wait one more week before applying another product.

For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. ALL ABOUT EYE CONTACT.. MY FEMALE ESS, UPON GETTING EYE CONTACT FROM PEOPLE SHE CRIES, WHINES & WANTS TO JUMP FOR ALL THE ATTENTION SHE CAN GET..
ANSWER : A. Somewhere along the line she has learned that this gets her something she wants, attention, food, something, and now we have to teach her that behaving and being quiet gets her what she wants. Don’t reward her whining and bouncing by giving her attention. Instead, ignore her, going about your business until she quiets and settles down. THEN give her a treat, petting, and praise. She needs to learn that being the well-behaved dog is what will get her the attention she craves. Teaching her obedience will help her learn how to behave in various situations and to look to you for how to behave. And, above all, make sure your dog is getting sufficient physical and mental exercise every day. A tired dog is a good, happy dog and one who is less likely to bark and misbehave from boredom or frustration. Depending on breed, age, and health, your dog may require several long walks as well as a good game of chasing the ball and playing with some interactive toys. Kong toys filled with peanut butter are an excellent way to reward her for being quiet and keep her that way for a good while as she plays with her toy and gets the peanut butter out.

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.