down..

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. It is possible it could be play behavior but without seeing it in person, hard to say. Is the male kitten neutered? You may want to consider doing so. Also, try re-introducing the kittens slowly by creating a safe space for the new kitten behind a closed door in a room. Keep her there for at least a week so she is protected but your male is still able to smell her. After a week or 2, you can then graduate to using a baby gate so they can then not only smell each other but safely see each other as well. If that is going okay, after another few days you can bring the gate down. Also, be sure to have feeding bowls in separate locations and at least 2 litter boxes.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

It is probably some mix of jealousy and territorial stress. The new arrival has it very wound up, so it is constantly on edge. If things remain atressed you might talk to your vet about kitty anxiety meds for a little while, just till he can calm down And get used to all the new stuff.
In kittens, most aggression is caused by fear or curiosity. In older cats, there may be other reasons for cat aggression and attacks, such as redirected aggression, or when a cat lashes out at its owner because it senses something is wrong.
He may feel threatened, challenged or fearful. He may feel territorial to certain areas of the home. His aggression towards the female (and you) may be actually coming from outside – perhaps he can see and smell other cats or a dog nearby.
Play Aggression

These kittens have no other playmates, and so may go from sweet lap snuggles to biting in seconds. Adopting a pair of kittens allows them “legal” outlets to wear each other out, until they outgrow the behavior by about 9 to 12 months of age.

Signs of aggression include dilated pupils, ears flattened backward on the head, tail held erect with hairs raised, and an arched back.
Signs of conflict between cats can be open or silent. Signs of open conflict are easy to recognize; the cats may stalk each other, hiss, and turn sideways with legs straight and hair standing on end up to make themselves look larger. If neither backs down, the displays may increase to swatting, wrestling, and biting.
Don`t worry too much about the gender of the cats involved. Age and temperament are the most important factors. Adult cats will usually accept a new kitten much more easily than they will accept a new adult cat. Cats are territorial, and your cat may resent an adult feline intruder.
It takes most cats eight to 12 months to develop a friendship with a new cat. Although some cats certainly become close friends, others never do. Many cats who don`t become buddies learn to avoid each other, but some cats fight when introduced and continue to do so until one of the cats must be re-homed.
Act Small and Approach Slowly

You can help ease this fear by showing them you are not a threat. Never make a cat feel like it is cornered. A cornered cat is likely to lash out, even if it has never done so in the past. Be sure you approach them slowly and safely, and leave them an escape plan.

The term “love bite” is somewhat of a misnomer. “When cats bite in this context, it`s not a sign of affection, but rather a signal that the cat is done with the interaction. If the petting continues despite the cat`s efforts to signal that he or she is done with being petted, the cat may escalate to a bite,” says Dr.
If you have a young cat at home and want a second, consider adopting one kitten of the opposite sex, as same-sex cats are much more prone to fight each other for dominance. Your resident cat will still be young enough to recall having fun with her littermates, and the new kitten will be more than happy to oblige.
Jealousy over the presence of another cat is very common. All cats have different personalities, and some will be made insecure and display jealousy more easily than others. It is important to watch your cat and observe their cues and triggers.
This playful biting and scratching behavior tends to peak around nine months of age and often continues until they`re about one and a half years old. Of course, all cats are individuals. Some kitties don`t have that interest in aggressive behavior, and others can play aggressively well into their older years.
Although play is usually more common in kittens, it may persist through adulthood, especially in cats under 2 years of age that have no other feline companions.
The good news is that most kittens calm down with age. Cats develop much quicker than their hooman families so you can expect your kitten to slow down at around 9-14 months as they advance into adulthood.
If your cats` bodies are relaxed or their ears are pointed forward, they`re likely just playing. If your cats flatten their ears, hold their ears back, or puff up their fur or tails, this is a sign that they`re fighting, not playing.
A cat who has not been socialized properly may be timid or aggressive, and they might display a range of behavior problems, from scratching your furniture to boycotting the litterbox.
Boredom may contribute to destructive behavior, so providing dedicated play time and acceptable toys for cats to play with is important. A variety of feline-friendly toys are available, but remember that time spent actively playing with your cat is best, for both of you.
Our team of vets agree that using water bottles to discipline cats isn`t the best course of action. According to Dr. Dwight Alleyne, “Spraying cats with water can create a negative association with humans. As a result, they may become more anxious or even aggressive over time.”
Caution when introducing cats

You may see them swatting or hissing when the other cat tries to go to the food bowl. Watch for signs one cat is avoiding areas. If you think she`s being bullied make sure she has her own space and things like bed, litter box, food bowl. Never punish either cat if they show aggression.

Adding an unfamiliar cat to an existing cat`s home can be stressful for both animals, but there are some steps you can take to help them integrate into their new home and socialize. The key is to slowly integrate new smells, give them time alone to explore their new environment and provide them with their own space.
Cats can be loveable, friendly pets — but sometimes they might not like you very much. If your cat has a lowered or puffed-up tail, it could mean they are afraid or uncomfortable. Cats might also bite you or hiss at you if they aren`t your biggest fan.
The average time frame is a few weeks but it could take months for the cats to learn to tolerate each other. Maintain a separate litter box and feeding area for the new cat in his room for a few weeks. It is highly recommended to have multiple resources for multiple cats.
Cats that get along, and tend to feel that they are part of a same social group, will: Raise and hold their tails straight up when they see each other. Rub against each other, when walking along or passing by. Play gentle, “fake fighting” games together and will share their toys.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. I recently added a new 2 month old female kitten to my house and my male 5 month the old kitten has turned aggressive and chases the kitten down..
ANSWER : A. It is possible it could be play behavior but without seeing it in person, hard to say. Is the male kitten neutered? You may want to consider doing so. Also, try re-introducing the kittens slowly by creating a safe space for the new kitten behind a closed door in a room. Keep her there for at least a week so she is protected but your male is still able to smell her. After a week or 2, you can then graduate to using a baby gate so they can then not only smell each other but safely see each other as well. If that is going okay, after another few days you can bring the gate down. Also, be sure to have feeding bowls in separate locations and at least 2 litter boxes.

Read Full Q/A … : Ragdoll Cats

Q. My cat will not eat the renal food my veterinarian recommended, can I feed a grocery store food?
ANSWER : A. Your veterinarian recommended a therapeutic kidney diet because it has ingredients that will help slow the progression of your cat’s conditions, especially phosphorus and lower protein levels. Many of the non-prescription or grocery store foods generally have high levels of phosphorus and would not be ideal for your cat.

To help your cat accept the new food It is important to do a transition. There are two reasons to do a transition:

1) Occasionally a pet will have a GI upset when switched to a new diet,

2) A pet will accept a new food better when a transition is done to allow the pet to get use to the new texture and flavor.

There is more of a chance with a hydrolyzed protein or different (high or low) fiber level food to cause a GI upset. Transition recommendation:

1) Recommend ¾ old diet – ¼ new diet

2) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

3) ½ old diet – ½ new diet

4) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

5) ¼ old diet – ¾ new diet

6) Do this for a few days; if no GI upset, go to the next step

7) End with 100% of the new food.

Sometimes a transition should be longer, especially for cats. Use the same recommendation, but instead of a few days, recommend doing each step for a week or more. If you cat is still not interested in the new diet you can research other non-prescription diets focusing on the labels for appropriate levels of phosphorus and protein.

Also, home cooking may be an option but make sure to provide adequate nutrients. A good website to consult is balanceit.com. This website helps you to create well balanced home cooked recipes and offers supplements to add into the diet.

Q. I have a 1yr old male 38 lb Labradoodle and my gf just brought a month old kitten home. Can they interact? If not, for how long?
ANSWER : A. Interactions whenever a new pet is brought into the house should start off slow, then can be increased in time. The best steps when introducing a new cat is to allow your cat or kitten to have a room in the house all to him or herself. Allow your dog to sniff under the door to get used to the kitten’s scent, and even show your dog articles such as bedding the cat has slept on. After a few days, an introduction with your dog on leash, or a barrier such as a gate where both pets can look at each other but not see each other is best. This will allow each to get used to seeing the other without the ability to jump, bite or scratch the other. Once the two are used to this, then a face to face interaction can begin. If at any time a fight or scuffle breaks out, separate the two pets and try again at a later time. The amount of time this introduction takes can vary depending on how the two react to each other.

Until your kitten is older, or you are sure both are fine together, do not leave the two pets together unattended. Even a well-meaning and playful dog can accidentally break a leg of a kitten or worse without meaning to! A safe room for your kitten to be in while you are away, or a barrier to allow your kitten to escape to safety if needed will help until both are big enough to play alone safely.

Read Full Q/A … : Dogs and Jealousy

Q. Approx 8 years old, had her for 4 years, last couple months has been peeing in/out of her box on furniture,blankets,etc. Never had this behavior.
ANSWER : A. Most of the time when a cat is peeing on your personal belongings such as your bed or piles of clothing/blankets the cat is telling you it is upset about something. Try to think of what could have happened that brought change to the cat’s life. Such as a new baby, new house, new pet, change in routine. New food, new liter, ect. I would try to address what was the change if possible. Make sure to keep the box clean and try adding more boxes. 1 box per cat and 1 box per house story. (2 story house 2 cats = 2-4 boxes).

Q. I have a 9 week old kitten. At what age do they start spraying? We have a 12 yr old cat that has sprayed a door, I think. Could it be the kitten?
ANSWER : A. It is not unusual for an established house cat to start acting out once there is a change in his environment. In this case, the new kitten could be a stressor for the older cat as he tries to get used to the new change of an added house member. To answer your question, cats generally do not start spraying until the are around 5-6 months old.

Q. I just started a new job w.long hours. Would my 3 yr old Siamese enjoy a kitten companion? If so, m/f? I was thinking of a shelter kitten.
ANSWER : A. Generally adult cats can take to younger kittens a bit easier than another adult cat. You may want to get the opposite sex from what your Siamese is. Also, slowly integrate the new kitten into the household giving your current cat a chance to get used to her/him. Start off by having new kitten behind a door for a few days or even a week. From there you can put up a baby gate so they can see each other but still have somewhat of a safety barrier and after that, you can let the gate down to see how they do. You may want to feed in 2 separate areas and you definitely want at least 2 litter boxes. A shelter kitten rescue would be a great idea!

Q. Why is my 5 month old kitten biting and removing the 1 week old kittens from their box?
ANSWER : A. You should have one litter box for each cat ( or group of cats, that live together in good terms like kittens in the same age) plus one extra litter box in your home. Boxes should be also localised in different places in the house like in different rooms or corners of one room. In your case 5 month cat can “think” that all litter boxes are his, so he removes rivals from them.

Q. My unfixed grown male dog is slobbering and trying to mount my new male puppy. What’s that about?
ANSWER : A. Mounting behavior can be both a sexual thing in dogs, or a behavioral one. If both dogs are male, it may be that your older dog is trying to establish that he is the boss of the house by trying to mount your younger one. Stopping the behavior is best to prevent any fights from breaking out. Both female and male dogs can do this to each other, and spay/neuter status does not usually play any factor if behaviorally related.

If your younger dog is female, or not spayed, and is about 6-7 months of age, it may be that she is coming into her first heat and your male is very interested in her. Dogs should not be bred during their first heat, and if you do not wish to have puppies in the future, one or both dogs should be fixed.