forearms.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. Is not common but sometimes ear mites if not treated can be spread to the nearby skin. Other causes for skin problems involving face, neck, chin and legs can be allergies especially food allergies. Try to go to your vets for a proper diagnostic and treatment.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Signs your cat may have ear mites

shaking their head or scratching their ears excessively. having red and inflamed ears caused by extra wax and irritation. producing a black, dry ear discharge which can sometimes let off a bad smell.

What do dog ear mites look like? Ear mites in dogs typically look like tiny, moving dots in the ear canal, but are so tiny that you may not be able to spot them at all. It takes a vet with an otoscope or microscope to properly spot an infestation.
Feline ear mites on the insides of the ears will look dirty, usually with a dark brown or reddish-brown debris. Sometimes a black crust forms, as well. This crust can clog the ear canal over time. Your veterinarian can easily diagnose feline ear mites.
While ear mites are incredibly contagious between cats and dogs, there is no risk to humans.
Cats that aren`t suffering an ear mite infection have a lighter brown earwax color that does not smell. The darkly colored earwax caused by an ear mite infection will often have ear discharge resembling coffee grounds.
These parasites are NOT CONTAGIOUS to people, but they are HIGHLY CONTAGIOUS in pets. Ear mites are spread mostly by direct contact with another pet and/or animal that has ear mites.
Ear mites (otodectes cynotis mites) are commonly found in cats and are part of the arachnid family. This extremely contagious external parasite makes its home on the surface of your cat`s ear canal, and sometimes on their skin.
Ear mites are tiny mites, barely visible to the human eye, that live on the surface of ear canal skin in dogs (and cats). They are barely visible to the human eye. An infestation produces brownish ear wax, similar in appearance to coffee grounds.
Most cats have healthy, clean ears and never need to have their ears cleaned. However, it is recommended to clean your cat`s ears if you notice discharge or an odor when examining the ear. Your veterinarian can help you decide how often your cat`s ears should be cleaned.
“It could be wax, debris, ear mites, or discharge from an ear infection.” In fact, if your kitty has allergies or chronic ear infections, your veterinarian may recommend that you clean your cat`s ears on a regular basis. Your cat is frequently scratching at his ears.
Ear mites are transferred from animal to animal through contact. If your cat is venturing outdoors they may be making friends in the neighbourhood and getting ear mites from them while they socialize. Now don`t worry you can cuddle up with you cat or dog and not get ear mites from them.
Ear mites are pesky creatures that can be found on animals as well as humans on rare occasion. Spotted within Jazmine`s ear canal, mites may also live on the skin or even underneath it to feed off dead skin tissue or human secretions like ear wax and skin oils.
In a healthy cat, the ears will have very little ear wax and the discharge will be a light brownish color. The healthy discharge will have no smell and be accompanied by a pink, clean inner ear canal.
Unfortunately you will always need to treat ear mites in your cat because they will not go away on their own. If treating ear mites in cats is delayed for too long you run the risk of chronic ear infections.
If your pet has ear mites, these mites can travel to your bedding and furniture and then attach themselves to you — a human host. Keep in mind you don`t have to have an animal of your own to get ear mites. You can develop an infection if you come in close contact with anyone`s pet who has ear mites.
Ear mites can spread to cat`s fur and his bedding. Therefore you should carefully vacuum your house, and particularly the places where they eat and sleep. Wash their bedding, toys and anything else that they touch with hot water to kill ear mites and to avoid future outbreaks.
In severe cases, ear mites can lead to inflammation of the outer ear as well as the external ear canal. The cat`s ears may appear red and inflamed, and you may notice pus or a dark material resembling coffee grounds in your cat`s ear canal. Ear mites can also lead to torn eardrums.
Ear mites are tiny, spider-like creatures that are normally contracted from the outdoor environment that your feline friend comes into contact with. This can include wooded or grassy areas, or animal shelters or veterinary offices with poor hygiene.
Ear mites are almost microscopically tiny, “about the size of a pinhead,” says Dr. Miller. But, he notes, it`s possible to see their rapidly moving little bodies with the naked eye.
Ear mites are tiny arthropods (think of them as little insects) that make their homes in or near the ear canals of cats, dogs, and other domesticated animals. They appear as small white dots on the ears of pets and are difficult to recognize with the naked eye alone.
Only clean your cat`s ears if a small to moderate amount of debris or discharge can be seen in the pinna and the ear drum is intact. Clean the ears only as needed, such as once every 2-3 months. Over-cleaning can lead to irritation. Healthy cats generally do not need routine ear cleaning.
To do this, soak a clean cotton ball in alcohol and wipe off the tip of the bottle. Do not use alcohol on your cat`s ear. Massage the base of your cat`s ear for 20 to 30 seconds to help distribute the solution throughout their ear canal. Hold their ear flap, and use a cotton ball or gauze to wipe away any debris.
Ear mites are tiny skin parasites that cause intensely itchy ears, a build-up of earwax and ear infections. Ear mites can affect cats of any age but are most common in kittens. They can also affect other animals such as dogs and ferrets.
Black Or Brown Ear Secretions

If your cat is scratching their ear, you may see some black or brown debris fly out. You may also notice a tiny bit seeping out of their ear. If you look inside of their ear, you may see black or brown coffee-like secretions. All of this indicates that mites are present.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. One of my pet’s ears seems very irritated. What I can use to clean it with?
ANSWER : A. Ear Irritation can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies, ear infections or even mites. Dirty ears can also cause irritation and problems. Knowing the type of problem is best for figuring out how to treat it.

For plain dirty ears that do not have any odor, redness or leakage of discharge/debris, a simple over the counter canine ear cleaner can be used. Gently soak some cotton balls or a washcloth with the cleaner, and then use these to wipe out the flap of the ear and opening to the ear. Do NOT use Q-tips as these can become stuck or lodged in the curve of the ear canal and may cause injury to the ear drum.

If the ear is bright red or itchy without any dirt or debris in it, it may indicate an allergy. Sometimes an allergy medication can help provide relief in this situation. Your vet can give you the correct dosages of an over the counter allergy medication to use, or may recommend one specifically for dogs.

For infections and mites, changes to the ear such as bad smell or lots of debris and discharge, flecks of black or brown debris, or scabs and sores in the ear may be present. In these cases, it is best to have your vet take a sample of the ear debris to test for mites or infection. Your vet can then give you an ointment that is placed and left in the ear between ear cleanings. Most vets will then recommend cleaning the ears twice daily and then leaving in the ointment after for a period of ten days.

Ear mites ARE contagious to other pets, so if your dog does have them, it is best to treat any other pets in the house at the same time to prevent the mites from spreading around continuously.

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. I have two problems with my 16 yrs old dog: he’s constipated and has a ear ache. What can I use to relieve these?
ANSWER : A. Constipation is a common problem in dogs that can be due to a number of things. However it is a good idea to make sure the constipation is not actually diarrhea, as some dogs can strain after a bowel movement, making it look like such. If constipation is present, adding a little pumpkin puree or plain yogurt to the diet can help make digestion easier and make stools easier to pass. However if symptoms do not resolve after a few days, it is best to speak with your vet.

For ear aches, it is best to have your vet examine the ear as many things including allergies, ear infections, mites and more can cause ear problems. If the ear is just dirty, then cleaning the ear gently with cotton balls or a clean washcloth and a dog ear cleaning solution can help. Do not use Q-tips as a dog’s ear has a 90-degree turn in it and placing Q-tips in the ear can cause damage to the canal or inner ear. However if the problem persists or cleaning does not help, it is best to seek care.

Q. I thought my cats had earmites because of their dirty ears, however, all but one of them have the exact same lesions on face, neck, chin and forearms.
ANSWER : A. Is not common but sometimes ear mites if not treated can be spread to the nearby skin. Other causes for skin problems involving face, neck, chin and legs can be allergies especially food allergies. Try to go to your vets for a proper diagnostic and treatment.

Read Full Q/A … : Veterinarians

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. Aggressive young cat attacking my other cat?
ANSWER : A. Aggression among cats can be a sign of stress, especially if one cat has just been introduced, or if the other cat is overly curious/friendly toward the scared one. The best first step is to make sure each cat has their own separate “spaces” where they can go to get away from harassment from the other cat. Up-high bedding, quiet rooms, etc can all help. Make sure each cat also has their own litter box and food/water bowls as cats often do not like to share and this can be a point of aggression between them. Lastly, placing pheromone diffusers or pheromone calming collars on one or both cats may help decrease stress and aggression through the use of cat calming pheromones. Fel-i-way is one of the most common brands.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.