Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I’m not sure what your question is. Are you concerned about possibly bringing an infection home to your cat? It is possible if she came in contact with contaminated clothing. If she continues to vomit, I would take her to see a vet.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

You may see roundworms in your cat`s feces or vomit. Your veterinarian can help you with roundworm prevention, examination, and treatment. Other kinds of worms that cats can get include heartworms, hookworms, and tapeworms.
Other frequently diagnosed causes of feline vomiting include the ingestion of such substances as the leaves of poisonous plants, spoiled cat food, various human medications, pieces of string or yarn, antifreeze, certain human foods (chocolate or onions, for example), or any number of objects that a cat might find lying …
Intestinal viral infections are highly contagious and are usually spread through contact with infected feces or saliva. The virus may be ingested or inhaled and in rare cases transmission can occur through contact with contaminated litter boxes, food dishes, bedding, or grooming equipment.
Kittens are more susceptible to disease than adult cats, but orphans are even more at risk for upper respiratory infections. Don`t treat her with over-the-counter medications, as many contain aspirin or acetaminophen, which are toxic to cats. As soon as you notice sniffles or sneezing, take your orphan to the vet.
Is Cat Vomit Dangerous To Humans? While somewhat disgusting, it is unlikely that you will get sick or be in danger by touching or accidentally ingesting (yuck) cat vomit. Touching and accidentally consuming cat feces is much more likely to be a problem. The only issues crop up when cats have been poisoned.
Dark, tarry or coffee ground-like bits in vomit can indicate partially digested blood, and that means a visit to the veterinarian. If cat vomit is yellow or pale green, that could be bile and indicate an underlying disease or condition. “It stains and is hard to get out of the carpet,” Ward says.
If your cat is sick once or twice but appears otherwise well, remove their food for a few hours, then feed small amounts of a highly digestible food such as chicken, or a prescription diet from your vet. Allow them constant access to a small amount of water. After 24 hours go back to your usual routine.
Key messages. Infectious diseases, such as gastroenteritis, can be spread from animals to humans. When visiting zoos, farms and other animal exhibits, care must be taken to prevent the spread of infection.
Rotavirus is a virus that affects the gastrointestinal tract. It can be transmitted from animals to humans and vice versa. Rotavirus infestation is a common cause of severe diarrhea in young animals. It can also affect older animals, but this is less common.
Common signs of a sick kitten include: lethargy, weakness, decreased or lack of appetite, less interest in playing, sleeping more, vomiting, diarrhea, weight loss, trouble walking, and less interest in their owners, companions, and toys. The very first sign many sick kittens show is not eating.
The most common sign of illness in some cats is hiding in a quiet, out-of-the-way place. Sick cats often lie quietly in a hunched position. They might neglect grooming. They may be purring, which cats do not only when they`re happy, but also when they`re sick or in pain.
Monitor her food and water intake, as both are vital to her overall health, especially while she is sick. Keep comfortable blankets or towels in her area for her to snuggle in to keep her warm; make sure they are washable and something you`re okay with her possibly having stomach upset on.
If cat litter boxes are not regularly cleaned, the urine and feces accumulate and ammonia fumes build up. Ammonia is a toxic gas made from a combination of nitrogen and hydrogen. Living in an atmosphere filled with these ammonia fumes can cause a great deal of respiratory discomfort and problems.
Pushing or throwing your cat in frustration can harm her, both physically and in spirit. Always handle your cat with gentle care, and your cat is more likely to respond to your wishes.
If your cat hasn`t been chronically vomiting, brown liquid vomit may be indicative of internal bleeding further down the gastrointestinal track. This could be the result of something like a foreign body ingestion or a large hairball impaction that is blocking the intestines and creating inflammation and trauma.
All cats are going to throw up every once in a while, but a common misconception is that vomiting is normal behavior for cats. If your cat is throwing up more than once a week, or even consistently every few weeks, you should see your vet. Frequent or repeated vomiting is not normal behavior for your cat.
When Can I Feed My Cat Again After They`ve Thrown Up? After waiting several hours, you can try to give your cat about 25% of what you would normally feed to see if they can keep it down. Then gradually increase the amount over the next 24 hours. If your cat starts vomiting again, you will need to seek veterinary help.
If your cat has an upset stomach that is causing them to have diarrhea or vomiting as a secondary symptom, they will probably drink more water to make up for the fluids lost during this time.
If a cat vomits frequently or is showing other signs of illness, such as lethargy, inappetence (a lack of appetite), drooling, hiding, diarrhea, or constipation, then the cat needs to be seen by a veterinarian,” Teller said.
When should you start giving kittens water? Kittens will generally begin to wean around three to four weeks of age, at which point it`s time to start giving them a little solid food. At the same time, you should provide them with fresh, clean drinking water in a shallow bowl.
In order to recover, your sick cat needs to have both food and water. When cats are ill they will often stop eating and drinking, therefore, it is important to monitor your cat`s food and water intake so that you know when intervention is necessary.
While living an indoor lifestyle is certainly safer overall than living outdoors, and indoor living contributes to a longer life expectancy, important infectious diseases can find indoor cats. Feline rhinotracheitis virus, feline calici virus, and feline panleukopenia virus make up the feline distemper complex.
It is extremely unlikely that you would pick up toxoplasmosis by petting your cat or being scratched or bitten by your cat, because the organism is not spread by the fur or saliva. You CAN, however, pick up toxoplasmosis by eating undercooked infected meat, particularly lamb and pork.
People who should avoid close contact with cats include: Very young children. Pregnant women. Immunocompromised people (such as those with HIV or undergoing cancer treatment).

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. i believe my cat is pregnant but showing signs of being in heat
ANSWER : A. Cats are induced ovulators, meaning they will continue to go into heat until they are bred, or spayed (reproductive organs removed). If your cat is showing signs of being in heat (excessive yowling, presenting her rear to you for inspection, attempting to get out or other cats hanging near your house) and you don’t want kittens, it is best to have her spayed. Most cats are also semi-seasonal in their heat cycle meaning they will more likely be in heat through Spring-Summer than in Fall-Winter.

Pregnancy in cats lasts about 60 days. Signs of pregnancy may include weight gain, increased appetite, nipples that become pronounced or “leak” and seeking nesting areas to deliver kittens. If you saw that your cat was in heat, or had her mated, you can use the date she was bred to determine when she may be due for kittens. Your local vet can help determine if she is indeed pregnant and can also take an X-ray to determine the number of kittens present if your cat is nearing her due date. Be sure to feed mom a kitten formula in the last few weeks of her pregnancy and during nursing as it will help provide extra beneficial nutrients for both mom and babies.

If you do not want kittens, some very early term pregnancies can be aborted with spaying, otherwise spaying mom is usually done when kittens are weaned from their mom.

Q. I have 6 cats, my 2 black, male, cats have small eruptions on the furry bridge area above & to the side of the nose. They dry and form crust scabs.
ANSWER : A. I do agree with the answer below that any time more than one animal in a household is affected with a skin condition we have to rule out contagious disease – even if not every animal in the house in infected. The changes you are describing to your cats’ noses definitely sound compatible with infectious diseases like ringworm and mites (mange). However, if your cats stay indoors and don’t have contact with cats outside of your other cats, and if none of your cats (not just the infected ones) came from a shelter recently it’s probably not something contagious.

I will add that I have seen non-affected cats that carry ringworm and pass it to other animals in the household, so if you have any new cats check for ringworm.

Once infectious causes have been ruled out you can think about strange things, like immune-mediated skin disease (lupus) and solar dermatitis. Diagnosing what exactly is causing the problem and how to treat it may require taking a biopsy from one or preferably both cats.

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. I work at an animal shelter and my vet tech thinks there is a bacteria spreading around. Cats throwing up. My kitten just threw up twice.
ANSWER : A. I’m not sure what your question is. Are you concerned about possibly bringing an infection home to your cat? It is possible if she came in contact with contaminated clothing. If she continues to vomit, I would take her to see a vet.

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. I have a cat with that virur (aids) could u tell me about her disposition and care
ANSWER : A. Thanks for your question.

Unfortunately the discussion about what you asked has no straightforward answers and can be quite complex.

First thing that I would double check, considering that your cat is very young, is whether she is really infected. It is important to remember that kittens born to FIV-infected queens will receive antibodies from the queen via the milk, and so will test positive early in life though they may not be infected. Kittens with a positive test result should always be retested when they are 5-6 months of age.

Many FIV infected cats are able to live happily with the virus for a long period of time, and indeed the virus will not necessarily ever cause clinical disease.

Different factors will influence the onset of disease in your cat including:

– The ”subtype” of FIV your cat is infected with,

– Her immune response

– The presence or absence of other infectious agents.

To maintain a good quality of life for your cat, I will give you these general guidelines, but you will then find certainly helpful to speak with your veterinarian for specific cases.

– Some antiviral medications used in human patients with HIV infection have also been shown to help some cats with FIV infection. Interferons may have anti-viral effects and modify immune responses. A recombinant feline interferon (feline interferon omega) is available in some countries. Down side is the cost usually.

– Keep your cat away from other cats and possible source of infections;

– Maintain good quality nutrition;

– Keep your cat indoor if possible regularly checked by your veterinarian;

– Keep your cat away from non-infected cats.

Q. We have two female cats who are sisters. One was just diagnosed with generalized lymphoma. Is there risk of being contageous? What kind of food
ANSWER : A. Lymphoma is a cancer and not a bacteria or virus, so it cannot be spread from cat to cat via contact. However, if your cats are related, they may both be genetically predisposed to getting the same type of cancer. Feline lymphoma can also sometimes be caused by the Feline Leukemia Virus (FeLV) or Feline Immunodeficiency Virus (FIV) which CAN be spread from cat to cat. The spread of these viruses is usually through bite wounds, saliva or fecal and urine matter, and the chances of spread among two amicable cats is lower, however testing both cats is always good.

As lymphoma can cause a decrease in appetite, sometimes the best food is one that will keep your cat on her normal eating routine so that she keeps her weight and energy up. Enticing her to eat by warming up wet foods, or even moistening and warming dry foods may encourage continued normal eating and may prevent weight loss from loss of appetite. A high-fat, high protein and low carbohydrate diet (such as a grain-free diet) may also help by providing a more calorie and nutrient dense meal so that every bite is beneficial.