ide. Help

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You will want to set her up with an expen that has a bed, a chew toy and her potty spot. I wouldn’t recommend pads alone, you’ll want to get a potty patch or a couple chunks of fake grass to put on top of the pads. This way there is less confusion between going inside/outside. When you can’t supervise put her in the expen. When you can take her out reward her when she goes outside with a yummy treat. You’ll continue to use the expen, gradually allowing her more freedom one room at a time, leaving the pen door open for her to use the potty. Don’t rush freedom to fast though.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If you`re wondering when can puppies go outside away from home, the American Veterinary Society of Animal Behavior (AVSAB) recommends that pet guardians begin taking puppies on walks and public outings as early as one week after their first round of vaccinations, at about seven weeks old.
Take your dog out into the yard as much as possible during those first few days. She should only be able to play after going to the bathroom. Shoot for about a half hour after she eats or drinks. Every time you see her urinate or defecate, say “Good Potty” Or “Good Doggy”.
Take your puppy outside frequently—at least every two hours—and immediately after they wake up, during and after playing, and after eating or drinking. Pick a bathroom spot outside, and always take your puppy (on a leash) to that spot.
Remember, dogs and especially puppies need to urinate often. As a guideline, new puppies up to 10 weeks old typically can`t hold their bladder for more than an hour. Dogs between 10 to 12 weeks old can usually hold it for around two hours.
For most, it will take between four to six months for your puppy to be fully reliable, but it will depend on their size, age and ability to learn. Some puppies can learn how to be toilet trained really quickly in only a few weeks, whereas for some dogs it may take longer and could be up to a year.
This will help your puppy learn to aim for a smaller target, making transitioning to going potty outside easier. Start by cutting the pad in half or using a smaller pad, and gradually reduce the size until your puppy is comfortable using a very small pad or no pad at all.
Are boy dogs easier to potty train? No, both males and female puppies are the same when it comes to potty-training. There is no difference in their gender. Some dogs are easier to potty-train than others, but this mostly comes down to size and breed.
One of the easiest ways to train a dog to go only in one spot is to train it to go on command. Take your dog on a leash to the spot you want it to use, and say the cue word. Keep the dog in that spot until it goes, then offer a reward. Only reward the dog when it goes in that particular spot.
Adult dogs that are one year or older should be able to hold their pee in for up to 6-8 hours. However, 8 hours is a bit of a stretch, and ideally, you should not expect your dog to hold their urine for longer than 6 hours.
Puppies don`t need a bath when younger than 8 weeks. Their small bodies are not quite ready to self-regulate body temperature yet. If they do need a clean, you can wipe your puppy down with a warm cloth. Once your puppy is older than 8 weeks, you can start bathing them in a sink.
First, we`ll determine how much your puppy sleeps at night and then distribute the remaining sleep time throughout the day. Typically, dogs between 7-16 weeks can sleep 6-8 hours, but they still need to take a potty break at night. So if your dog wakes up at night, it means it needs to pee.
Yes, dogs can pee in their sleep. There are a number of different conditions that can lead to urination during sleep. They can also have trouble “holding it” until they get outside to go potty, so it may appear that they peed while they were sleeping but they were actually awake and aware.
The instant you feel your puppy`s teeth touch you, give a high-pitched yelp. Then immediately walk away from him. Ignore him for 30 to 60 seconds. If your puppy follows you or continues to bite and nip at you, leave the room for 30 to 60 seconds.
Many will go two or three times a day on the regular, but if you`re wondering how often do puppies poop, it`s closer to five times a day. But if your dog is pooping more than that, don`t panic! As long as your dog`s stool is solid, of an even consistency, and doesn`t contain blood—that`s probably normal for them.
In general, the younger the dog, the faster that the food will move through their digestive tract. It is not uncommon for a puppy to defecate 5-6 times per day. Some will eliminate even more frequently. The good news is that the pace of pooping will slow down as the dog matures.
The foundation of training should be based on positive reinforcement. Positive reinforcement is the process of giving a dog (or person!) a reward to encourage the behavior you want, like getting a paycheck for going to work. The idea is not to bribe with the behavior but to train it using something your dog values.
Put your pads in easy reach of your puppy`s bed or crate at nighttime. Going to the toilet in the house, or their crate, can cause significant distress if they know it`s not what you want them to do, so ensure they have the option of a `safe` place to pee, and your puppy will sleep much better.
Citrus. The citrus smell is arguably the best dog repellent there is. You do not have to do a lot. Simply peel an orange or a lemon next to your dog and you will observe it leaving the spot immediately.
A Summary. Dogs have a strong sense of smell and they`re usually averse to the smell of vinegar, alcohol, fresh herbs, mothballs, citrus, and ammonia among others. Teach your dog not to pee on rugs and the furniture by spraying them with any of these smells.
The methodology of observing the dogs freely exploring the experimental area allowed us to determine the smells that were the most attractive to them (food, beaver clothing). Our study shows that dogs interacted more frequently with the scents of blueberries, blackberries, mint, rose, lavender, and linalol.
It is common for pet owners to allow a pad to be reused once or twice and this can actually assist with the potty training, but any used pad left for too long is going to become a source of odor.
Female dogs tend to be easier to housebreak, easier to train, and more connected with their owners—but in certain circumstances they can be more demanding of attention. Aggression can be a problem in any dog of any breed, however it is usually more apparent in non-neutered males.
Female dogs reach puberty and adult weight faster than males dogs, which may play into their ability to pick up training commands. “A dog`s individual temperament will be the number one component that determines the ease of training, but, in general, female puppies tend to be easier to train,” says Riley.
You should consider your household and the lifestyle that you and your dog will have. If you have lots of people in and out for gatherings or like to take your dog into public places, a female may be the best choice. If you have several dogs or intend to add to your canine family, a male may be a better fit.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. What is the best way to train your dog on a pee pad? He can go on the pee pad if I bring him to the pad if I don’t he makes an accident.
ANSWER : A. Train your dog using a positive reinforcement method. Since your dog will use the pad when you bring it to him, reward him immediately for urinating on the pad. First, teach your dog to associate the word “good” with a treat (or use a special device called a “clicker” in place of a verbal “good”). Then, say “good” or “click” when you dog urinates on the pee pad and reward him as soon as he finishes. Repeat this training over and over until your dog understands that peeing on the pad equals reward. Then, begin to move the pad away from your dog and bring him to the pad wherever it is. Again, reward when he goes on the pad. It is all about making it “fun” to pee on the pad (reward) and not fun to pee anywhere else (no reward). To learn more about “clicker training” and/or positive reinforcement training, I recommend purchasing a good book on training using positive reinforcement techniques. Or, I or another of the experts on this site, would be happy to consult with you to guide you through the steps and make this a positive experience for both you and your dog.

Q. I’m getting my 9 week puppy today and she’s a shorkie. I want to train her to be able to pee on pads when I can’t take her out but also outside. Help
ANSWER : A. You will want to set her up with an expen that has a bed, a chew toy and her potty spot. I wouldn’t recommend pads alone, you’ll want to get a potty patch or a couple chunks of fake grass to put on top of the pads. This way there is less confusion between going inside/outside. When you can’t supervise put her in the expen. When you can take her out reward her when she goes outside with a yummy treat. You’ll continue to use the expen, gradually allowing her more freedom one room at a time, leaving the pen door open for her to use the potty. Don’t rush freedom to fast though.

Q. How do I desensitize my dog to squirrels and stray cats in the neighborhood?
ANSWER : A. It depends on the goal that you have in mind. I am going to assume that you would prefer that your dog not chase squirrels or stray cats in the yard/street. In this case, your options include: (1) training your dog on a “Leave it ” cue using positive reinforcement methods, (2) training your dog not to pull on its leash when it sees a squirrel/stray cat, and (3) training your dog to perform a more desirable behavior when it sees a squirrel/cat.
Training your dog on a cued “leave it” command is useful because it will give you the ability to tell your dog to stay away from any number of undesirable objects on your command. Training your dog to perform a more desireable behavior when it sees a squirrel or cat will substitute a behavior you find acceptable (sitting, laying down, coming to the door, etc.) with a behavior you dislike. Your dog can still react, just in a positive way. If your dog pulls on the leash every time you see a squirrel/cat, training not to pull will make your walk safer and more pleasant.
The ideal training method to use with dogs, or any animal for that matter, is positive reinforcement training, particularly a method called “clicker- training.” The basic concept of positive reinforcement training is to pair a reward (reinforcement) with a behavior you want to increase in frequency. In other words, when your dog performs the behavior you desire, it receives an award, which reinforces the desired behavior so you get more of that behavior. There are many excellent books in stores or on-line that describe positive reinforcement training in detail and many give step-by-step instructions for training common commands like “leave it”. Look for books that specifically mention positive reinforcement training or clicker-training. You can also take dog training classes to learn the techniques, find a mentor who already uses clicker-training, or request a consult from one of the pet experts on this site to guide you.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. Why does a dogs pads on his paws turn such a pink color?
ANSWER : A. I’m confused here. Are your dogs paw pads typically black, but they turn a reddish pink? You may want to see your veterinarian about this to make sure there isn’t anything wrong with his paw pads. I’ve met dogs who have extremely fragile paw pads due to some bad genetics.. they end up getting injured on their paws very easily. I’ve met dogs who are unable to even walk on cement without wearing little doggy booties. It could be that your dog is dealing with some serious discomfort, and you want to get that checked out immediately.

If your dogs paw pads just seem a little bit irritated, you may want to try something like “Musher’s Secret” on them. This is an ointment that you rub on your dogs paw pads to keep them healthy, and smooth. I use this in the winter when there is rock salt all over the ground.. it keeps her paw pads from getting irritated and tearing open. It’s like lotioning your skin to keep it from getting dry and cracked. If you think your dog is dealing with something that is a little more extreme than just some dry irritated paw pads, then see your vet immediately instead of purchasing the Musher’s Secret.

Read Full Q/A … : Discolored Pads in Dogs

Q. Husband shamed dog for having an accident inside, and now she won’t poop when he takes her out. Can we fix this? He realizes he erred
ANSWER : A. Good on your husband for realizing that scolding is not the way to potty train! Hopefully these tips can help both him and your pup get back on the right track and make pottying outside successful.

If your dog is still a puppy, that is good news as you may be able to more easily time your potty outings with your dog’s schedule. Even if your dog is older, this schedule may help. Dogs generally have to go potty about 15 minutes after eating, drinking, waking up or playing. Knowing this, get your husband to start taking out your puppy at these key times, so puppy gets used to going out with him, and the urge to potty may be higher than any fear to go. If the potty is successful, have your husband reward the dog with a favorite treat! For bowel movements, dogs may take a little more time, and you may have to stand outside for a while (sometimes even 10 minutes) to give your dog a chance to go. If she doesn’t go, take her back inside and play some, then try again in about 15 minutes. Again, a success equals a treat which most dogs will like right away!

For any indoor potty accidents that occurred, an enzymatic cleaner is great for cleaning up urine and stool. Not only does it remove the stain and smell, but it breaks down the enzymes in the urine and stool your dog can smell, which may deter her from going potty there again.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. We have a 7 week old Toy Poodle/Bichon. We are trying to house train her, any tips would be appreciated. Thanks.
ANSWER : A. It’s understandable that she isn’t able to hold her bladder all that well yet. The bladder doesn’t fully develop until around 6-7 months of age. For now, you should be bringing your pup outside every 30 minutes, immediately after she eats/drinks, immediately after she plays, immediately after a nap, immediately after training.

Is she crate trained? If she is not crate trained, I have some wonderful crate training exercises I could go over. Crate training and potty training go hand-in-hand. Any time you cannot keep your eyes on the puppy, she should be in the crate so accidents do not occur. The main idea when it comes to potty training is to keep your puppy successful.

After a while of bringing her outside every 30 minutes, you can try to increase that time. What you should do is wait until the 30 minute marker strikes, and then begin some basic obedience using treats, or some puppy-play! Then go out a few minutes later. Teach her it’s fun to hold her bladder!