Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. There is no OTC substitute for Acepromazine. You can speak with your vet about alternative sedatives you can use for your pet.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Diazepam, a benzodiazepine, is a useful sedative agent and is a viable alternative to acepromazine administration. It displays minimal cardiovascular depressant effects even at the higher doses. However, intramuscular injection of diazepam is painful and unreliable.
Benadryl may be a good dog sedative for car travel, as it also helps with mild car sickness.
This item requires an active prescription from a vet visit within the last 12 months Details We`ll collect your pet and vet information to verify this prescription before shipping.. Acepromazine Maleate is a prescription medication for dogs who need tranquilization or for dogs who suffer from motion sickness.
Sedatives are usually administered orally or injected into a dog`s veins; it all depends on the required level of sedation. For oral sedation, acepromazine is most commonly prescribed by vets. Injectable sedatives include Telazol, dexmedetomidine, or a combination of acepromazine and butorphanol.
Acepromazine is similar to chlorpromazine, which is an antipsychotic medication used in humans. Because acepromazine is not used in humans, it is more difficult to predict what symptoms will occur.
Acepromazine should not be used in pets that have been exposed to organophosphates, strychnine, or procaine, or in pets with significant heart disease, low blood pressure, severe dehydration, tetanus, or shock.
The most common type of sleep medication given to pets is diazepam (Valium®), although longer acting benzodiazepines may be used (eg temazepam). The symptoms of cognitive dysfunction are sometimes treated with a drug called selegiline.
Veterinarians recommend giving dogs over 30lbs 5mg (1 tablet) melatonin every 12 hours. For smaller dogs (<30lbs), either give ½ tablet of melatonin every 12 hours, or visit our Amazon storefront for other dosages and flavors.
Acepromazine maleate is a prescription veterinary sedative and tranquilizer medication. The tablet form is FDA-approved for use in dogs and cats whereas the injectable form is FDA- approved for use in cats, dogs, and horses.
The 3 most common drugs used by veterinarians to calm dogs are acepromazine (PromAce®), diazepam (Valium®), and dexmedetomidine (Sileo). These drugs block certain signals in the central nervous system (CNS), making the animal calm or sedated.
Acepromazine. Acepromazine is both an oral and injectable drug that offers fast and reliable sedation. The injectable version is more often used than the oral type. The effects can usually be felt within 20-30 minutes.
We generally use propofol, which works within seconds to lightly sedate the pet. We then quickly proceed to administering a single dose of the euthanasia drug, pentobarbital (a type of barbiturate).
Acepromazine is one of the phenothiazine derivative psychotropic drugs, used little in humans, however frequently in animals as a sedative and antiemetic.
Acepromazine is a member of the class of phenothiazines that is 10H-phenothiazine substituted by an acetyl group at position 2 and a 3-(dimethylamino)propyl group at position 10. It has a role as a phenothiazine antipsychotic drug.
Acepromazine (generic of PromAce)
Diazepam – Can be dosed up to 2.2 mg/kg orally. It is important to remember that it can have a disinhibitory effect on certain patients. Removing what little inhibition the patient may have to bite you is less than ideal. Pentobarbital – doses up to 60mg/kg (pre-euthanasia) have been tried.
However, it`s important to talk to your vet before giving your dog Benadryl, as it can interact with other medications or health conditions. The recommended dosage to administer the medication is typically 0.9 to 1.8 milligrams per pound of your dog`s body weight, given 1-2 times per day.
Dosing Information of Diazepam for Dogs and Cats

The typical dose administered to dogs is 0.25 to 1 mg per pound (0.5 to 2 mg/kg) and 0.25 to 0.5 mg per pound (0.5 to 1 mg/kg) in cats, intravenous as needed or as often as every six hours or as a constant rate infusion (a slow drip through the intravenous line).

To keep your dog as comfortable as possible, your veterinarian will usually first give your dog a sedative injection that causes them to lose consciousness. The vet will then inject a high and fatal dose of a drug called sodium pentobarbital.
Acepromazine. Typically used to calm dogs down before and after a surgical procedure, Acepromazine is another strong drug that should only be administered by a professional. It`s sometimes used to help dogs with anxiety, making it a suitable option for nail clipping.
Contact a veterinarian immediately if your dog eats a large amount of melatonin (like a whole bottle). You can call your local vet, a pet emergency center, or a pet poison control service like ASPCA Animal Poison Control at (888) 426-4435 or Pet Poison Helpline at (855) 764-7661.
As a very general ballpark guide, oral doses of melatonin are typically as follows: 3mg per dose for dogs weighing less than 25lbs. 6mg per dose for dogs weighing more than 25lbs.
Acepromazine is a long lasting tranquilizer. It should be expected to last 6-8 hours. In extremely rare instances, some pets exhibit aggressive behavior as a reaction to acepromazine. Acepromazine drops blood pressure by dilating blood vessels.
The average cash price for Acepromazine Maleate is $202.99 per 25, 25GM of Powder, but you can pay just $428.93 with a SingleCare prescription drug discount card to use the Acepromazine Maleate coupon. Acepromazine Maleate is a generic drug; PromAce is the branded form of Acepromazine Maleate.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My Bulldog puppy growls, barks and even tries to bite me when I say “no” to him. What can I do?
ANSWER : A. First, avoid scolding him and acting aggressively towards him if you don’t want him to be acting aggressively towards you. There are other methods you can use to communicate to your dog that you don’t want him to continue doing what he is doing. I recommend you stop telling him “no”, scolding him, or raising your voice at him. Everything coming from you should be 100% positive and 100% calm.

Try to figure out ways to clearly communicate what you want to your dog. If you want your dog to leave something or someone alone, I strongly suggest teaching your dog commands like “leave it”. Here is a link to a video in which I explain how to do it:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=R1TS5nA7z5Q

Another thing I suggest you use is a no-reward marker. This clearly communicates when your dog has done something wrong. No-reward markers have to be introduced during your training sessions. You should be doing at least three training sessions per day, that are something like 3-10 minutes long (working on different things each training session). If you are teaching your dog something BRAND NEW, do not use the no-reward marker, as you do not want to discourage your dog from performing behaviors for you. Use the no-reward marker for known behaviors only. Here is another helpful video about this:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=sdU5a6fXKlg

Lure each new behavior (as shown in the video) using high value treats. Let’s say you’re working on “down” which is a behavior your dog knows fairly well. Present the treat to your dog. Ask your dog to “down” (only ask once). If he does not go “down” immediately, say, “uh-oh” or “eh-eh” in a gentle tone, and then place the treat behind your back. This communicates to your dog that they did something to make the treat go away.

After you place the treat behind your back to show your pup “that was wrong” you need to communicate to your pup “let’s try again” by getting your pup to walk around for a second, and then start the behavior all over again. If your puppy is very young, chances are you haven’t taught him a solid “down” behavior yet. So, as I said, do not use this method until you have lured each new behavior as shown in the video.

This is the order in which you should teach behaviors: Lure using a high value treat as shown in the video. After a few successful food lures, lure with an empty hand. If the pup is successful with the empty hand lure, reward with lots of treats. If the pup is unsuccessful, then go back to food-luring a couple more times. After a few successful empty-hand lures, you can begin to add the cue. Say “sit”, then lure with an empty hand, and then reward. Once your pup understands the cue, begin to work on the no-reward marker.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

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Q. Is there a otc drug I can use in place of Acepromazine?
ANSWER : A. There is no OTC substitute for Acepromazine. You can speak with your vet about alternative sedatives you can use for your pet.

Q. One of my pet’s ears seems very irritated. What I can use to clean it with?
ANSWER : A. Ear Irritation can be caused by a number of things ranging from allergies, ear infections or even mites. Dirty ears can also cause irritation and problems. Knowing the type of problem is best for figuring out how to treat it.

For plain dirty ears that do not have any odor, redness or leakage of discharge/debris, a simple over the counter canine ear cleaner can be used. Gently soak some cotton balls or a washcloth with the cleaner, and then use these to wipe out the flap of the ear and opening to the ear. Do NOT use Q-tips as these can become stuck or lodged in the curve of the ear canal and may cause injury to the ear drum.

If the ear is bright red or itchy without any dirt or debris in it, it may indicate an allergy. Sometimes an allergy medication can help provide relief in this situation. Your vet can give you the correct dosages of an over the counter allergy medication to use, or may recommend one specifically for dogs.

For infections and mites, changes to the ear such as bad smell or lots of debris and discharge, flecks of black or brown debris, or scabs and sores in the ear may be present. In these cases, it is best to have your vet take a sample of the ear debris to test for mites or infection. Your vet can then give you an ointment that is placed and left in the ear between ear cleanings. Most vets will then recommend cleaning the ears twice daily and then leaving in the ointment after for a period of ten days.

Ear mites ARE contagious to other pets, so if your dog does have them, it is best to treat any other pets in the house at the same time to prevent the mites from spreading around continuously.

Q. My cat will not stop going to the toilet on my carpet, bed, washing pile etc.. Also uses its litter box occasionally? I don’t understand why this is?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.
If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.
The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. My cat started to pee outside the litter box. What should I do?
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate bathroom use in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his defecating outside the box.

Once medical issues are ruled out, it’s time to take a look at other explanations. Has there been a lot of activity that wasn’t normal? Were you away and your cat was left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox located in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet, or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Have you changed the brand of litter or kind? Or is there something about the spot he has chosen to use that is attracting him in some way? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out as a way of expressing their dissatisfaction.

The general rule of thumb is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped at least daily, if not more often and changed completely on a weekly basis, and washed with soap and water.

You can also offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystal kind, since it makes a hissing sound when wet that can startle some cats and make them reluctant to use it again.

The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litterbox. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation.

Q. Are cottonelle moist wipes (designed for humans) safe to use on puppy’s fur?
ANSWER : A. While ingredients of this product are not easy to find, it seems that if the product is safe to use on humans for wiping, it should be OK for use externally to clean off dirt or debris on the fur.

It is best to try a small area of skin to try the product on first, and then watch for any reactions. Signs of adverse reaction include itching, redness, rash or irritation at the site used. If any irritation is seen, use should be discontinued. If no irritation is seen, it should be OK to use the wipes on a larger part of the body.

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.