vet.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should take her to your vet. She could have parasites or GI issues that might be able to be corrected with a prescription food trial or probiotics.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

If your dog has been experiencing diarrhea for over 48 hours or has additional symptoms such as vomiting, fever, and loss of appetite, see your veterinarian ASAP. Your vet may recommend fasting, anti-diarrhea medication, or a bland diet to get your pup back on their feet.
A bland diet for 24 to 48 hours may help to resolve your pup`s issue. Plain-cooked white rice with a little chicken and some canned plain pumpkin (not pumpkin pie filling) may help to make your pup`s tummy feel better. Once your pooch feels better, gradually reintroduce their regular food.
If a pet stops eating, is lethargic, the diarrhea is black or tarry in quality, there is associated vomiting, or the diarrhea doesn`t resolve in 48-72 hours then veterinary care should be sought.” Under normal conditions, water is absorbed through your dog`s gastrointestinal (GI) tract to be used within the body.
Your veterinarian may recommend the oral administration of an intestinal protectant such as kaolin clay and pectin (KaoPectate™) or a suspension containing bismuth subsalicylate (PeptoBismol™).
Eating bland foods can help diarrhea go away faster and prevent stomach upset and irritation. You can follow the BRAT diet, which stands for “bananas, rice, applesauce, toast.” This diet also helps firm up stool.
Chronic diarrhea is a severe condition in dogs. If you find that your dog has been suffering from diarrhea for more than twenty-four hours, you must take your pup to see the veterinarian. Due to water loss in the stool, dehydration is dangerous for your dog, so do not hesitate to take them.
If your dog has a single bout of diarrhea and is otherwise acting normally, there is no need to be concerned. Keep an eye on your dog`s bowel movements to see if things improve. More than two episodes of diarrhea may indicate a problem, so contact your veterinarian if your dog has two or more bouts of diarrhea.
Antidiarrheals/Antinauseants. Bismuth subsalicylate (Pepto-Bismol®) is commonly kept in medicine cabinets for digestive upsets and can be administered to your dog. If your dog has never taken it before, check with your veterinary healthcare team before dosing.
An alternative cleaning solution that has a strong deodorizing properties can be made by mixing 16 fluid ounces of hydrogen peroxide with 1 teaspoon of dish-washing liquid and 1 tablespoon of baking soda. Work this into the stain and leave it to soak in for 5 minutes. Absorb the excess with paper towel.
Usually most diarrhea will run its course within two to four days, although in some cases, it can last longer. If there are any other signs of illness like vomiting, loss of appetite, depression, or pain, a veterinary trip is in order.
In general, for small dogs, a couple of slices of banana is enough, while larger dogs can have up to half a banana. The high fiber content of bananas can help with dog diarrhea, but the high sugar content of bananas can also cause your dog to have an upset stomach.
Studies have confirmed that honey shortens the duration of diarrhea in patients with bacterial gastroenteritis through its antibacterial properties. In nonbacterial gastroenteritis, honey had the same effect as glucose on the duration of the diarrhea.
Plain rice is one of the best foods you can feed a dog with diarrhoea. Why? Mainly, because it`s so easy for dogs to digest. Containing a large amount of fibre that absorbs water, rice can help stabilise your dog`s stools, making it an ideal choice for post-diarrhoea feeding.
Pets that have chronic soft stool or chronic full-blown diarrhea should definitely be examined by a veterinarian, even if they are otherwise behaving normally. In these cases, there is likely an underlying problem that`s causing the diarrhea. This is especially true with older pets.
Take your pet to the vet immediately if they are experiencing any of the signs listed below: Your pet is otherwise happy, but diarrhea continues more than 48 hours. Your pet acts sick along with having diarrhea, such as being lethargic, vomiting, or loss of appetite.
Rice is bland and therefore gentle for a dog experiencing diarrhea. It is also high in fiber, which will help bulk-up your dog`s loose stool. Give your dog 1/4 cup of rice for each 10 pounds of weight. For example, a 20 pound dog would eat 1/2 cup of rice.
Your dog`s diarrhea could be caused bacteria found in raw or improperly cooked meats, meat left sitting out for awhile or in decaying vegetables. Studies show dogs can pick up a bacterial infection if kenneled with another dog that has it. Diarrhea can occur every two to four weeks and could be ongoing for years.
If you have checked the feeding amount is correct, cut out treats and spaced the meals and your dog is still producing soft poo the addition of just a couple of tablespoons of cooked carrot, sweet potato or squash to their meal can work wonders in firming up their poo. It should be a pretty quick change too.
3) Carrots can help canines with bowel movement regularity.

If your dog has loose stools, he may benefit by adding carrots to his diet. The added fiber may help to add some bulk to his stools. “You`ll want to be cautious when adding them to their diet in large amounts too quickly —start slow.

The Environmental Protection Agency endorses flushing as a safe way to dispose of dog feces.
In summary, 7 important causes of bloody diarrhea in dogs include parasites, infectious diseases, dietary indiscretion, HGE, ulcerative colitis, stress colitis, and toxins. If you`re a dog owner, it`s important to be aware of these causes of bloody diarrhea in dogs.
Possibly the most common causes for this medical issue in dogs is intestinal parasites, infections, ingesting toxins, foreign bodies, and problems with the anal glands. However, injuries and many other medical conditions can potentially cause a dog to have bloody diarrhea as well.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. How do I FINALLY rid all 4 of my cats of tapeworms after 2 years of dealing with it? Fleas seem to be controlled. I know they are the vector.
ANSWER : A. If your cats keep getting tapeworms, then they are picking up fleas from somewhere. Fleas will hitch a ride on your pant leg from outside.

Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

You can also use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the life cycle.

Q. My dog doesn’t eat, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. If this is a puppy, see a veterinarian immediately. Puppies should want to eat. Common causes for anorexia in puppies include viruses (parvo is a big one), parasitism, and foreign bodies. They need immediate care – go to an emergency vet if yours isn’t open. Puppies can get low blood sugar and dehydration very quickly.

If this is an adult dog and you observe other concerning signs, such as diarrhea or decreased energy, you should see a veterinarian.

If the dog seems otherwise bright and stable, try offering different types of food: wet food, canned tripe, or cooked chicken and rice. Some dogs will go for canned baby food: chicken, turkey, or beef as the main ingredient. Make sure there are no garlic or onions in the ingredients!

Causes of anorexia in adult dogs can range from less serious to severe. Younger dogs are more likely to get into trouble- they tend to eat things they shouldn’t, and can get foreign bodies from eating things like socks, or stomach upset from getting in the trash. Any dog may stop eating due to stress, or just being a picky eater. Middle aged dogs can stop eating when they’re stressed and also have Addison’s disease, which can be fatal. Older dogs tend to stop eating when they develop cancer or renal disease.

There is no one-size-fits-all recipe to know when the right time is to take your dog to the vet. The moral of this story is, if it’s not getting better, your pup feels bad, or you’re worried – go see the vet!

Read Full Q/A … : My Dog Won’t Eat

Q. Why is my dog shaking and stiff ass if he is having a seizers
ANSWER : A. That may be exactly what is happening to him. Make sure he is in a safe place where he can’t hurt himself, away from furniture or anything that can fall on him. If he seems to be recovering, call your veterinarian and let them know what happened. Keep a close eye on him, if he has another seizure on the heels of this one, then he needs to be seen by your vet right away. Sustained or repeated seizures can cause the body temperature to rise to dangerous levels and increases the risk of brain damage.

When you have a chance, take a look around and see if you can find anything he might have gotten into, since poisoning is one of the causes of seizures. If he has a history of liver or kidney disease, this is also a potential cause. Sometimes we never know why a pet has a seizure. If he does have a series of seizures, your vet will want to do an exam and bloodwork to try and determine a cause and potentially put your pet on anti-seizure medication to lessen the chances of this happening again in the future.

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. Is there anything I can do if my boxer gets the runs? It’s just happened and don’t know when I should be worried about it or take Her to the vet.
ANSWER : A. You should take her to your vet. She could have parasites or GI issues that might be able to be corrected with a prescription food trial or probiotics.

Read Full Q/A … : Leerburg

Q. Hi I am doing a research report on Vets. I was wondering on how you became a vet. What you did when you got into college and High school.
ANSWER : A. In the UK we study most subjects up to Gcse (age 16) then we go onto A levels. The best subjects to choose to get into vet school here are maths, chemistry and biology. You have to get top grades in them to be given a chance of getting into vet school. We then go onto a university that offers veterinary medicine which was only 6 in the whole of the UK when I did it. Work experience also helps with getting a place at the university. I did lots of work in my local vet practice and also 2 weeks at London zoo.

Read Full Q/A … : Lab Animal Vets c/o 2016