e. What

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should see a vet. She probably has cat flu. fleas should be killed by good quality drug, deworming is also needed. Third eyelid could be exposed due to dehydration or malnutrition.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

The feline viruses and bacteria that cause pink eye in cats cannot be transmitted to humans. If you have multiple cats, however, you can accidentally transmit an infection from one fur baby to another through petting, feeding, or brushing. Even your dog can be susceptible to conjunctivitis, says PetCareRx.
Some eye infections are caused by parasites such as ticks or fleas, and still others are caused by illness, like the canine flu or distemper.
Conjunctivitis can also be seen when cats have reactions to various allergens such as plant pollens, fleas and foods. Foreign bodies, such as grass seeds as well as cat scratches to the surface of the eye, can lead to corneal ulcers which then results in conjunctivitis.
Young kittens with herpes viral conjunctivitis may have such a severe infection that their eyes become sealed shut with the discharged matter. The eyes must be opened in these cases, or permanent damage, even blindness, may occur. These kittens also typically have runny noses, nasal discharge, sneezing, and coughing.
In case you have been letting your cat lick your eyeball lately, here`s a warning: don`t. A woman in Ohio recently lost vision in her left eye after becoming infected with Bartonella henselae, a pathogen that is normally subclinical in cats but can cause a variety of symptoms in humans.
Make sure you take a cat or kitten with an eye infection to a vet so you can get the correct diagnosis and prescription, since treating a cat with the wrong eye medication can be useless or even harmful. For example, if the surface of the eye has been harmed, a steroid ointment could cause permanent damage.
To the naked eye, fleas will look like small, dark, oval-shaped insects with hard shells. As you comb, you`re likely to see them quickly weaving their way through the fur on your pet as you part it. It`s also likely you`ll find them attached to the skin of your pet. These are blood-eating insects.
Natural treatment for eye infection

If you believe your dog or cat may have some eye irritation, try using a homemade saline solution made from 1/4 teaspoon of salt and 1 cup of lukewarm water. Drip the saline solution into your pet`s eye using a cotton ball or eye dropper 3 or 4 times a day.

Red, irritated eyes with cloudy, yellow or green discharge could be signs of an eye infection in newborn kittens. You may see the upper and lower eyelids become stuck together and even swell outward. Both of the cat`s eyes may be infected. Protect yourself and your pet.
Stray kittens can also carry various infectious diseases that can be transmitted to other cats in the household, such as feline leukemia virus, panleukopenia, rhinotracheitis and calicivirus. Overall, the risks from adopting stray kittens are low, but they are real.
Usually a green or yellow discharge indicates there is a bacterial infection involved. Runny eyes can be a sign of an upper respiratory infection, more commonly known as `cat flu`. Cat flu is most commonly (over 90% of cases) caused by infection with feline calicivirus or feline herpesvirus.
Owning a cat is linked to Toxoplasmosis and the eye disorder, glaucoma. So, if you`re considered the “crazy cat lady” in your neighborhood, you might want to pay heed.
Eye allergies, or allergic conjunctivitis, can be caused by many seasonal or environmental factors, including cats. Other causes include: Pollen. Pet dander.
A stray kitten will almost certainly have fleas, and may also have worms.
Using a flea and tick cleansing shampoo formulated specifically for cats can ensure you kill any lingering fleas or eggs. For cats with sensitive skin, try a foaming shampoo and wash that contains oatmeal for soothing, long-lasting protection from pre-adult fleas.
Eye discharge can be a symptom of an upper respiratory infection, such as feline herpesvirus or feline calicivirus. Eye discharge can be a symptom of allergies, such as seasonal allergies or allergies to certain substances in the environment.
Symptoms Of Eye Infections In Kittens

Red inflamed eyes and eyelids. Discharge (clear or pus-like) Eyelids sticking to the front of eyes. Swollen eyelids that bulge outward.

Mix together 1 pint water, 1/2-teaspoon salt, and 1/2 teaspoon calendula tincture. Soak an injured paw in the solution. If the wound is on the body, put the solution in a squirt bottle or large syringe and gently apply it to the injured area. Repeat the soaking or application every 4 to 6 hours for the first 24 hours.
One of the main causes of sneezing is infection. In some cases, the vet may take a swab from the mouth, throat, eyes, or nose and send it to a lab to confirm an infection. Inhaled irritants or allergens are other common causes of sneezing in cats. Viral, bacterial, or fungal infections.
You`ll need to make some salt solution (add a quarter of a teaspoon of salt to a cup of hot water) and bathe their eye several times a day, using cotton wool. If their eye hasn`t improved after a couple of days, you may need to visit your vet for antibiotics.
A dark crusty material in the corners of the eyes can also be normal. Tears contain pigments that when exposed to sunlight turn dark. This is not due to blood or infection. Just like many people have “sleep” in their eyes each morning, so do many cats.
Fleas cannot survive in human hair, but they can temporarily infect humans and cause allergies. A flea bite can cause an intense itching on the scalp, as well as red bumps or pus-filled blisters (usually on the neck or scalp).
Fleas are tiny, but they`re not microscopic. If your home is infested, you may see them in carpets or bedding. Fleas are wingless. They range from light reddish-brown to black in color.
Black tea contains theaflavins and thearubigins, which are thought to have antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory actions on the body. While not fully proven, these molecules have the potential to aid in mild cases of canine and feline conjunctivitis (a.k.a. pink eye).

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.

Q. Just brought in stray kitten approx 3 – 4 months old. Has fleas also eye discharge and the third eyelid is exposed. She does cough and sneeze. What
ANSWER : A. You should see a vet. She probably has cat flu. fleas should be killed by good quality drug, deworming is also needed. Third eyelid could be exposed due to dehydration or malnutrition.

Q. I was told by my vet that my dogs cherry eye was caused by something hitting his eye when he was poking around under a bush. I was told surgery needed
ANSWER : A. Prolapsed gland of the eyelid refers to a pink mass protruding from the animal’s eyelid; it is also called a “cherry eye.” Normally, the gland is anchored by an attachment made up of fibrous material. The most common sign of “cherry eye” is an oval mass protruding from the dogs’s third eyelid. It can occur in one or both eyes, and may be accompanied by swelling and irritation. He may have acquired it by getting an injury to his eye but this isn’t the case sometimes. Sometimes there is a weakness in the fibrous attachment.

The veterinarian will review the mass in the dog’s third eyelid and determine if there is an underlying cause for the condition. The diagnosis of the prolapsed gland could be scrolled or everted cartilage in the third eyelid, abnormal cells in the third eye, or a prolapse of fat in the dog’s eye.

Treatment often includes surgical replacement of the gland in the dog’s eye, or removal of the entire gland if the condition is severe. Conversely, if medications are recommended, they are typically topical anti-inflammatory drugs that are effective in reducing swelling.

Q. We brought 2 new kittens home. One of them is sneezing. We have a Sr cat and an adult who is now coughing. What to do?
ANSWER : A. Commonly respiratory infections (viral -Herpesvirus and Calicivirus- and possibly bacterial) can cause sneezing episodes in kitten especially if not vaccinated yet. If your kitten is affected by respiratory infection could develop or have more signs such as discharge from eyes, more discharge from nose, coughing, being lethargic, depressed and inappetent.

The coughing episodes of the adult cat could be completely unrelated to the cause of sneezing of your new kitten, especially if your adult cat is already vaccinated.

The cause of cough in adult cats are not necessarily related to respiratory problems, heart problems could cause that as well.

Keep the nose and the eyes of your kitten free from discharge, keep your kitten warm and take both of them to your veterinarian as soon as possible to identify the cause and the relationship of the two problems and treat appropriately.

Q. How do I FINALLY rid all 4 of my cats of tapeworms after 2 years of dealing with it? Fleas seem to be controlled. I know they are the vector.
ANSWER : A. If your cats keep getting tapeworms, then they are picking up fleas from somewhere. Fleas will hitch a ride on your pant leg from outside.

Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

You can also use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the life cycle.

Q. Need help, we have done flea bath ,sprayed the house and used charts ultra guard pro and still have fleas .how can we get rid of them
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. Our cat developed a flea allergy in the form of red sores above the eyes Our vet gave him an antibiotic shot and a flea collar but they remain.
ANSWER : A. I’m so sorry to hear! Flea allergies are tough to deal with! Unfortunately when a pet has an allergy to fleas, the problem lies in the flea bite. The actual allergy lies in the flea saliva, so what we really need to prevent is the flea biting our pet! I would recommend a product that can kill the flea before they even have a chance to bite your pet! A couple of really great products on the market right now are Frontline Plus and Revolution. Both are liquid topical products that you place on the skin of your pet once a month. They work by using the skins oils to spread themselves around the body and rest in the hair follicles. Each has a slightly different mechanism of use, but they both work to kill the flea before it actually has a chance to do harm to your cat. Flea collars simply are not as effective. I would also recommend treating your home environment, such as the area where the cat sleeps and the carpets inside your home. Flea eggs and larva can live for a very long time in these environments and unless we treat all of these areas, the problem will remain. I hope this was helpful! Good luck and I hope your kitty feels better!

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.