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A. Watch him very carefully. The lard and peanut butter could trigger a case of gastritis, so if you see vomiting and/or diarrhea take him to your vet for treatment. I would with hold feedings until 8 hours have passed post-ingestion, then feed small frequent amounts of a bland diet like boiled white meat chicken and boiled white rice mixed 25% chicken to 75% rice.

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Quantity. As mentioned previously, a small amount (roughly a handful) of fresh bird seed, peanuts, or suet is unlikely to be harmful to your dog. However, if a more substantial quantity is consumed you may face some issues, primarily gastrointestinal upsets with vomiting, diarrhoea and bloating.
Aflatoxin Poisoning

A few choice tastes of birdseed that is fresh are not usually harmful to a dog. However, seeds that are old or become damp may breed mold and aflatoxin. And suddenly, they can be very harmful for a dog to consume.

Suet is technically defined as the hard fat around the kidneys and loins in beef and mutton, but in common usage, most kinds of beef fat are also called suet and can safely be fed to birds.
As an energy-dense food, peanut butter is high in calories and fat, which is why when it comes to your dog`s health, less is more. Too much of it could lead to obesity and other health complications, like pancreatitis.
Suet is one of the most popular and beneficial foods you can offer birds. In addition, suet attracts multiple species, so you can be sure it will entice lots of feathered friends to your backyard.
Can humans eat suet? Yes.
Pets suffering from aflatoxin poisoning may experience signs such as sluggishness, loss of appetite, vomiting, jaundice (yellowish tint to the eyes, gums or skin due to liver damage), unexplained bruising or bleeding, and/or diarrhea.
The good news: peanuts are not considered toxic to dogs. However, it`s important to understand that while peanuts are safe to use in dog cookies and other treats, they are high in fat. Dogs have a more difficult time digesting fat. A high concentration of fat can cause an upset stomach, including diarrhea and vomiting.
Suet is a good high-fat food for birds because it is readily available and relatively inexpensive. Another good high-fat option, albeit more expensive, is peanut butter.
Lard is a safe alternative to rendered beef fat. In fact, a combination of lard and peanut butter makes a nice base for any bird-friendly recipe. But bacon drippings are not recommended because the chemical preservatives in commercial bacon become more concentrated when cooked.
Yes, dogs can eat bananas. In moderation, bananas are a great low-calorie treat for dogs. They`re high in potassium, vitamins, biotin, fiber, and copper. They are low in cholesterol and sodium, but because of their high sugar content, bananas should be given as a treat, not part of your dog`s main diet.
Can most dogs eat yogurt? Yes, but that doesn`t necessarily mean that they should. While yogurt is not toxic to dogs, many canines might have trouble digesting it because it contains lactose. And plenty of pups have trouble with foods that contain lactose, such as milk.
Birds will eat the fat of cattle, hogs and other animals. However, the fatty food most commonly fed backyard birds is beef fat also known as suet. The very best suet is found around the kidneys and loins of cattle. When rendered, this fat won`t become rancid or melt in warm weather as quickly as other fats.
Gelatin is a natural product and safe for birds.
Fledglings need a good source of protein and energy to grow. Luckily, a lot of protein-rich foods are soft (or can be made soft). Fruit, live mealworms and suet can be broken down into small chunks so that the fledglings receive the correct nutrients without the risk of choking.
So can you eat bird food? In a way, yes, you can – but buy it from your local health food shop or supermarket as ours is for the birds. Birds eat an astonishing variety of items when they are available and just like humans they love to eat things like sunflower seeds and millet.
Eat Suet raw.

Some carnivore customers prefer to eat their suet raw. Our only advice is to make sure it is a clean toxin free source of Suet that comes from Organic Grass-fed cattle. Keep in freezer and use as needed.

Fatty foods such as butter, oils, meat drippings/grease, chocolate and meat scraps may cause pancreatitis (inflammation of the pancreas) when ingested, especially by dogs. Certain breeds, miniature Schnauzers in particular, are more likely to develop pancreatitis than other breeds.
Peanut butter is an awesome ingredient in homemade pet snacks. Whether you want to make crunchy peanut butter cookies for your pooch or some frozen peanut butter balls for them to enjoy in the summer, you can always add peanut butter to your homemade dog snacks!
Heat treatment can also reduce aflatoxin levels. However, the effects depend on the type, time, and temperature used. Adding chemicals like hydroxide, bicarbonate, and calcium chloride can enhance the results. Ozone treatment at 8.5–40 ppm at different temperatures can eradicate aflatoxins B1 and G1.
Aflatoxin B1 was the most prevalent aflatoxin in both raw peanuts (range, 1.2 μg/kg to 90.8 μg/kg) and peanut butter (range, 4.7 to 382.9 μg/kg).
Cheese can be given as an occasional treat in moderation, alongside a healthy diet. If your dog manages to eat a whole block or other large amount of cheese, they may vomit. Keep an eye on them, and call your vet for advice if they become unwell.
Yes. Raw pineapple, in small amounts, is an excellent snack for dogs. Canned pineapple, on the other hand, should be avoided. The syrup in canned fruits contains too much sugar for most dogs` digestive tracts to handle.
Yes, birds can eat raw porridge oats. Oats are a very nutritious grain and good for birds in moderation, especially in the winter months. Many birds enjoy oats, especially blackbirds. Never served cooked oats as they are sticky and may glue a birds beak closed as they dry.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. MinPin ate a glob of bird suet (lard, peanut butter,flour and corn meal). Danger? He got about 1/3 cup down.
ANSWER : A. Watch him very carefully. The lard and peanut butter could trigger a case of gastritis, so if you see vomiting and/or diarrhea take him to your vet for treatment. I would with hold feedings until 8 hours have passed post-ingestion, then feed small frequent amounts of a bland diet like boiled white meat chicken and boiled white rice mixed 25% chicken to 75% rice.

Read Full Q/A … : How to Make Homemade Suet

Q. I’m fostering some now motherless 5 week old Pitbull puppies. There are 5 of them. How much do I feed them? I give them blue buffalo puppy food by wa
ANSWER : A. It should say on the Blue Buffalo on the back under, “puppies” or some sort of age chart. Make sure it’s puppy food.. puppies need extra protein and nutrients. http://bluebuffalo.com/product-finder/dog/?facets=Puppy,Dog_DryFood#

http://www.bullytree.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/08/Feeding-Chart-Blue-Buffalo.gif – On the back of a puppy-food bag from Blue Buffalo it says underneath 3-5 months, “3 to 20 lbs: feed 1/3 – 1 1/4 cups per day” and “21 to 50 lbs: feed 1 1/2 – 3 cups per day.” Make sure you are breaking that up into at least three meals. Let’s say you decide to feed them 1 1/2 cups per day each, then, you should measure that out, and set it aside. Throughout the day, you should offer at least three mealtimes with that set-aside amount. You want to start with the least amount, and then if they seem hungry (licking the floors, begging you constantly for food, whining/crying) feed them a little more until you get it right. Do not overfeed, and try to avoid underfeeding a well.

Q. How much should I feed my cat?
ANSWER : A. How much a cat should eat depends on many variables including his activity level, metabolic rate and the food you are offering. Use the feeding guide on the cat food label as a starting point. These instructions usually read something like, “for cats weighing 5 lbs, feed between 1/2 and 3/4 cup per day; for cat’s weighing 10 lbs, feed between 3/4 and 1 cup per day; and for cats weighing 15 lbs, feed between 1 cup and 1 1/2 cups per day”.

Use your cat’s body condition to fine tune the amount you offer. For example, if he is overweight offer an amount on the low end of the recommended range and reevaluate in a few weeks to a month. Your veterinarian can also help you determine how much of a particular food you should be offering.

Q. My 3 month puppy eats his own poop and is also biting what can I do to prevent this
ANSWER : A. When it comes to poop eating, you want to consider a few things. First off, what is his diet like? Maybe something is lacking in his diet that is causing him to want to eat his own poop. This is the most common reason why dogs eat THEIR OWN poop. Try a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Ziwipeak, Orijen.. and try feeding three meals per day, instead of the more common two meals per day. Remember to gradually switch his kibble. Add a little bit of the new kibble and reduce the old kibble very slowly.. little by little every couple of days until the bowl is mostly new kibble! You should also be cleaning up his poops IMMEDIATELY after he does them.. I mean like, you have a bag in your hand, and you are low enough to scoop it up RIGHT when he finished so he doesn’t have a chance to eat his poop.

When it comes to nipping there are a few things you can do. First, you should yelp as soon as the teeth touch your skin, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore the puppy until he is ignoring you. Once he is off doing his own thing, swoop down and calmly reward him by playing with him WITH A TOY so he doesn’t nip your hands. Whenever you pet him, or interact with him, you should always have a toy on-hand so you can give it to him. This toy should be a soft braided rope toy that YOU own. This means, your puppy is never allowed to have this toy on the floor, and your pup can never “win” tug games with this toy. This is YOUR toy that disappears when you’re finished playing, and reappears when you want to play. If you keep this up, in a weeks time, your puppy will be so excited to see that toy, that as soon as you bring it out, he stops nipping you because he wants to play with the toy. Another thing you can do is have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/soft toys/squeaky toys/etc. After one week, Bag#1 disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys as Bag#1, and it only stays out for one week. This keeps the toys feeling like new to your pup!

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. I currently feed my 2 year 31 lb Beagle 1 1/2 cups of Eukanuba a day. I was thinking of changing his food, can you recommend something?
ANSWER : A. If you are looking for a higher end food to feed your Beagle, there are many available now in commercial pet stores. Many brands such as Blue Buffalo, Nutro Natural Choice and others offer holistic foods that tend to be more meat based than carbohydrate based. Some brands such as Royal Canin also offer foods that are specific to certain breeds. This means the products tend to have more digestible ingredients in them rather than fillers. They may also avoid some allergenic ingredients such as corn, wheat and soy products which can cause digestive issues in some dogs. However, Eukanuba, Science Diet and others are a good mid-grade brand and many dogs do very well on it.

If you do decide to switch your dog’s food, it should be done so gradually to avoid digestive upset. A routine of 9 days is best for switching over. This involves 3 days of 25% new/75% old, 3 days of 50/50 and 3 days of 25%old/75% new before finally feeding only the new food. Also be advised that depending on the ingredient changes, foods that have different grains or fewer grains in them may slightly change the consistency and size of your dog’s stool.

Q. I have two 3 week old kittens that I am bottle feeding. The kittens both have diareaa and there buts are red. Is there anything I can do ?
ANSWER : A. Diarrhea in kittens can be caused by many things, including intestinal parasites (very common in kittens), wrong formula, recent changes in diet (from queen’s milk to formula or from one formula to another), and other gastrointestinal upsets. Their bottoms are likely red and irritated from the diarrhea soiling the fur and skin, trapping moisture against the skin and serving as a breeding ground for bacteria. First, stop feeding the formula. Second, collect a fecal sample to be analyzed by your veterinarian for intestinal parasites. Third, call your vet and make an appointment as soon as possible, ideally the same day. Diarrhea in kittens is serious business and can lead to death from dehydration and loss of nutrients. Finally, in place of formula give an electrolyte replacement solution (like Pedialyte for infants/children) – plain, no flavors, no colors – for at least the next 1-2 feedings. This is not the same as a sports drink. After the 1st or 2nd feeding of straight electrolyte replacement solution, start to add formula back into diet at 1/4 strength ( 1 part formula to 3 parts water), The following feeding mix 2 parts formula to 2 parts water. Then, 3 parts formula to 1 part water. Finally, offer full-strength formula. If the diarrhea continues or worsens with increasing amounts of formula, go back to just electrolyte solution and repeat the process.

Q. My dog ate individually wrapped cookies including the plastic. He is acting normal. Should I take him in or just monitor for now
ANSWER : A. It really depends how many cookies and wraps he ate, if he ate a lot and these cookies contained chocolate as well, i would strongly advise taking him to the vet in order for him to get an injection that will induce vomiting immediately.

If he only ate a couple, without any chocolate in it, i would advise monitoring his appetite, vomiting and diarrhea (it could be normal if has those 1-2 times but not more). if he doesn’t seem himself take him to the vet, otherwise the plastic papers will probably pass in the poo.