d urine.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should discuss this with the vet which vaccinated him. The symptoms you report are unusual after vaccination and more so if the vaccine is more than 7-10days previous but symptoms of difficulty swallowing and reduced appetite/thirst/urination in an older cat should be investigated regardless; blood and urine tests may be required to rule out internal causes. Your vet can contact the vaccine company if there is any link

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Lethargy, a slight fever, and some mild discomfort are the most common side effects pets get from vaccines. This can be characterized by your pet not acting like their usual self. This is a normal reaction to vaccinations, and the symptoms should be mild and only last one or two days.
Rarely, unusual side effects such as respiratory difficulty, polyarthritis (seen as lameness), or cancer formation at sight of vaccination (see VAS below) are seen. Acute collapse or death has also been reported with numbers thought to be anywhere from 0.1 to 3 cats in 10,000 cats.
Another side effect of distemper vaccination is a vaccine reaction. Vaccine reactions in cats are rare. Symptoms of a reaction include red splotches or hives on the belly or swelling of the face. If you notice these symptoms, call your veterinarian immediately as vaccine reactions can be life threatening.
There are some common vaccine side effects that often only last a few days and disappear without treatment: Low energy (lethargy) Eating less. Sleeping more.
Muscle fasciculations and tremors in cats can be caused by intoxications, metabolic derangements, encephalomyelitis, feline hyperaesthesia syndrome and cerebellar diseases.
Adverse reactions within 30 days of vaccination were reported at a rate of 0.52% of cats vaccinated. The most commonly reported vaccine reactions are lethargy, anorexia and fever for a few days after vaccination, or local inflammation at the site of injection.
The injection site and reaction to the vaccine can make many cats feel sore and irritable. Give your cat at least a day after to rest up from the experience. Monitor the food and litter box use and let her rest. Usually by the next day just carry on as normal.
What breeds are susceptible to a vaccine reaction? One study found that Dachshunds, Pugs, Boston Terriers, Miniature Pinschers and Chihuahuas were more likely to experience reactions to vaccines than other breeds and is likely due to a genetic predisposition.
Is it safe to get multiple vaccinations at the same time? If your cat has always tolerated vaccinations well, it`s absolutely safe to go ahead and get multiple boosters simultaneously.
Panleukopenia (feline distemper): This highly contagious and potentially lethal virus causes fever, vomiting, diarrhea, loss of appetite, and in some cases, sudden death. Kittens are particularly susceptible.
What are signs of feline distemper? Clinical signs of feline distemper include diarrhea (with or without blood), depression, lethargy, dehydration, painful abdomen, vomiting, or in more severe cases, collapse or even death.
More specifically to determine cat distemper symptoms you should look for high fever, vomiting, anorexia, (abdominal pain from anorexia or hunched over position) and lethargy. The panleukopenia virus will also show a drop in white blood cell count, and can also be detected through finding antibodies in the blood.
A large majority of cats wont experience side effects from their shots. If a reaction does occur, they tend to be minor and last only last a short period of time. However, in rare situations some serious reactions could happen such as: Fever.
Side effects are rare and typically include only slight fever, lethargy, decreased appetite, and/or a localized swelling at the vaccine site. In some excessively rare cases, a cat can have an allergic reaction to the vaccine, leading to hives, extreme weakness, and unexplained collapse.
Occasional head shaking is perfectly normal but if your cat suddenly starts shaking their head a lot more than usual it`s likely to indicate a problem such as: Ear infection. Aural haematoma. Ear mites.
Talk to your veterinarian about possible therapeutic treatment options such as massage or acupuncture therapy. He or she may also recommend an antianxiety drug to cats with severe cases of the condition, but there is no known treatment method for curing twitch-skin syndrome in cats.
Usually there are no side effects to the F3. Occasionally a cat may feel lethargic or develop a localised reaction to the injection site. This is not serious, but let us know so that we can be sure to dispense appropriate medications to relieve irritation at the next vaccination.
Canine Distemper Virus, Adenovirus-2 and Parvovirus (DAPP), +/- Parainfluenza Virus Commonly called the “distemper shot,” this combination vaccine actually protects against the four diseases in its full name. Rabies. Rabies virus is fatal and all mammals, including humans, are susceptible to infection.
A change in behaviour implies something`s not quite right. The stress of moving home, a new baby, or being left alone for long periods of time can all trigger antisocial behaviour. If those things have been ruled out you may need to arrange a visit to the vet, especially if your cat is growling or biting when touched.
A vet visit leaves all sorts of new smells clinging to a cat: new people, other animals, medications, cleaning products, etc. Cats rely so heavily on scent to understand their environment and identify friend from foe. A change in a cat`s scent can cause housemates to view them as a threat.
Shock Lung in Cats. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) involves severe inflammation of the lungs which ultimately leads to acute respiratory failure and death in affected cats. This is a life-threatening problem, causing death in a majority of patients despite life saving efforts and treatment.
During the first 2-4 days of infection, your cat may have a fever, less energy than usual, and decreased appetite. Symptoms tend to progress quickly to weakness or paralysis of the legs, seizures, difficulty breathing, hypersalivation (too much saliva) due to difficulty swallowing, and abnormal behavior.
Your kitten will need two sets of vaccinations to get them started – their first set at nine weeks old and a second booster set at three months old. After this, kittens and cats usually need `booster` vaccinations once a year. Until your kitten is fully vaccinated (and neutered), you should keep him or her inside.
What about serious side effects? Serious side effects from vaccines are extremely rare. For example, if 1 million doses of a vaccine are given, 1 to 2 people may have a severe allergic reaction.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Multiple symptoms following vaccination of 12 year old male cat, 15 pounds. Hard swallowing, occasional head twitch, decrease in appetite and urine.
ANSWER : A. You should discuss this with the vet which vaccinated him. The symptoms you report are unusual after vaccination and more so if the vaccine is more than 7-10days previous but symptoms of difficulty swallowing and reduced appetite/thirst/urination in an older cat should be investigated regardless; blood and urine tests may be required to rule out internal causes. Your vet can contact the vaccine company if there is any link

Q. Male neutered cat [1 1/2 years old] has just started trying to spray everywhere around the house. Nothing is coming out. No recent changes.
ANSWER : A. Changes in urinary habits can be caused by a number of things, especially in neutered male cats. Attempting to urinate or have accidents in places other than the litter box can often be a sign of a urinary tract infection, or crystals and debris in the bladder causing problems. Pets may need to go more frequently, may dribble or urinate in small amounts more often, may have accidents or may have blood-tinged or cloudy urine.Infections are usually treated with medications and changes to the diet, however in some cases of large stones or crystals surgery may be needed.

Male cats can also experience urinary blockage. This is due to a unique anatomical part or the urethra that forms a U-shape before exiting the body in male cats. If a cat has crystals or other debris in the urine, it can block at this point preventing urine from being able to exit. Cats may attempt to urinate without producing anything, may become very vocal (indicating pain) or may have a hunched back, full abdomen or pain in the abdomen (protecting the very full bladder). Urinary blockage IS a medical emergency so if suspected, your vet or local emergency clinic should be contacted immediately. Treatment usually involves a hospital stay and catheterization of the bladder to remove the blockage and allow urine to drain followed by medications and a change in diet to prevent further problems.

It is best to try and collect a sample of urine and make an appointment for your cat if he has had a change in urinary habits. If you do suspect a blockage, then contact your vet ASAP is best.

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. I found a large amount of pee from my unfixed male cat and it had blood in it. I notice later what looked similar to crystals in the same puddle. Help
ANSWER : A. You should have your cat examined and a urinalysis done immediately. Some cats do form crystals in their urine which leads to bladder inflammation,look in the urine, pain and in creased frequency of urination. The specific problem with male cats is the narrow width of the urethra through which the urine passes. Make cats have a very narrow urethra unlike female cats. The crystals, blood and other “sludge” that forms in the bladder when a cat has cystitis can cause a blockage in male cats and this is an emergency. A urinalysis can determine the extent of the problem and allow your vet to recommend appropriate treatment before it becomes an emergency. Your cat should be seen today.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Blood in Cat Urine

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. Does an indoor cat need to be vaccinated every year?
ANSWER : A. In practice, I recommend a feline combo vaccine every year, but will generally start administering every 3 years once they have had their kitten vaccines and 2 additional yearly vaccines. Rabies, is required yearly by law, and if kept up to date can be good for up to three years also. Based on the age of your cat I would give a yearly feline combo and rabies, and then boost the combo again next year.