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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. At one year, she is right in the middle of canine adolescence which is when new fears can show up. She needs positive reinforcement and luring to teach her leash walking is a good thing. You can take some special, tasty treats that she doesn’t get regularly for leash walking time only. Use these treats to lure her forward a little bit at a time. Don’t pull or force her or it will become a big, negative experience to only reinforce her discomfort. Keep it light, positive, and fun. You will likely only get a short distance the first few days, but within a few weeks you should be able to increase that and help her overcome her fear about it.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Other Possible Reasons Why Your Dog Doesn`t Want To Walk

Your pooch is fatigued or tired. It`s too hot or cold outside for your dog. Your dog`s walking gear (leash, collar) is uncomfortable for them. They want to keep walking more.

Pretty much, he does it when he wants attention, which is all the time. Sometimes, this behavior can be sweet or funny. It can make you want to engage with your dog or make you feel more affectionate. It can also help you know when your dog needs something.
Place something on the floor that your dog would really like to get to, such as a toy. If your dog pulls on the lead to get towards the toy, stop and call them towards you. Their reward for walking on a loose lead is getting to the toy. This way, the dog learns that pulling just slows things down.
A few of the most common reasons include fatigue, pain, or simply a lack of experience walking on a leash. Some dogs also stop walking because they don`t want to go back home yet! No matter the reason your dog is stopping during walks, you`ll need to remain patient.
If they suddenly stop wanting to go for walks, you should have them checked for medical issues, such as arthritis, dementia or fatigue that comes with old age. If they get checked out and are physically and mentally sound to take walks, use the same methods as you would for puppies and be consistent.
This is another question to ask yourself before knowing when to let your dog go. Most often, weakness and inability to move freely are clear signs that the animal needs urgent medical help or has declined to the point that it`s time to consider euthanasia or putting your dog to sleep.
If the dog has not been leash trained before, the sight, smell and feel of the leash and collar could be frightening or make the dog nervous, which can lead to resistance or balking. A dog that has been cooped up may be overly excited to go out on the leash, which can lead to more pulling or ignoring commands.
Lead Walking Training

Hold the lead in your left hand and treats in your right hand. Use the treats to lure your dog round to your right-hand side so they are standing, facing the same direction as you. The lead should be crossing over your body and held loosely with your left hand only. Feed them a treat.

The symptoms of depression will vary depending on the individual dog and the severity of the problem. There are some key things to look out for, however, including changes in body language during their interactions with people and other pets, decreased appetite, and lethargic behavior.
If you`re walking or playing with your dog and he slows down—for example, he chases after a ball more slowly or lags behind you as you walk—it`s a sign he`s too tired and it`s time to take a break or stop altogether, says Coates.
Great Pyrenees Like To Roam

And those instincts are deeply engrained into the Great Pyrenees DNA. Due to this instinctual behavior, Great Pyrenees aren`t the best breed for someone who wants a dog who can go for a walk off-leash, or go on hiking trails while doing the perfect heel.

They need mental stimulation for their well being – this is another part of their nature. If your dog is bored, she is much more likely to want to escape the yard or pasture as a means of something to do. If you have a pet Great Pyrenees as a pet, it is imperative that you interact with your dog A LOT!
Most (non-LGD) dog breeds only take about a year to 16 months to mature. Great Pyrenees generally take around 2 years, and some LGD breeds, such as the Spanish Mastiff, may take up to 4 years to mature. This means that your dog will remain a baby for a long, long time. Think about that for a minute.
When you`re training your Great Pyrenees to not bite, you need to be firm and you need to show her that biting means the fun ends and she doesn`t get attention. Never yell, scream at, or hit your puppy for biting.
Great Pyrenees are notorious for being terrified of thunderstorms, fireworks, and any (as we like to call them), angry sky noises. Not to mention, they are stubborn, opinionated—and huge.
Some breeds of dogs, including poodles, Siberian huskies, Chesapeake Bay retrievers, Great Pyrenees, German shorthaired pointers, border collies and Bernese mountain dogs, are more likely to develop anxiety.
You can absolutely leash train an older dog. The process may take a little bit longer since you`ll likely be undoing some bad leash manners your pup probably picked up along the way, but leash training an older dog just takes a bit more patience.
“Puppies are really easy and can probably be fully leash-trained in a month,” Novack says, but also cautions to be wary of the `teenage` phase that dogs go through at around nine months old. “When they hit adolescence, they`re going to pretend they`ve never learned anything.
You always need to teach your dog that coming to you is fun and rewarding. Instead of giving your dog the opportunity to run away, keep him on a collar or harness and leash and only let him off in a safe and inclosed area. Work on recalling your dog diligently in enclosed spaces before ever letting your dog off-leash!
While most people associate training with puppies, the reality is that dogs can learn at any age. Adult dogs are often easier to train than young puppies because they have more self-control. It`s also important to keep training your dog as it matures.
Make use of the `leave` command

Be sure to use this if your dog starts pulling when they see another dog — as soon as your dog spots them, give the `leave` command, then engage your dog with a reward in your right hand, such as a piece of kibble or simply some praise.

When a dog pulls on its leash, it restricts blood flow to its eyes and ears. When blood flow is cut off on a regular basis, it causes swelling, and constant swelling damages your dogs organs and appendages. Dog collars can damage the nerves in your dog`s front legs.
Stop walking when the lead starts to tighten

Teach your dog that walking next to you with a loose lead means they get to move forward – and pulling means they don`t. The second the lead starts to tighten, stop walking. Stand still, keep quiet and don`t move forward again until the lead is slack.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 1 year old great Pyrenees will not walk on the leash she stops and jumps around on the leash and when I try to walk her she just sits down.
ANSWER : A. At one year, she is right in the middle of canine adolescence which is when new fears can show up. She needs positive reinforcement and luring to teach her leash walking is a good thing. You can take some special, tasty treats that she doesn’t get regularly for leash walking time only. Use these treats to lure her forward a little bit at a time. Don’t pull or force her or it will become a big, negative experience to only reinforce her discomfort. Keep it light, positive, and fun. You will likely only get a short distance the first few days, but within a few weeks you should be able to increase that and help her overcome her fear about it.

Q. How can I train my 4 month old puppy to sit?
ANSWER : A. Training basic commands such as sit is very easy using a positive reinforcement method and does not require any more materials than a place to sit and some very yummy treats! When beginning to teach your dog new tricks, starting off in a distraction free area (such as a quiet room in the house) is best. The training can then expand to more distracting places once your dog has the hang of things.

Start by showing your dog a tasty treat and placing it over his or her nose. When they begin to sniff at the treat, gently move the treat backward. Most dogs will follow the treat with their head, and the backward motion will cause their back ends to sit down! Once your dog sits, reward with the treat and some praise. If your dog tends to walk backwards instead of sit, doing this technique against a wall will prevent your dog from walking backward and encourage sitting.

Once your dog has done this a few times, begin to add the word “sit” every time you put the treat above your dog’s head. Only say the word once, and then continue with the luring motion. Your dog will begin to associate the word with the action after several tries! After this, you can begin to attempt to offer the word “sit” once, and if your dog does so, reward with a treat and praise! If your dog forgets, or appears bored, stop training and try again at a later time- most puppies only have an attention span of a few minutes at most!

Q. What’s the best way to train a dog to use a lead again?
ANSWER : A. It depends on how serious your issue is. If you need to start from scratch: Bring out the leash, place it on the ground. Click and treat your dog. Say his name, work on attention, click and treat for attention. Work with the cheese sticks, or with some chicken.. something stinky, soft, and high value. Allow him to sniff the leash, praise him, click, treat, click, treat. Pick up the leash, click treat him. Hook the leash to his collar and allow the leash to drag, click treat him. Have him just follow you around, click and treat him to hold his attention.

Then, pick up the leash, click and treat him. Then drop the leash again, click and treat. Take baby steps. Then, hold the leash while you take a step, click and treat him for following. Open the front door, click and treat him. Then, take off the leash, click and treat him, and end training.

Pick training back up in an hour, and do the same exact thing from start to finish, only this time, “finish” will be you two going outside, you clicking and treating him a bunch, and then you bringing him back inside. Work your way up slowly. You can’t expect to just bring him outside and bring him on a walk right away.

When outdoors, use a front hooking harness like the Sensible/Sensation harnesses: http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness / http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness. These harnesses will eliminate the pulling power of your pup in a positive way. This will put you in control without the use of force. Carry high value treats with you everywhere, and offer them for good walking behavior – treats like white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks, hotdogs, all cut into tiny little pieces. The more you work on walking on-leash/attention indoors, the better it will be outdoors, remember that.

Q. My puppy refuses to walk outside on the leash. This only happens when we’re outside… Is it stubbornness or fear?
ANSWER : A. It is never stubbornness. Dogs are not stubborn, they can’t be. Dogs do not generalize well, and dogs display fearful behavior that appears to be stubbornness. Absolutely NEVER force this dog to walk outside when he is uncomfortable with doing so.. the more you force him to do it, opposition reflex – the more he will resist. The more he resists and is forced into it, the less he learns about being comfortable, and the more he becomes fearful of you and of the situation.

What you can do is carry extremely high value treats outside with you. Things like cooked white meat chicken, cooked fish, turkey pepperoni, turkey bacon, diced ham, mozzarella cheese sticks – all cut up into tiny little pea-sized pieces. You can also use peanut butter in a squeeze tube. First, put on the leash indoors and begin feeding him the treats. Help him make positive associations with having the leash put on. Then, take the leash off, and start over in 10min. Put the leash on, feed treats, walk to the door, open the door, feed treats, close door, take off leash. Start over in 10min. Put on leash, feed treats, go to door, feed treats, open door, feed treats, go outside, feed tons of treats and praise. Keep Titus in his comfort zone. If he doesn’t want to go far, just feed him tons of treats where he IS comfortable going. Make sure everything is calm/happy/positive. I bet in a week of doing this, he will be happy with walk further and further all of the time. If ever he is uncomfortable, feed him lots of treats for being a brave boy, and then turn around and go back home. It’s all about keeping him in his comfort zone.. it’s all about remaining within his threshold and never forcing him to feed uncomfortable.

This is very common for puppies. The world is scary! It’s brand new to them, and it’s up to you to make their interactions and discoveries positive, happy, calm, and to never force them into anything.

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. What is the best way to make my 9 month old Golden Retriever stop jumping on people?
ANSWER : A. There are a couple of things you can do. First off, try ignoring your puppy completely until all four paws are on the floor. Once your pup has settled a bit, you may reward with petting/praise. If your pup jumps up again when you begin to give her attention, immediately stop, turn around, cross your arms, and ignore.

Another thing you can do is teach an “off” command. This command is a PREVENTATIVE ONLY command. This means you never say “off” AFTER your pup has jumped, only BEFORE your pup has the chance to jump. To teach this, you place a piece of food on a table/chair/counter. As your pup approaches the table/chair/counter, you swoop your hands in front of her face and say, “off” then immediately reward with a treat FROM YOUR HAND. Practice this for weeks before you decide to use it as a preventative before she jumps up onto you.

Remember to tell all guests they need to ignore your puppy until she settles as well. This is key.

Q. How do I teach my dog to sit still enough and not move his head while I clip on the gentle leader?
ANSWER : A. Most dogs HATE the gentle leader, and it’s not at all surprising. Would you want something foreign on your face? It’s an uncomfortable training tool, and no dog enjoys wearing it. If you are looking to have your dog behave better on-leash, you should consider tossing out that gentle leader, and using a front hooking harness like the Sensible http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness, or the Sensation http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness harness. These harnesses will eliminate the pulling power of your dog, and put you in control in a positive, and gentle way. Any time your dog pulls, he is redirected until he is facing you. You can practically walk your dog with your pinky.

I dislike the gentle leader because it can cause neck injuries in an avid puller/lunger. You also can’t ever hook a long-lead to the gentle leader and allow your dog to run around because it would break his neck. Another thing I dislike about it, is it discourages sniffing the ground during walks. When your dog attempts to sniff, and the leash is short, his nose is redirected upwards. When you trip on the leash, the head is jerked around and the nose is directed upwards. Sniffing during walks is extremely important. Sniffing = mental stimulation, which will tire your dog out more during your walks. The more your dog lags, or forges, the less he can sniff the ground, and the more frustrated he becomes.

If you’re dead set on using the head halti.. you should be using treats to hold his attention. Place the head halti on the floor, reward him for sniffing it, pick it up, treat him, put it near his face, treat him, lure his nose through the loop, lots of treats, take the head halti off, more treats, lure his nose through again, more treats. Take baby steps going forwards AND backwards so the “game” of getting the halti on isn’t always getting more difficult.

Q. What can I do to help our Lab stop pulling on the leash when we go for a walk? I have tried different techniques but after 2 1/2 years she still pulls
ANSWER : A. POST TWO:
In the mean-time, while you’re working on building up that attention indoors, you should be using a front hooking harness outdoors on your walks. This will eliminate your girls pulling power. The Sensible http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ible-harness and the Sensation http://www.softouchconcepts.com/index.php/product-53/sense-ation-harness harness are the best front hooking harnesses on the market because they do not have the martingale loop on the front of the harness (which can cause the dog to yo-yo during walks).

Lastly, I’d just like to add that dogs sniff the ground during walks for added mental stimulation. If your dog isn’t allowed to sniff the ground, the walk isn’t nearly as fun or tiring. When you are practicing attention on your walks, make sure it’s in short, small bursts. Attention for a few steps, back to sniffing for several steps, attention for a few steps, sniffing for a few minutes.. etc.