Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. I always recommend to remove any lump because even if they are benign they can grow massively causing pain or they can change behavior at any point and be malignant even with fatty benign lumps. Please don’t let the lumps grow, could be too late.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Fibrosarcomas usually appear as a single, sometimes nodular, firm lump or bump on or under the skin, which at times may open (ulcerate), bleed, and become infected. When there is more than one, they are usually in the same area. Whether single or multiple, there may be swelling of the affected area and pain.
Bumps that grow and then shrink again: These bumps may be a type of tumor called a mast cell tumor that contains granules of histamine. As histamine is released, they will swell, and as the release subsides, they will shrink again.
Westies face many joint problems including loose knees (luxating patella), hip dysplasia, swollen jaw (craniomandibular osteopathy) and hipbone atrophy (Legg-Calve-Perthes disease).
Fibromas occur in all breeds but are primarily a tumor of aged dogs. Doberman Pinschers, Boxers, and Golden Retrievers are most at risk. The head and legs are the most likely sites. Fibromas appear as isolated, generally raised, often hairless lumps originating under the skin surface.
Most solitary fibrous tumors are not cancerous. They don`t spread to other parts of the body. Rarely, they can be cancerous, also known as malignant. Solitary fibrous tumors tend to grow slowly.
It can occur in the connective tissue of any part of the body; however, it is most common in the pleura. Solitary fibrous tumors of the pleura (SFTP) are a persistent painless mass with slow growth. With the increase of the tumor, there will be corresponding compression symptoms.
It depends on how aggressive or advanced the particular cancer is. By the time it`s detected, some dogs will live weeks to months, while others will live for years. Lymphoma patients, for instance, can live several years.
One may feel firm, raised wart-like blemishes that are squamous cell carcinoma. One may see rubber-like, inflamed sores that are mast cell tumors. Melanomas can look like strange-colored lumps or bumps on the lips, mouth, pads of feet, or toenail beds. Dog owners may see other pain symptoms, such as limps.
The Westie dog breed, which has an average lifespan of 12 to 14 years, may be prone to minor health problems like Keratoconjunctivitis Sicca (KCS), copper toxicosis, patellar luxation, and cataract, and major problems such as Legg-Perthes Disease, Craniomandibular Osteopathy (CMO), globoid cell leukodystrophy, and skin …
This medical condition usually affects dogs between the ages of nine and twelve. Gender is associated with this condition as well, with male dogs being more prone to fibrosarcoma than females. If treated, a dog can continue to have a life span of up to 36 months, versus five months, if left untreated.
Of submitted samples, 20% to 40% are reported to be malignant. The most common malignant skin tumors in dogs are mast cell tumors, soft tissue sarcomas, and squamous cell carcinomas. The most common benign canine skin and subcutaneous benign tumors include lipomas, histiocytomas, and perianal gland adenomas.
Most lumps and bumps are benign (non-cancerous), but some of them can be malignant (cancerous). The older your dog is, the higher their chance of getting malignant lumps. The good news is that early detection and treatment of cancerous lumps can increase the chances of a cure.
Fibroadenomas are solid, smooth, firm, noncancerous (benign) lumps that are most commonly found in women in their 20s and 30s. They are the most common benign lumps in women and can occur at any age. They are increasingly being seen in postmenopausal women who are taking hormone therapy.
Fibrosis occurs when the synthesis of new collagen by myofibroblasts exceeds the rate at which it is degraded, such that the total amount of collagen increases over time.
Dermatofibroma is the most common painful tumor of the skin.
Benign tumors may be large enough to detect, particularly if they`re close to the skin. However, most aren`t large enough to cause discomfort or pain. They can be removed if they are. Lipomas, for example, may be large enough to detect, but are generally soft, movable, and painless.
Cancerous lumps are tumours and growths that develop most commonly in the skin, digestive system and the breast in female dogs. Some lumps and bumps will be benign, such as lipoma, whilst others, such as mast cell tumours and carcinomas are malignant – cancerous.
Skin squamous cell carcinoma is the most commonly diagnosed form of skin cancer in dogs. These tumors appear as raised wart-like patches or lumps that are firm to the touch and are most often found on the dog`s head, lower legs, rear, and abdomen.
The last few days before your dog passes you may notice: extreme weight loss, a distant look in their eyes, a lack of interest in anything, restlessness or unusual stillness, a change in the way that your dog smells, and a changed temperament.
As many as 50% of pets die of cancer. An estimated 6,000,000 dogs and nearly 6,000,000 cats will be diagnosed with cancer this year. In many of these animals, the malignancy will look and behave much as it would in humans, such as spreading to the same organs.
Mast cell tumors are quite serious when identified in dogs. If untreated they can cause anaphylactic shock or if they progress into a more aggressive form they can metastasize and ultimately lead to death.
In dogs, the most common type of malignant skin cancer is a mast cell tumor. These tumors are superficial lumps that can be painful. They often swell, frequently bleed and then scab over, only to bleed again a few days later. They should not be squeezed by the owner, as squeezing can make them swell even more.
They may advise you to keep a watchful eye on it and bring your pup in for a biopsy if the lump continues past three months, is more than an inch in diameter, or continues to grow or change shape.
While all West Highland Terries are affectionate, loyal and responsive breeds, some Westies prefer constant cuddles more than others — and will love curling up on your lap at the end of the day.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 10 year old west highland Terrier had a lump confirmed as fibrous four years ago and no harm. It is getting bigger. Is this normal?
ANSWER : A. I always recommend to remove any lump because even if they are benign they can grow massively causing pain or they can change behavior at any point and be malignant even with fatty benign lumps. Please don’t let the lumps grow, could be too late.

Read Full Q/A … : Pet 27 by reec – issuu

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. My cocker spaniel is 9 years old. He has involuntary bowel movements (little drops) very frequently, especially when he is asleep.
ANSWER : A. Is your dog on a senior dog food? I would get your dog on a high quality high protien dog food. Ask a pet store assosicate or your regular vet for a food recommendation. When you buy a better food the dog will have to eat less to get the same amount of energy from the food. The dog has to eat more of the cheaper foods to get the energy it needs from it. Meaning more poop and buying more food. So the cost really evens out. So the lessen your dogs bowel movements get on a better senior dog food. Next talk to your vet they may have a recommendation. If you switch dogs do it slowly by mixing the foods. Start with 10% new 90% old mixed for at least a week until you have switched to 100% new 0% old. Senior foods have more fiber to help with bowel movements. Take the dog outside to go potty more frequently, right before bed time.

Read Full Q/A … : Symptoms Questions & Answers

Q. I have a Peagle who is 3 years old. He eats everything in sight. I have noticed about a week ago that he has a lump in his lower abdomen. He is overwe
ANSWER : A. It’s often difficult to tell whether lumps, if what you’re talking about is actually inside the abdomen, are normal or not. A vet is trained to “palpate” or feel the abdomen and discern the individual organs, and whether they feel abnormal or not. There are many structures in there, from kidneys to the liver to lymph node. It takes quite a bit of training to know what a “normal” abdomen feels like.

If you’re talking about a lump you’re feeling under the skin, this could be something benign or malignant. Hopefully it’s nothing serious, but it’s best to get it checked out. And you should be aware that a ravenous appetite can be the sign of some hormonal diseases, although I’ve also known a lot of Beagles (which is sounds like is half of what makes up your dog) who were ravenous eaters, so he may be prone to overeating. Your vet can also determine if he’s overweight and give you diet and exercise tips for him.

Q. Small lump on my dog’s throat, what should I do?
ANSWER : A. Lumps and bumps on the throat or neck can be caused by a wide range of things. Depending on the lumps size, if it is under the skin or appears on the skin itself, and its location on the throat can all indicate different things.

There are a large number of structures in the neck there ranging from thyroid glands, nerves, salivary glands and even lymph nodes. Illness, disease or irritation can all cause swelling or issues there. You may also see additional symptoms such as trouble swallowing, drooling, lethargy or changes in weight and appetite to help narrow down the cause of the lump. Testing via blood work or an X-ray may help to determine the cause and proper treatment.

Lumps and bumps on the skin can also be caused by allergies such as an allergic reaction or sting, or even an abscess under the skin. Allergies are usually treated with an allergy medication to help stop the response and any itching or redness. Abscesses (cuts or scrapes that get infected and swell with fluid) are usually hot or painful to the touch and may ooze debris. These are usually drained at a vet, and then treated with antibiotics.

If the cause of the lump is not known, your vet may also recommend taking a sample of the lump to send to a Lab. This can help to determine what exactly is causing the lump and how to treat it.

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. Does an indoor cat need to be vaccinated every year?
ANSWER : A. In practice, I recommend a feline combo vaccine every year, but will generally start administering every 3 years once they have had their kitten vaccines and 2 additional yearly vaccines. Rabies, is required yearly by law, and if kept up to date can be good for up to three years also. Based on the age of your cat I would give a yearly feline combo and rabies, and then boost the combo again next year.

Q. My 10 yr old Lab has a fatty lump the size of a small football on the inside of his rear leg. What can we do?
ANSWER : A. Lumps and bumps are very common in older dogs, and Lipomas (or fatty tumors) tend to be the most common in older dogs. However, if you are unsure of the exact type of lump that is present on your Lab, your first step is to have it examined by your vet. Your vet can take a sample of the lump to send to a laboratory for analysis to make sure it is not something more serious such as cancer.

If the lump is just a lipoma, treatment really depends on if it is affecting your dog (or you) at all. Lipomas tend to be benign and do not need removal unless they are bothersome to your pet or yourself. However, if they are, the usual treatment is to have the lump surgically removed. This usually removes the tumor completely, but in some cases, the lipoma may regrow in the same spot.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Limping in Dogs