on.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. This is possibly a normal reaction of his body when sitting in a position for a long period of time. The blood flow is probably not as good when your pet has bended elbows and joints when sitting, and it take a bit of a stretch when rising to get the bloodflow back to normal in the joint. This is no cause for alarm.
As long as your pet is not having other signs of joint problems such as limping, crying out in pain, non-weight bearing on a limb, then no need to see a vet at this point.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Causes of Stiffness and Inflammation in Dogs

Stiffness is frequently triggered by diseases that are typically associated with age such as arthritis and dysplasia, but infestations of parasites or viral or bacterial infections can also cause both inflammation and stiffness.

If your dog has trouble standing up or sitting down, you might suspect natural, age-related changes such as osteoarthritis. However, for many dogs, the actual problem lies with an inherited condition known as hip dysplasia. Canine hip dysplasia can cause pain and stiffness in the hip joints at any stage of life.
If your dog is older or had a leg injury in the past, it`s possible they`ve developed arthritis in their joints. This just means that they`re a little more stiff than normal and it can take them some time to feel confident on walking on their arthritic limb after a long nap.
The Common Signs of Arthritis in Dogs Are:

Stiffness is probably the most universally known symptom of arthritis in dogs, but there`s other signs such as “bunny hopping” and licking certain joints. Here are the most common signs of arthritis in dogs: Walking stiffly. Rising slower, especially on the morning.

Stiff joints are often the result of increased wear and tear. The cartilage of the joint can wear away quicker than it can be replaced. This leads to pain and stiffness and eventually bony changes within the joint which can seriously affect the cat or dog`s mobility.
Contact your vet if you notice your dog is limping or appears stiff. Contact your vet immediately if your dog is in severe pain, is unable to put a leg down or has a serious wound. You know your dog best. If they don`t have the symptoms listed above but you are still concerned it`s always best to contact your vet.
Dogs can start to show signs of arthritis as early as 1 year of age. According to the Vet Times (pdf), the degenerative joint condition can be found in 20% of dogs before their first year and 80% of more senior dogs at or over age 8.
Glucosamine and chondroitin are two common joint supplement ingredients that are used in both humans and dogs. These supplements work by reducing inflammation, promoting healing, and increasing water retention in the cartilage, which provides more cushioning for the joint.
This period is called the pre-ictal phase, or aura. In a generalized or tonic-clonic seizure, the dog will typically be seen to suddenly fall on his side. The legs will first become stiff and this stiffening is often followed by rhythmic/jerky paddling motions. The head is often held back with the neck extended.
Dogs who have hip dysplasia may sway back and forth when they walk. They may also have a bunny-hopping gait or may stand flat on their back feet. All of these potential gait issues are related to the pain they feel when they suffer from hip dysplasia.
The main orthopedic cause of hind-limb weakness in dogs is chronic joint inflammation/pain (osteoarthritis, degenerative joint disease). While the arthritis itself is obviously painful, it is frequently accompanied by muscle aches and pains, called compensatory pain.
Many dog parents find themselves asking the question, “Can arthritis in dogs come on suddenly?” The symptoms of arthritis in dogs often start slowly and get worse over time. Dog parents may miss the early stages of the disease when their four-legged friends are experiencing only a small amount of discomfort.
What are the typical signs of pain in dogs? General behaviour: Shaking, flattened ears, low posture, aggression, grumpy temperament, panting or crying, excessive licking or scratching a specific area, reluctant to play, interact or exercise, lameness (limping), stiffness after rest, loss of appetite.
Weakness in back legs of dogs can be caused by a variety of things, including myasthenia gravis, heart problems, anemia, hypothyroidism, and Addison`s disease.
A dog`s inability to walk is typically due to either a problem with the dog`s joints or issues with his spinal cord. Arthritis is probably the most common reason for a dog`s inability to walk. It often develops with age, but can even occur in very young dogs.
But don`t mistake his easygoing personality for low energy: The Lab is an enthusiastic athlete that requires lots of exercise, like swimming and marathon games of fetch, to keep physically and mentally fit.
The most common causes of lethargy in dogs are: Infection, including parvovirus, distemper, kennel cough and leptospirosis. Metabolic diseases, such as heart problems, liver problems, diabetes, and hypoglycaemia. Medications, such as newly prescribed drugs or a new flea or worm product.
Neuropathy is often mistaken for arthritis, however, both conditions can be present at the same time. Weakness in the hind legs is a common sign of neuropathies.
A dog with arthritis is always stiff when getting up. Help a dog loosen up with a short, low-impact walk. A minute or two of walking and moving about can loosen its muscles and joints. Then, they can start to move a little faster.
Does he appear stiff in the morning or perhaps even limps? If so, there`s a good chance your dog has arthritis, also called osteoarthritis or degenerative bone disease. The Arthritis Founadation conservatively reports one in five dogs suffer from this chronic joint pain condition.
Spondylosis deformans is a condition that affects the vertebral bones of the spine and is characterized by the presence of bony spurs or osteophytes along the edges of the bones of the spine.
The word ataxia means incoordination within the nervous system. The abnormal movement can occur in the legs, the head, the torso, or all three. There are several different forms of ataxia, depending on where in the nervous system the abnormality occurs.
Do Labradors Need Hip And Joint Supplements? The larger the breed of dog you have, the earlier you should consider supplementation. Labs, in particular, are prone to more severe joint problems. Many veterinarians recommend supplementation for Labs as soon as they stop growing or as early as 12 months old.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 11 month lab seems to be stiff at times when first getting up from sitting or laying down. I have been buying him beef rib bones to chew on.
ANSWER : A. This is possibly a normal reaction of his body when sitting in a position for a long period of time. The blood flow is probably not as good when your pet has bended elbows and joints when sitting, and it take a bit of a stretch when rising to get the bloodflow back to normal in the joint. This is no cause for alarm.
As long as your pet is not having other signs of joint problems such as limping, crying out in pain, non-weight bearing on a limb, then no need to see a vet at this point.

Q. How can I train my 4 month old puppy to sit?
ANSWER : A. Training basic commands such as sit is very easy using a positive reinforcement method and does not require any more materials than a place to sit and some very yummy treats! When beginning to teach your dog new tricks, starting off in a distraction free area (such as a quiet room in the house) is best. The training can then expand to more distracting places once your dog has the hang of things.

Start by showing your dog a tasty treat and placing it over his or her nose. When they begin to sniff at the treat, gently move the treat backward. Most dogs will follow the treat with their head, and the backward motion will cause their back ends to sit down! Once your dog sits, reward with the treat and some praise. If your dog tends to walk backwards instead of sit, doing this technique against a wall will prevent your dog from walking backward and encourage sitting.

Once your dog has done this a few times, begin to add the word “sit” every time you put the treat above your dog’s head. Only say the word once, and then continue with the luring motion. Your dog will begin to associate the word with the action after several tries! After this, you can begin to attempt to offer the word “sit” once, and if your dog does so, reward with a treat and praise! If your dog forgets, or appears bored, stop training and try again at a later time- most puppies only have an attention span of a few minutes at most!

Q. How can I keep my 14 year old Yorkie from snapping at the younger ones?
ANSWER : A. It’s all about management. Do not allow the 7yo’s to interact with your 14yo unsupervised. You should be there each time they interact so you can redirect the 14yo’s attention onto some toys, or onto some treats when the 7yo’s are around. It sounds like you need to help your 14yo make positive associations with being around the younger pups. You should be trying to feed him treats each time he interacts with them, and doesn’t snap at them. Pet and praise him each time he is around them, or any time they are near. As I said, keep the separated when you cannot supervise their interactions because if you aren’t around when he is snapping at them, you could end up with a fight on your hands.

It could also be that they spend too much time together. Imagine spending 100% of your time with somebody, day in and out, doing everything together… including going to the bathroom.. that might bother anybody. I think you should give them more time apart from each other. Take them all on separate walks, separate them to play with them individually, separate them when you take them to potty, separate feeding times in separate rooms, etc. This can help alleviate the stress your older dog is feeling due to living closely with other dogs. You should always be giving individual activities in a houseful of dogs anyway.. when you expect them to get along 100% of the time, that’s when you find trouble.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. I have a 5 mo. kitten. She has a problem with teething, chews on my fingers and nose. I tell her “No” & got to the point were I am bopping. Help!
ANSWER : A. 5-7 months is typically the age cats and dogs will begin to get their adult teeth. This can be a troublesome time as cats may want to chew on things to help relieve their gums from soreness and pain. If your kitten is very mouthy, providing lots of soft toys she can bite and play with will help redirect the behavior to appropriate objects. A chewy treat or even a small piece of ice cube can help to soothe and numb sore gums! If she begins to get mouthy with you, stop the play session, get up and walk away. She will quickly learn that chewing on you means she doesn’t get to have fun! Luckily, most kittens will outgrow this behavior once their adult teeth are in!

Q. How do I FINALLY rid all 4 of my cats of tapeworms after 2 years of dealing with it? Fleas seem to be controlled. I know they are the vector.
ANSWER : A. If your cats keep getting tapeworms, then they are picking up fleas from somewhere. Fleas will hitch a ride on your pant leg from outside.

Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

You can also use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the life cycle.

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Q. My cat is excessively scrstching herself., to the point she has sores. She is strictly an indoor cat. Did have flees been treated for 2 months
ANSWER : A. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home environment. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard too, since fleas are opportunistic and will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet to have it present. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way as borax. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

You might want to consider boarding your pet for the day at your vet, to give you the opportunity to flea bomb your house without having to worry about your pet being exposed. They can bathe your pet and give a dose of Capstar while you treat your home.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.

Skin problems can have a variety of causes, sometimes more than one. It is important to have the problem checked by your vet to determine if there is a medical cause for your pet’s skin issues and treat accordingly.

In pets of all ages, fleas, food allergies and exposure to chemical irritants such as cleaners and soaps can be a cause. Any one of these may not be enough to trigger the breakouts, depending on how sensitive your pet is, but a combination can be enough to start the itch-scratch cycle. Finding out the cause and eliminating it is the best course of action. With flea allergies, if your pet is sensitive enough, a single bite can cause them to break out scratch enough to tear their skin.

Check for fleas with a flea comb. Look for fleas and/or tiny black granules, like coarse black pepper. This is flea feces, consisting of digested, dried blood. You may find tiny white particles, like salt, which are the flea eggs. Applying a good topical monthly flea treatment and aggressively treating your house and yard will help break the flea life cycle.

If you use plastic bowls, this is a possible cause for hair loss, though this tends to be on the chin, where their skin touches the bowl while they eat. If you suspect this to be the culprit, try changing the bowls to glass, metal or ceramic.

Food allergies are often caused by sensitivity to a protein in the food. Hill’s Science Diet offers some non-prescription options for sensitive skin as well as prescription hypoallergenic foods for more severe cases. Royal Canin carries limited protein diets that may also offer some relief. Your vet can recommend a specific diet that will help.

If there is no relief or not enough, consider getting your pet checked by a veterinary dermatologist and having allergy testing done.