Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. If he goes outside at all, he could have gotten a seed or blade of grass in his nasal passages, usually by chewing on a plant and then sneezing. This irritates the nasal passage, causing the bloody seepage. Other possibilities include injury, infection, polyp or other growths. I recommend getting him in to see your vet as soon as possible for an exam.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

One of the most common causes of nasal discharge is allergic rhinitis. This is a bit like hayfever and your pet may have a continuous clear fluid trickling from their nose. Other signs are not very common with allergic rhinitis although your pet may occasionally sneeze.
Epistaxis can be a symptom of a serious medical condition like cancer or organ failure. It is also commonly caused by sinus or respiratory infections or injuries to the nose or head. Nosebleeds can affect one or both nostrils, and this distinction can aid in diagnosing the underlying cause of the condition.
Based on the presence of bloody mucus, I suspect that your cat has colitis. There are several causes of feline colitis, such as intestinal parasites, infection with giardia (a protozoan parasite), inflammatory bowel disease, and stress colitis, to name a few.
• Nasal discharge has a wide variety of potential causes, including infection, inflammation, mites, tumors, or foreign objects trapped in the nasal passage. • Viral upper respiratory tract infections are one of the most common reasons for nasal discharge in cats.
The discharge may be clear or may become yellow/green in color. In addition to these typical symptoms, cats with a calicivirus infection often develop ulcers on the tongue, hard palate, gums, lips, or nose. These cats will usually salivate or drool excessively as the ulcers are very painful.
The use of a humidifier, a vaporizer, or the steam from a hot shower may help your cat breathe more easily. Gently wipe nasal discharge from your cat`s nostrils with a soft damp towel. Your cat may not be able to smell his/her food as well as before.
A nosebleed, meaning a loss of blood from the tissue that lines the inside of your nose, can occur in one or both nostrils. Usually, it only affects one nostril. Your nose has many tiny blood vessels in it. These vessels help warm and moisten the air you breathe.
picking your nose. blowing your nose very hard. a minor injury to your nose. changes in humidity or temperature causing the inside of the nose to become dry and cracked.
Discharge from the prepuce is often normal in males, as it is the body`s way of naturally self-cleaning. However, abnormally colored discharge and other significant irregularities in the male reproductive area can be caused by a number of underlying conditions such as: Infection (bladder infection, kidney infection)
Symptoms of Mucus in Cats

Mucus is clear in a healthy cat, but a cat with respiratory disease may have brown, reddish, green, or yellow mucus coming from the nose.

A runny or stuffed-up nose is the most common clinical sign in cats with chronic upper respiratory infections. The nasal discharge tends to be thick and often yellow.
Commonly observed clinical signs include sneezing, increased respiratory sounds, and nasal congestion. Affected cats may have trouble breathing. You may also notice decreased airflow through the nostrils if you place your hand in front of your cat`s nostrils or watch as they breathe onto a piece of glass.
Feline Stomatitis is a very painful condition. Frequently, the pain is so severe that your cat will not want to eat. Other common signs of stomatitis include: Bright red, inflamed gums and oral mucosa that extends throughout the inner lining of the mouth and cheeks.
If your cat`s airways are sensitive to certain stimuli, exposure to those agents can cause an inflammatory response and your cat will experience bronchial (airway) spasms, increased mucus production, and possible accumulation of mucus in the airways.
When an adult has a nosebleed for no apparent reason, it could be related to medications, health conditions, or simply dry air. Nosebleeds are common, and while the cause may be unclear at first, most cases are minor and can be managed from home.
Gently pinch the nostrils closed for 5 to 10 minutes. Don`t stop pinching to check if bleeding has stopped. Run a cool mist humidifier in your child`s room at night, if the air in your home is dry. Teach your child not to pick his or her nose or blow it too hard.
It there is a prominent blood vessel on one side- or if the septum- (center wall of the nose) is deviated (twisted)- then there can be a prominent point on the wall that the air hits and dries out faster. Both of these will cause nose bleeds to be more common on one side.
Nosebleeds are a nuisance but rarely an emergency. There are some situations, however, when nosebleeds require immediate medical attention: Bleeding that does not stop in 30 minutes. Bleeding that is very heavy, pouring down the back of your throat and out the front of your nose.
Stress and anxiety are just one of the risk factors for nosebleeds. According to the Anxiety and Depression Association of America, over 40 million adults have an anxiety disorder, which means a higher chance for both recurring or spontaneous nosebleeds. While stress poses a risk, it`s not necessarily a direct cause.
What about high blood pressure and nosebleeds? There is no direct link between nosebleeds as a sign of high blood pressure – hypertension itself doesn`t cause nosebleeds unless there is a hypertensive crisis. However, the two do often happen in parallel.
Bleeding in cats can be from superficial wounds or indicative of a larger problem, and it often warrants a trip to your veterinarian.
The normal colour of the semen is creamy white and the intensity of the colour reflects the concentration of the spermatozoa. A yellow colour may be obtained with urinary contamination or the presence of pus, and red blood cells may also be detected.
Signs can include coughing, heavy breathing, wheezing, sneezing, poor appetite or anorexia, weight loss, fever, enlarged lymph nodes, and ocular or nasal discharge. “Signs may be more pronounced in kittens due to their immature immune system.”

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My cats nose is stopped up on antibiotics. She has a loss of appetite, acting normal though. Is 3 ounces of can food enough in 24h? 9 pound cat
ANSWER : A. Cats with stopped up noses tend to eat much less, as you’ve noted, because they can’t smell their food as well. And the smell of food is pretty important to a cat’s appetite. You can start by warming up the food in a microwave – not too hot, test it yourself by putting your finger right in the center, as the temperature of microwave food can vary – as this will intensify the smell and hopefully make your cat more interested.

Saline nose drops, like those that are used on little kids, are safe to use on a cat to clean the discharge that is dried around and in the nose. There’s a brand called Little Noses that’s available in the U.S. That I like. You can put it on a q-tip and try to remove the debris. Humidifying the air with a humidifier can help as well, or you can put the cat in the bathroom and run the shower enough to generate steam. Don’t use “real” nose drops like Neo-synephrine or anything else like that – cats quickly build up resistance to them.

A 3 oz can of food is an OK amount in 24 hours, but do try the techniques above to help your cat get more interested in food. You might also try some baby food – no garlic or onions in the ingredients – as cats usually really like the taste of it.

Q. Our cat of six years has on two separate occasions has defecated on the living room rug and recently pee’d on the skirt of the Christmas tree.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.

Q. My cat has a runny nose along with runny eyes. Should I worry?
ANSWER : A. Runny noses and eyes are common disorders in cats, and are usually a sign of an underlying condition. The most common one being an Upper Respiratory Infection.

This condition, also known as “cat flu”, is seen most often in kittens. It is caused by one of several viruses or bacteria and common symptoms include a runny nose, runny eyes, sneezing, wheezing and congestion.

In some cases, the discharge may change color to greenish or yellow, indicating a secondary infection. Cats that are in high stress environments or in contact with other cats are most likely to get URIs.

At home, be sure to keep your cat eating and drinking to prevent dehydration. You can also use a warm washcloth to remove any debris from the eyes or nose that is making seeing or breathing difficult.

Finally, keep in mind that if the symptoms continue for more than a day or two, the discharge becomes green or yellow, or your cat appears to be feverish or in distress, veterinary care should be sought without further delay.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. I have 6 cats, my 2 black, male, cats have small eruptions on the furry bridge area above & to the side of the nose. They dry and form crust scabs.
ANSWER : A. I do agree with the answer below that any time more than one animal in a household is affected with a skin condition we have to rule out contagious disease – even if not every animal in the house in infected. The changes you are describing to your cats’ noses definitely sound compatible with infectious diseases like ringworm and mites (mange). However, if your cats stay indoors and don’t have contact with cats outside of your other cats, and if none of your cats (not just the infected ones) came from a shelter recently it’s probably not something contagious.

I will add that I have seen non-affected cats that carry ringworm and pass it to other animals in the household, so if you have any new cats check for ringworm.

Once infectious causes have been ruled out you can think about strange things, like immune-mediated skin disease (lupus) and solar dermatitis. Diagnosing what exactly is causing the problem and how to treat it may require taking a biopsy from one or preferably both cats.

Q. Aggressive young cat attacking my other cat?
ANSWER : A. Aggression among cats can be a sign of stress, especially if one cat has just been introduced, or if the other cat is overly curious/friendly toward the scared one. The best first step is to make sure each cat has their own separate “spaces” where they can go to get away from harassment from the other cat. Up-high bedding, quiet rooms, etc can all help. Make sure each cat also has their own litter box and food/water bowls as cats often do not like to share and this can be a point of aggression between them. Lastly, placing pheromone diffusers or pheromone calming collars on one or both cats may help decrease stress and aggression through the use of cat calming pheromones. Fel-i-way is one of the most common brands.

Q. I have a cat that defecates in the litter box but always urinates outside the box. It is very annoying.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination in cats is often a behavioral problem rather than a medical problem, so the first step is to have him seen by your vet to eliminate any kind of illness or condition as a cause for his eliminating outside the box.

If medical issues are ruled out, take a look at other reasons. Has there been a lot of unusual activity? Has you cat been left at home or boarded? Is the litterbox in a busy area? Has anything happened recently in this area to make him reluctant to use it again? Is there another cat, pet or person that is preventing him from getting to the box? Have you changed it from a hooded to an open box, or vice versa? Is it big enough? Have you changed the type or brand of litter? Is there something attractive about the spot he uses? Cats dislike disturbances to their routine and may act out to express their dissatisfaction.

The general rule is one litter box per cat in the household, plus one. That way each cat can have a place of their own to go in case the box is occupied or another cat has claimed it as territory. They should be scooped daily, if not more often and changed completely weekly, washed with soap and water only. You can offer one kind of litter in one box and another kind in another to see if there is a preference. I don’t recommend the crystals, it makes a hissing sound when wet that startles some cats and make them reluctant to use it again. The litter boxes should be located in a quiet, low-traffic area so that the cat can use them in peace. Make sure any other pets or people aren’t giving them a hard time around or in the litter box. It may take some investigation and experimentation to find your cat’s preference and accommodate him so that everyone is satisfied with the situation. And, when cleaning up pet accidents, don’t use any cleaner containing ammonia. This leaves behind a scent similar to urine.