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Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. That sounds concerning. There could be an internal issue or kidney or bladder infection. She should be seen by a vet to determine cause.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

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Typically when there is blood in your dog`s urine, this is due to inflammation or infection in the urinary tract which could include the upper or lower urinary tract. However, it`s important to contact a veterinarian or emergency vet as soon as possible to rule out any serious medical issues.
The age and sex of a dog may give some clues as to what is causing the bleeding. A female dog peeing blood (but acting normal) is more likely to have a urinary tract infection or inflammation, whereas a male dog peeing blood (but acting normal) is more likely to have bladder stones or a prostate problem.
Most people do not stare at their dog as they pee, but if you happen to notice pink or red discoloration of their urine it is most likely blood. But don`t panic, a trip to the vet should sort it out. More than likely it is a urinary tract infection.
Typically, green urine indicates late-stage kidney failure, cancer of the kidneys, or extremely severe urinary tract infection. Urine may turn green because bilirubin makes its way into the kidneys, where it is not supposed to be.
Although they often affect older canines (ages 7 and up), younger pups can also develop UTIs. All breeds are susceptible, with females being more prone than males. (Male dogs have a longer urethra, so it takes bacteria longer to travel upwards.)
Dog UTI Symptoms

Straining to urinate – Dogs with a UTI might strain to pee and be unable to go at all. They may also arch their backs, cry, or whine when they try to go to the bathroom because of the pain. Blood in the urine – Blood or other discharge in the urine is a sure sign that something is up with your pup.

Many cases of blood in dog urine are caused by infections and can be successfully treated simply with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Other causes such as bladder stones may require surgical removal. If your dog has been diagnosed with urinary crystals, changing the diet to a prescription urinary diet can help.
Causes – Lower urinary tract bleeding

FLUTD has been linked to stress and anxiety. Prostate – the most common causes of bleeding from the prostate in an unneutered dog are prostatitis (infection) and benign hyperplasia.

Two of the most common reasons that blood might show up in your dog`s urine involve kidney and bladder issues like infections, stones, and other problems. IMPORTANT: It`s generally recommended that a dog with blood in their urine should be seen by a vet within 24 hours.
Potential causes of blood in dog urine include: Urinary tract infection (UTI) Kidney infection. Bladder stones.
Some of the earliest signs of kidney disease in dogs may include subtle weight loss, urinating/peeing more often and drinking a lot more water. Therefore, if you notice your dog is peeing on the floor or asking to go out more, or if your dog is always thirsty, it`s time to visit your veterinarian.
Symptoms of Kidney Failure in Dogs

Weight loss. Nausea and vomiting. Pale gums. Loss of balance, or stumbling.

Urinary Tract Infections, better known as a UTI, are extremely common in puppies. The puppy`s frequent urination and inability to control when and where he goes is often misinterpreted by pet owners as a behavioral problem.
Bacteria and other infection-causing microbes may enter the urinary tract when an infant has a dirty diaper or when babies are wiped from back to front. Good hydration enabling frequent urination and maintaining proper hygiene can help prevent UTIs.
Urinary tract infections (UTI) are a painful and potentially dangerous condition in dogs. Bloody urine, difficulty urinating, and licking of the area are all signs your dog might have a UTI.
Urinary tract infections, cystitis (bladder inflammation), bladder stones, kidney disease, or arthritis or age-related incontinence could all be causes of house soiling in dogs. In addition, pets with diarrhea or other intestinal illnesses may not be able to make it outside fast enough.
Can a dog`s bladder infection go away on its own? Although in some cases bladder infections in people clear up without the need for medical care, this is unlikely to be true for your dog.
There are many reasons why your pet`s urine may contain blood, a symptom known as hematuria. Some common causes include urinary tract infections, bladder or kidney stones, cancer and systemic bleeding disorders.
There are no known effective home remedies for peeing blood in dogs. In some cases, a preventative dose of cranberry extract may help dogs with recurrent infections.
The clinical signs of more advanced kidney failure include loss of appetite, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and very bad breath. Occasionally, ulcers will be found in the mouth.
Dogs with UTIs generally attempt to urinate very frequently whenever they go outside. They also may strain to urinate, or cry out or whine when urinating if it is painful. Sometimes you might even see blood in their urine. Dripping urine, or frequent licking of the genitals, may also signal that a UTI is present.
Stress from changes to a pet`s routine or environment is another common trigger for pets predisposed to UTIs. UTIs are typically a chronic affliction that needs long term management to prevent them from reoccurring.
Bladder infections are painful but not life threatening. However, this symptom could also represent obstruction of the urinary tract by bladder stones — a situation that is very urgent indeed. Either way, your pet will be best off by seeing the vet since bladder infections, as mentioned above, are very painful.
If you have a female dog that has not been spayed, you may see some blood when your dog urinates during her heat cycle. This is not necessarily an indication of a problem.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 14 week old puppy just started peeing red urine. It doesn’t look like blood. It looks like watered down kool aid. She is acting normal. No symptoms
ANSWER : A. That sounds concerning. There could be an internal issue or kidney or bladder infection. She should be seen by a vet to determine cause.

Read Full Q/A … : Leerburg

Q. My puppy is urinating a lot. And the lady I gave one of the puppies to said she thinks her puppy has diabetes could my puppy have it to
ANSWER : A. It is not likely that either one of these puppies has diabetes. It is very uncommon for a puppy that young to have diabetes. If your puppy is straining to urinate or is urinating very small amounts frequently and cannot seem to wait for very long between urination, he may have a urinary tract infection. It is quite possible that your puppy is completely normal. I would suggest an exam with your veterinarian and discuss the behavior with them. They may suggest a urinalysis. Your puppy should be going to the vet at 3 week intervals for vaccinations at this age, so you can discuss it when he has his next set of vaccines. The other person with the other puppy should also be taking hers to a vet for proper immunizations and she should also discuss her concerns with her vet.

Q. How do I get my dog to stop chewing on things? I kennel her when I leave for a few hours, but I can’t go to the mailbox without her eating something.
ANSWER : A. If she’s young, then this is just normal puppy behavior. Don’t worry about it. The thing about puppies is, they explore using their mouths. If your puppy grabs a coat hanger, or a slipper, you should roll up a newspaper, and smack yourself on the head with it for leaving those things out.. your puppy is going to explore things, that’s normal! It is 100% up to YOU to keep those things away from your puppy when your puppy is unsupervised… even for just a moment.

Remember to never scold your puppy for grabbing these things. They are just curious little cuties, and they don’t chew things up to bother us.. Dogs do not have intentional thought, so they aren’t ever doing anything ON PURPOSE to us.. The most important thing you can do when your puppy is chewing something you don’t want her to be chewing is TRADE her the inappropriate item with a toy of hers, so she understands “no honey, that isn’t what puppies chew on… THIS is what puppies chew on!” and then begin playing with her using her toy to show her that TOYS ARE FUN.. Way more fun than a boring ol’ coat hanger.

Another helpful thing you can do is have two bags of toys. In each bag is many different kinds of toys. Lots of chew toys, lots of soft squeaky toys, lots of rope-type toys, a bunch of balls.. All kinds of things! For one week you have bag#1’s toys out for your puppy to play with.. At the end of the one week, you collect those toys, and you bring out bag#2! The toys will be more interesting/feel like new to your puppy, which will in-turn, make her chew less inappropriate things. Her toys are too fun to care about that dumb Wii-mote that you left laying around.

Hope this helps!

Q. My 3 month puppy eats his own poop and is also biting what can I do to prevent this
ANSWER : A. When it comes to poop eating, you want to consider a few things. First off, what is his diet like? Maybe something is lacking in his diet that is causing him to want to eat his own poop. This is the most common reason why dogs eat THEIR OWN poop. Try a higher quality kibble like Taste of the Wild, Ziwipeak, Orijen.. and try feeding three meals per day, instead of the more common two meals per day. Remember to gradually switch his kibble. Add a little bit of the new kibble and reduce the old kibble very slowly.. little by little every couple of days until the bowl is mostly new kibble! You should also be cleaning up his poops IMMEDIATELY after he does them.. I mean like, you have a bag in your hand, and you are low enough to scoop it up RIGHT when he finished so he doesn’t have a chance to eat his poop.

When it comes to nipping there are a few things you can do. First, you should yelp as soon as the teeth touch your skin, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore the puppy until he is ignoring you. Once he is off doing his own thing, swoop down and calmly reward him by playing with him WITH A TOY so he doesn’t nip your hands. Whenever you pet him, or interact with him, you should always have a toy on-hand so you can give it to him. This toy should be a soft braided rope toy that YOU own. This means, your puppy is never allowed to have this toy on the floor, and your pup can never “win” tug games with this toy. This is YOUR toy that disappears when you’re finished playing, and reappears when you want to play. If you keep this up, in a weeks time, your puppy will be so excited to see that toy, that as soon as you bring it out, he stops nipping you because he wants to play with the toy. Another thing you can do is have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/soft toys/squeaky toys/etc. After one week, Bag#1 disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys as Bag#1, and it only stays out for one week. This keeps the toys feeling like new to your pup!

Q. Cat isn’t moving much, not vocal, not eating much of favourite food and is limping. Indoor, urine and feces look normal. What could be wrong?
ANSWER : A. Unfortunately there could be a lot of things going on. Some of them are more likely or unlikely depending on your cat’s age, but I’ll give you a general idea. You’re describing two basic problems – lethargy and inappetance, which often go together in cats. Causes can include organ diseases, like kidney or liver problems, heart problems, hormonal diseases like diabetes, or blood disorders that cause anemia (low red blood cells). Your vet will likely recommend blood work and possibly x-rays to get started. But keep in mind it might take some testing to figure out what’s going on, because these are pretty vague symptoms. Good luck.

Q. MY Shih Tzu IS 14 YEARS OLD. SHE WILL NOT LIFT HER HEAD UP EVEN WHEN YOU ASK HER IF SHE WANTS A TREAT. NORMALLY WHEN YOU SAY TREAT SHE COMES RUNNING .
ANSWER : A. From what you’re describing I think 2 things are likely. Either your dog has pain in her neck, which is causing her to not want to move her head, or she’s feeling generalized weakness.

Neck pain in small dogs is usually due to disk problems. They get a form of disk disease known as Hansen’s type II chronic disease, where the disk gradually moves upward and presses slowly on the spinal cord, causing pain and weakness.

Generalized weakness can be due to a number of conditions, starting with just not feeling well due to a GI problem (nausea, for example) to something like anemia (low red blood cell count) or heart disease. It sounds very much like your girl isn’t feeling well, and likely need some diagnostics in order to figure out what’s going on. You vet will start with a physical examination and rule out possible neck pain, and then will likely recommend blood work or other tests. If you want to talk to us further we can probably provide more information on a consult, where we can get more details about exactly what’s going on.

Q. 2 month old Bulldog. While playing gets TOO rough:gripping hand REALLY tight/growling/shaking to the point of drawing blood. Aggresive?Normal?HELP!!
ANSWER : A. For the most part, this sounds pretty normal to me. English Bulldogs can be like this. What you can do is teach him bite inhibition. He needs to know that biting gets him nothing. Each and every time he nips, even gently, you immediately yelp like a puppy would, stand up, cross your arms, and ignore your puppy. Once he is ignoring you, go back to calmly playing with him WITH A TOY. Remember to always use a toy when playing with/petting/interacting with puppies. They will be teething very soon, and they don’t understand that biting you is inappropriate, so using a toy to redirect their attention is important. He needs SOMETHING to bite, or else he will choose your hand. Give him more options.

Another thing you can do is have a toy that YOU OWN. This can be a soft braided rope toy or something of the like. Dot not allow your dog to have this toy whenever he wants. This toy disappears when you are done playing with him with it, and reappears when you want to play. Never allow him to “win” games with this toy. Eventually, the toy will hold so much meaning, when he sees it, he will be instantly interested in the toy instead of your hands.

It also helps to have two bags of toys. Bag#1 is full of chew toys/rope toys/soft toys/etc. It comes out for one week, and then disappears and out comes Bag#2. Bag#2 has the same types of toys in it. This will keep the toys feeling like “new” to your pup and make him less likely to chew on you during play!

Q. Rescued a dog almost two weeks ago, and now that her kennel cough is gone her personality shines!! No previous training, how should I start?
ANSWER : A. POST FOUR:

After your dog is familiar with the behavior you lured from scratch, and taught to your dog, you can start to use the “no-reward marker” I talked about. What you do is ask the dog to perform the behavior, and if the dog does not perform the behavior, you simply say your no-reward marker (choose one: eh-eh, hey, uh-oh, oops) show them the treat, put it behind your back, and BRIEFLY ignore your dog. Just turn your back for a second or two, before turning back to your dog and saying, “let’s try that again.” When you’re ready to start over with your dog, make sure you move around. If you are repeating the same cue while in the same position, while your dog is in the same position, you are likely to receive the same results. The more you move around, and start fresh, the better your chances are of having your dog listen to your cue the second time around. BIG rewards when they dog it successfully! Lots of praise and treats.

My no-reward marker is “hey.” When my dog does something wrong I say, “hey” and she immediately understands that she needs to offer a different behavior. This is clear to her. I don’t have to say it in a mean way, I simply say, “hey” in a normal tone of voice and she understands what the word means.

Once you’ve built up that connection and communication with your new dog, you can work on all kinds of fun behaviors! I personally enjoy the more zen-like behaviors: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ruy9UMcuGh8

I like to teach my dog fun tricks that offer her a “job” to do of sorts like object retrieval: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4iertZSva8

(object retrieval training completed; what it looks like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jx0Dml28FGY)

Scent-games are fun too! Very confidence building. Hide a REALLY smelly treat in a box, and place that box in a line of boxes. Let your dog go in the room while saying something like “search!” or “find it!” and watch them hunt for that smelly treat! Lots of rewards when they find it!