Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. You should see a behaviourist to find out what is causing these attacs and apply desensitize therapy. You can use pheromone collars or diffusors to calm him ( DAP, Settle down).

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

There are many reasons why your dog may be shaking, including fear, infection, pain, or low blood sugar. “If you notice your dog shaking, it is not something to take lightly. You should always seek veterinary attention if you notice your pet trembling,” Matejka says.
Neurological conditions such as seizures, viruses (such as Distemper) can cause your dog to act scared and shake. Neurological conditions cause involuntary shaking and seizing which can be very scary for your dog and cause them to show fear and to shake uncontrollably.
A dog can experience a panic attack for a number of reasons. Common triggers include noises, strange or scary places, or separation anxiety, but we don`t always discover the trigger. Keep your dog calm, and book a visit with the vet to get to the bottom of it.
If your dog is having a panic attack, stay calm. You may be able to soothe your dog by providing them with a distraction. For instance, you might bring out one of their favorite toys, play with them, take them for a walk, or practice obedience exercises where you reward them with treats.
Anxiety and fear

It`s common for dogs to tremble when they experience fear or anxiety.

What are the symptoms of canine distemper? Initially, infected dogs will develop watery to pus-like discharge from their eyes. They then develop fever, nasal discharge, coughing, lethargy, reduced appetite, and vomiting.
Stress signs to look for include whale eye (when dogs reveal the whites of their eyes), tucked ears, tucked tail, raised hackles, lip-licking, yawning, and panting. Your dog might also avoid eye contact or look away.
Signs of panic attacks in dogs include: Distressed whining. Barking. Shaking.
Dogs that experience any number of these symptoms may start to have panic attacks. Panic attacks can last from minutes to hours, and can involve any number of the above symptoms.
A psychiatric service dog can help someone with anxiety by: Detecting signs of a panic attack before it begins 3. Helping their handler avoid triggers. Reminding their handler to take their medication.
Hypoadrenocorticism is an uncommon disease in dogs, and it is caused by a deficiency of essential hormones that are made by the adrenal glands. Also known as Addison`s disease, the clinical signs may appear as vague signs of illness that come and go.
Leptospirosis is an infectious disease that causes serious illness in dogs, other animals, and people. The disease is caused by spiral-shaped bacteria called leptospires that live in water or warm, wet soil. Initial signs of leptospirosis include fever, lethargy, and lack of appetite.
Canine adenoviruses (CAVs) and canine herpesvirus (CHV) are pathogens of dogs that have been known for several decades. The two distinct types of CAVs, type 1 (CAV-1) and type 2 (CAV-2), are responsible for infectious canine hepatitis (ICH) and infectious tracheobronchitis (ITB), respectively [1], [2].
Common symptoms of anxiety include increased vigilance, drooling, panting, restlessness, compulsive behavior, changes in sleep patterns, more barking than usual, urinating or defecating indoors, destructive behavior, and depression.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. My 2 year old Boxer mix seems to be having panic attacks ,hiding shaking the vet gave her zanecs but its not working
ANSWER : A. You should see a behaviourist to find out what is causing these attacs and apply desensitize therapy. You can use pheromone collars or diffusors to calm him ( DAP, Settle down).

Read Full Q/A … : Vetinfo

Q. What are the ways and/or steps to become a veterinarian?
ANSWER : A. Being a veterinarian is a rewarding career, but does involve a lot of schooling, experience and knowledge. Many people try out veterinary medicine through being a tech or assistant first, then continue on to veterinary school if they decide that is the path for them. If you are still in high school, the best way to start gaining experience is just by volunteering at your local animal shelter. Some clinics will also hire kennel technicians, a good starting job that gets you into a clinic and viewing procedures while working your way up. You can major in anything you want in college, however there are class prerequisites that must be met to apply for vet school. Majoring in a degree program such as biology, zoology or animal sciences often meets these requirements without having to take extra classes. Working summers as a tech or assistant, staying active in local animal groups and maintaining a high GPA will make you an ideal candidate. Once you are ready to apply for vet school you will need to take a GRE which is an exam graduate and medical schools use to determine how well you might do. Vet schools tend to look for applicants who are active in the community, have experience and have good grades. If considered, you will then have an interview to determine if you’re a good fit! Vet school itself requires four years, the first two focused on classroom and theory subjects such as anatomy, physiology and pathology. Your third year becomes more hands on with lots of labs and “shadowing” of vets in the school. Fourth year is usually entirely clinical rotations to give you a taste of all the things veterinary medicine offers!

Q. I have a 13 1/2 year old Shih Tzu. How old is he in dog years?
ANSWER : A. It’s used to be that dog years were 7 years to every 1. Now it normally around 5 years to every year as long as your dog is healthy and kept up with vaccines. So he’s about 68ish in dog years.

Read Full Q/A … : Shih Tzu Age

Q. We have a 3 yr old Weiner dog, she is having pus in her eyes, I took her to the vet he gave me derma vet ointment, used it as the doctor prescribed
ANSWER : A. If the pus really isn’t all that bad, and it’s just some discharge, your pup may benefit from a diet change. It could be that the food you’re feeding just isn’t right for your dog, and that’s okay! Dogs grow and change over time, and now that your dog is fully matured, a diet change may be in order. Try something like Taste of the Wild, maybe a grain free dog food, Orijen, or Ziwipeak. These are all really great food options.

If the pus is really bad, and continues to get worse, see your vet again and let them know what’s going on. Maybe you could try a diet change, and then see if there are any improvements.

Remember, you should always gradually change a dogs diet. By gradually, I mean you put a tiny bit of new kibble in with a bowl of the old kibble. Reduce the old kibble by just a few bits of kibble. Throughout the course of at least two weeks (or as long as you want depending on whether or not you want to finish off the old food) you slowly add more of the new kibble while removing some of the old kibble. This makes the process gradual, and won’t cause any tummy-upset in your dog.

Q. Does an indoor cat need to be vaccinated every year?
ANSWER : A. In practice, I recommend a feline combo vaccine every year, but will generally start administering every 3 years once they have had their kitten vaccines and 2 additional yearly vaccines. Rabies, is required yearly by law, and if kept up to date can be good for up to three years also. Based on the age of your cat I would give a yearly feline combo and rabies, and then boost the combo again next year.

Q. My male pet rat is 2 years old. He has lost loads of weight and has invisible lumps all over his body.
ANSWER : A. He should be seen by your vet or a vet experienced in treating pocket pets. At 2 years old, he is considered a “senior aged” rat. A simple needle aspirate biopsy submitted for pathology can frequently determine the makeup of most lumps.

Q. My cocker spaniel is 9 years old. He has involuntary bowel movements (little drops) very frequently, especially when he is asleep.
ANSWER : A. Is your dog on a senior dog food? I would get your dog on a high quality high protien dog food. Ask a pet store assosicate or your regular vet for a food recommendation. When you buy a better food the dog will have to eat less to get the same amount of energy from the food. The dog has to eat more of the cheaper foods to get the energy it needs from it. Meaning more poop and buying more food. So the cost really evens out. So the lessen your dogs bowel movements get on a better senior dog food. Next talk to your vet they may have a recommendation. If you switch dogs do it slowly by mixing the foods. Start with 10% new 90% old mixed for at least a week until you have switched to 100% new 0% old. Senior foods have more fiber to help with bowel movements. Take the dog outside to go potty more frequently, right before bed time.

Read Full Q/A … : Symptoms Questions & Answers

Q. My 13 year old male cat is acting lethargic & doesn’t seem to be feeling well. I don’t know what’s wrong except that he has fleas. Can too many fleas
ANSWER : A. Excessive fleas can cause anemia in cats, left untreated, this can be life-threatening. I recommend getting your cat seen by your vet right away for his illness. For every flea you see on your pet, there are 100 more in the environment. Get your pet on a good topical or oral flea control through your vet. In flea control, you get what you pay for. Consider asking your vet for a dose of Capstar. It helps get the problem under control by killing the fleas on the pet starting in five minutes but only lasts for 24 hours.

You need to treat your home. If you use a pest control service, tell them you are having a flea problem and they can adjust their treatment. Use a premise spray that also contains an IGR, insect growth regulator. This keeps eggs and larvae from maturing into adults and helps break the life cycle. Also, vacuum EVERY DAY, throwing out the bag or emptying the canister every time into an outside receptacle and spraying the contents with insecticide to kill the fleas you’ve vacuumed up.

Treat your yard, since fleas will hop a ride into your home on your pant leg without you knowing it. Concentrate on areas under bushes, in the shade. Fleas are less likely to be located in open sunny areas where it gets hot.

If chemicals are a problem, you can use borax. Sprinkle it into rugs, into corners and under furniture, use a broom to work it into the fibers and let it sit for hours, days even. It won’t hurt you or your pet. Then vacuum it up, reapply as needed. Food grade diatomaceous earth can be gotten from a health food store and worked into the rugs and corners in the same way. These treatments aren’t as fast and effective as chemical insecticides but they can help.

Be patient, you may have to repeat these steps multiple times 10-14 days apart to help break the flea life cycle.