er spasm.

Experienced and professional animal trainer provide their insights in answering this question :
A. There are anti-spasmic meds that they can give him such as Valium or prazosin to help him with the spasms, If they put a urinary catheter in him the spasms are a normal occurrence after removing the urinary catheter.

How to Identify Common Pet Problems ?

Our sources include academic articles, blog posts, and personal essays from experienced pet care professionals :

Your pet should have access to a litter box at all times, which should be kept clean to encourage urination. Monitor that your pet is urinating at least 1-2 times daily. If you have not seen your pet urinate in 24 hours and water intake has been adequate, please contact your veterinary team for evaluation.
Some cats may experience another blockage a few hours or days after the catheter is removed, while others may re-block a few months or years later. It`s not possible to predict if and when this may occur, so it`s important to always monitor your cat for signs of another blockage.
Most cats are fully recovered by the time they have their sutures removed — generally 10 to 14 days after the procedure. Sedation may be required to remove the sutures, so don`t feed your cat before the appointment. Most cats do very well with PU and go on to live long, healthy lives free of pain and obstruction.
Urine dribbling, frequent urination, and blood in the urine are common for up to 3-5 days after surgery. Cats should be urinating small amounts almost immediately upon returning home.
We may wish to recheck the area to ensure there is no infection. Some pets may urinate less after surgery or may seem to be unable to control urination. This is usually temporary and may be a side effect of medication, anesthesia drugs, or difficulty assuming “the position” to urinate.
Most patients resume normal voiding function upon a trial without catheterization 1 to 3 days from catheter placement. Two important situations tend to buck this trend: patients whose surgeries involved pelvic nerves vital to micturition and patients with severe, unidentified voiding problems pre-existing the surgery.
How long can cats hold their pee? Most felines can go without peeing for 24 to 48 hours without experiencing any adverse effects. However, if your cat is holding it in for longer, it may indicate more serious medical conditions.
Possibly the most common causes for this problem in cats are urinary tract infections and urinary obstructions. However, infrequent urination can also sometimes be caused by more serious conditions like kidney disease, idiopathic cystitis, and even cancer in some extreme cases.
Studies have shown that cats tend to live around three to five years after PU surgery. That being said, this surgery won`t negatively harm their life expectancy. With proper preventive care, your cat can live a happy, healthy, blockage-free life.
For most procedures, your cat`s activity should be restricted for one week after surgery. It is essential to avoid running, jumping, and other strenuous activities that could cause excessive strain on the wound.
o Many cats will not have a bowel movement for the first 3-4 days after surgery. o Reasons that a cat will not have a regular bowel movement after surgery include: – Your cat has been fasted prior to surgery. – Your cat may not have eaten well during their hospital stay or the first few days home.
Although perineal urethrostomy is usually a successful procedure when performed correctly, numerous serious complications have been reported, including stricture formation and recurrent obstruction, bacterial urinary tract infection (UTI), sterile cystitis, subcutaneous urine leakage at the surgical site, urinary and …
Many pets will not have a bowel movement for the first 3-4 days after anesthesia and surgery. This is normal as long as there is no straining to attempt defecation.
Call an Emergency Vet Right Away if Your Cat`s Having Urinating Problems or if They Can`t Pee. There are a plethora of reasons your cat might have problems urinating. The most common is a UTI. Cystitis and kidney stones or blockages can cause problems as well.
Delayed recovery is often attributable to hypothermia, so heat support should be considered in any patient experiencing a slow anesthetic recovery. Intravenous fluids and oxygen therapy can also be beneficial in such cases. Emergence delirium may also occur in recovering cats, characterized by wild thrashing.
Being unable to pass urine after surgery (post-operative urinary retention or `PO-UR`) affects four out of every 10 patients who have had an operation. It is particularly common in older people having hip or knee replacement surgery. PO-UR is managed by inserting a tube to drain the bladder, or `catheterisation`.
It takes approximately six-twelve (6-12) weeks for the incision to heal. If the patient is unable to pass urine, or experiences difficulty, seek medical advice. No intercourse for four weeks following the operation.
Your Recovery

You will probably need pain medicine for 1 to 2 weeks. You can expect your urostomy (stoma) to be swollen and tender at first. This usually improves after 2 to 3 weeks. You may notice some blood in your urine or that your urine is light pink for the first 3 weeks after surgery.

If it goes over 48 to 72 hours, schedule a visit to her vet. Failure to urinate or defecate creates a risk of injury due to the toxin buildup in your cat`s system. Increase in toxins can make your cat sick and may lead to damage in her vital organs. Worse, it may cause death.
If your cat hasn`t released urine in over 24 hours, it`s an emergency, Kelly Williams, DVM, medical director of VCA Carrollwood Cat Hospital, says. You have a better chance of noticing this if you`re scooping your cat`s litter box frequently.
In advanced cases, where the urine flow has been stopped for more than 24 hours, they can become systemically ill from retained toxins and start vomiting, or become very weak and lethargic. Death usually happens within 48 hours, and it`s not a pleasant way to go.
Therefore, even if a cat has had food or water recently, it should be able to hold the urine inside somewhere between 24 and 48 hours.
You can expect your pet to have urgency to urinate frequently, a tendency to strain to urinate, and to have blood-tinged urine for 1-2 weeks. Please allow frequent access their routine “bathroom” location to urinate.
Unfortunately, there is not much you can do to remedy a urinary blockage at home. Cats require veterinary attention, and trying to solve the issue at home may worsen the problem.

Relevant Questions and Answers :

the most relevant questions and answers related to your specific issue

Q. Why do cats meow?
ANSWER : A. Cat parents often wish they could better understand what their favorite feline friends want or desire. A cat’s meow can be interpreted in many different ways and can indicate an array of feelings and needs. Here are some of the most common reasons for your cat’s vocalizations:

1. Greeting- Many cats will meow as a greeting when you enter your home or walk into a room. Cats will also meow at another cat or animal in the household to extend a hello and acknowledge the other animal’s presence.

2. Attention – An exuberant meow followed by leg rubbing or another attention seeking behavior may indicate your cat is looking for some quality time spent together. Some petting or rubbing behind the ears may be in order.

3. Hunger – A meowing cat is often a hungry cat. This is one of the most common reasons for a cat to vocalize to their owners. A cat will meow to get your attention at feeding times or even when they want extra food.

4. Sickness – A sick or hurt cat may begin to meow excessively, warranting a visit to the veterinarian. There are numerous reasons for a cat in distress to meow—whether it is related to an upset stomach, an injured leg or a urinary blockage. These meows should be carefully investigated.

5. Entering or leaving – Most cats will vocalize when they want to be let in or out of a room. You may notice when you are in the bathroom or behind the closed door of a room that your cat begins to meow, scratches at the door, and often reaches its paw under the door. This is a clear indication that the cat wants to be where you are.

6. Angry – An agitated cat may meow to warn their owner or another household pet that they are upset and would like to be left alone. This angry meow may increase in sound volume as the cat becomes more stressed or agitated. Often a cat will exhibit this type of meow at the veterinary office when they are unhappy with their examination or restraint.

Each feline is different and so are their vocalizations. Learn to understand the variety of meows your cat uses on a daily basis. This will help you develop a better relationship with your cat and help them live a more trusting and happier life.

Q. My 2 yr old cat had pu surgery Thursday. He still couldn’t pee,so Friday went back in,cleaned the bladder. Today he cant pee. They say bladder spasm.
ANSWER : A. There are anti-spasmic meds that they can give him such as Valium or prazosin to help him with the spasms, If they put a urinary catheter in him the spasms are a normal occurrence after removing the urinary catheter.

Q. My cat continues to scratch on furniture and carpets. He has plenty of scratching posts around the house. Please help!
ANSWER : A. Scratching is a natural behavior in cats that can be frequently frustrating for pet owners who want to keep their furniture from being shredded on a constant basis. The texture of furniture and carpet is very appealing to cats and this why they frequently choose to spend their time on this activity as opposed to playing with their own cat toys. Here are some suggestions to help curb this unwanted behavior:

1. Purchase a cat scratching post or cat tree that is covered in carpeted or textured material. Place it in an appealing spot that your cat would be inclined to spend time (eg. in the sun). You can also place catnip on the scratching post or cat tree to make your cat even more interested in the new object.

2. You can utilize double sided tape on the ends of the furniture because you cat will not like the sticky feeling and will learn to not scratch in that region. Use the tape that has a lighter adhesive in order to prevent any permanent damage. Other materials, such as aluminum foil or bubble wrap can also be placed on the furniture to discourage the scratching.

3. Keep nails trimmed short by either learning to do this on your own at home or using a veterinary technician, or groomer. Nails can usually be trimmed every 6-8 weeks.

4. Redirect the unwanted behavior. If your cat begins scratching, use a favorite or new toy to distract the cat from the scratching. Give your cat positive praise for not scratching.

5. As a last resort you can use a spray bottle full of water to spritz your cat when he or she is scratching inappropriately at your furniture. Generally, cats do not like water and this will discourage them from continuing the behavior.

Have patience with your cat because it can takes time to understand this is an unwanted behavior and that furniture is not another toy for them to use. You can always consult your veterinary or veterinary behaviorist to help with ideas or further solutions to this problem.

Read Full Q/A … : I found Pickle on

Q. My cat is pooping outside of the litter bix. He is 2 1/2. He did this as a kitten. It stopped then started about 3 months ago. Litterbox is clean.
ANSWER : A. Inappropriate elimination or house soiling can be a frustrating problem but with a bit of detective work on your part, there is hope. First, before deciding that this is a behavioral issue, any medical problems (diarrhea, constipation, fecal incontinence, pain on defecation, etc.) need to be ruled out and/or treated. If your cat receives a clean bill of health from your vet but is still eliminating outside the litterbox, then we need to consider that something about the box itself might be aversive to your cat. Cats can be quite finicky about their litterbox and toileting habits. Below I have listed common recommendations and cat preferences for litterbox use. Review the list and make any changes that could account for your cat’s aversion to defecating in the litterbox:
* Soft, fine-grained clumping litter (vs, coarse-grained, non-clumping litter)
* Unscented
* 1 – 1 1/2 inch depth (especially older cats or cats with hip problems)
* Larger pans (especially for large cats) – want to get whole body inside – poop just outside the box might mean the box is too small
* Open, non-hooded
* At least one shallow side to get in and out easily
* Easy to get to – not hidden away, preferably in areas they spend time in or near – and not near appliances that make scary, unpredictable noises (washers, dryers, refrigerators)
* Scoop minimum 1X/day – preferably 2
* Clean the litterbox with soap and water and put in fresh scoopable litter at least once/month (instead of just continuously adding)
* Some cats prefer to urinate in one box and defecate in a separate box, so you may need 2 boxes even if you just have 1 cat. Multi-cat households should have 1 box/cat plus 1 extra.

Q. How should I interpret my cat’s tail movements?
ANSWER : A. Our feline friends express themselves in many different ways, including through the use of their tails. Most pet owners pay close attention to a happy or excited dog, but they are sometimes less attentive to the posture and movement of their cat. Here are some of the most common cat tail behaviors, and the underlying emotion behind each action:

A flicking tail: Many anxious, nervous or stressed cats will hold their tail in a low position and flick it quickly back and forth. This is often referred to as angry tail, and a pet owner or veterinarian should be on guard for any possible aggressive or defensive activity. If a cat is moving their tail slowly, and not exhibiting the flicking motion, then this cat is at a much calmer state.

Vertical position: Most of the time when a cat is holding their tail in a straight, vertical position this is indicating curiosity and a playful mood. A cat chasing after a laser pointer or playing toys will often have their tails in a vertical position showing their enjoyment. This position also helps with balanced movements. In contrast, if the tail is in the vertical position and the cat’s back is arched with pinned back ears then this could demonstrate a feeling of being threatened and thus result in defensive or aggressive behaviors.

The Tucked Tail: Similar to a dog, a tucked tail often indicates submission or fear. Your cat is conveying upset feelings and should most likely be left alone. This tucked tail appearance can also make a cat look smaller and less threatening to an aggressive cat.

The Tail Twine: Cats will often hook their tail around another cat’s tail, owner’s legs or other objects to show a friendly and affectionate nature. They are also trying to indicate whether they want to receive affection from their owners, be fed or have playtime.

The next time you are home with your feline companion take note on how they express themselves through their tail movements, their ears, body posture and vocalization. You can start to better understand their needs and wants, in addition to what makes them uncomfortable or happy. Cats will surprise you with their array of emotions and varied expressions they can express.

Q. I found a large amount of pee from my unfixed male cat and it had blood in it. I notice later what looked similar to crystals in the same puddle. Help
ANSWER : A. You should have your cat examined and a urinalysis done immediately. Some cats do form crystals in their urine which leads to bladder inflammation,look in the urine, pain and in creased frequency of urination. The specific problem with male cats is the narrow width of the urethra through which the urine passes. Make cats have a very narrow urethra unlike female cats. The crystals, blood and other “sludge” that forms in the bladder when a cat has cystitis can cause a blockage in male cats and this is an emergency. A urinalysis can determine the extent of the problem and allow your vet to recommend appropriate treatment before it becomes an emergency. Your cat should be seen today.

Read Full Q/A … : Causes of Blood in Cat Urine

Q. I want to know from a veterinarian that has owned indoor cats if they agree with declawing? Also, is the whole digit still removed?
ANSWER : A. I am not a veterinarian, but a certified dog trainer. I have studied cat behavior as well, so I have some knowledge in that area. Cats need their claws in my opinion. When a cat is declawed, it can sometimes cause serious anxiety and frustration in the declawed cat. This is because the cat can not de-stress by digging at a scratching post, and a cat feels defenceless without its nails. It is a sad sight to see when a cat who is declawed is dealing with anxiety. I’ve met declawed cats who seem very unstable. It’s difficult to tell whether or not the cats would be so unstable had they not been declawed, but I’ve never seen a cat who has all of its nails act the way a declawed cat acts.

That’s just my two cents.

Read Full Q/A … : snopes.com: Declawing cats

Q. Male neutered cat [1 1/2 years old] has just started trying to spray everywhere around the house. Nothing is coming out. No recent changes.
ANSWER : A. Changes in urinary habits can be caused by a number of things, especially in neutered male cats. Attempting to urinate or have accidents in places other than the litter box can often be a sign of a urinary tract infection, or crystals and debris in the bladder causing problems. Pets may need to go more frequently, may dribble or urinate in small amounts more often, may have accidents or may have blood-tinged or cloudy urine.Infections are usually treated with medications and changes to the diet, however in some cases of large stones or crystals surgery may be needed.

Male cats can also experience urinary blockage. This is due to a unique anatomical part or the urethra that forms a U-shape before exiting the body in male cats. If a cat has crystals or other debris in the urine, it can block at this point preventing urine from being able to exit. Cats may attempt to urinate without producing anything, may become very vocal (indicating pain) or may have a hunched back, full abdomen or pain in the abdomen (protecting the very full bladder). Urinary blockage IS a medical emergency so if suspected, your vet or local emergency clinic should be contacted immediately. Treatment usually involves a hospital stay and catheterization of the bladder to remove the blockage and allow urine to drain followed by medications and a change in diet to prevent further problems.

It is best to try and collect a sample of urine and make an appointment for your cat if he has had a change in urinary habits. If you do suspect a blockage, then contact your vet ASAP is best.